2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
    Jun 16, 2024  
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 384 - Molecular Dynamics


    This half-semester laboratory-based course explores the effect of molecular motion and intermolecular forces on both the microscopic and bulk properties of matters. The topics investigated include viscosity, surface tension, isomerization kinetics, and relaxation phenomena.

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 334  or CHEM 336  (may be taken concurrently)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 385 - Biophysical Chemistry Methods


    This half-semester integrated laboratory course is designed to be an introduction to modern methods of biophysical chemistry and a bridge to independent research in biological chemistry. Specifically, this course includes techniques of protein purification from heterologous overexpression or natural sources. This course also focuses on modern methods of protein characterization, including electrophoresis, spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics, dynamic light scattering, and/or x-ray crystallography.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 387 - Special Topics: Structure and Analysis


    This half-semester integrated laboratory course offers an in-depth study of quantitative and structural analysis. Students complete an independent project employing techniques that may include advanced NMR (selective decoupling, variable-temperature, NOESY), mass spectrometry including MALDI and MS/MS, chromatographic separations, and small molecule X-ray crystallography.

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 413 - Molecular Symmetry


    This half-semester course provides an introduction to the use of group theory to describe the symmetry of molecules, and to aid in understanding their structure, bonding, and spectroscopy. The focus is on small molecules in the main group and transition-metal complexes.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 212  or CHEM 214 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 415 - Organometallic Chemistry


    This half-semester course is a survey of the organometallic chemistry of the transition elements, focusing on synthesis, bonding, structure, elementary reactions, and application to homogenous catalysis.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 212  or CHEM 214 ) and CHEM 264 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 431 - Molecular Modeling and Simulation


    This half-semester course introduces modern simulation techniques in computational chemistry, including ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Students learn the underlying theory of these methods at a basic level while getting hands-on experience studying chemical systems of their choice, from isolated molecules to aqueous biomolecules.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 333  or CHEM 336 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 432 - Introduction to Statistical Thermodynamics


    This half-semester course starts with a review of pertinent statistics, quantum chemistry, and spectroscopy topics. The concepts of ensemble, partition function, and their relationship with ideal gas thermodynamics quantities like internal energy, entropy, Gibbs energy, equilibrium constant, and other macroscopic observations are discussed.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 333  and CHEM 334 ) or CHEM 336 . CHEM 334  may be taken concurrently.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 452 - Metabolic Chemistry


    This half-semester course is dedicated to exploring the chemical themes and mechanisms of biological metabolism. Specifically, the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, and nucleotides is investigated.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 454 - Bioenergetics


    This half-semester biochemistry course covers the energy processes in living systems. The major focus of the course is mammalian biochemistry and cellular respiration in the mitochondria, but bacterial biochemistry and photosynthesis are also discussed.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 456 - Bioinorganic Chemistry


    This half-semester course provides an introduction to the field of bioinorganic chemistry, a discipline at the interface of chemistry and biology. Topics and theoretical principles from coordination chemistry are applied to the study of metallo-enzymes and other systems involving metal ions. Emphasis is placed on mechanisms and structures in which metals play an essential role. Biological oxidation, nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis, DNA-metal complexes, organolead compounds are a few of the topics discusses in an effort to unify knowledge from classical sub-disciplines (inorganic and organic chemistry, biochemistry) into a picture in which students attempt to identify the paradigms in the mechanisms of life processes.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 461 - Organic Reaction Mechanisms


    In this half-semester course, a detailed study of organic reaction mechanisms is presented. Key mechanistic pathways are examined. Proposal of plausible mechanisms for organic reactions, experiments used to gain insight into reaction mechanisms, and the importance of mechanistic insight toward the practical application of organic reactions are considered. Classic organic reactions as well as recent examples from the primary literature are discussed.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 464 - Organic Synthesis


    In this half-semester course, a detailed study of the synthesis of organic compounds is presented. Particular attention is given to functional group compatibility, diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity, recent developments in organic reactions, as well as reaction catalysis. The primary literature is examined with an eye to better understand the design of the synthetic approach.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 468 - Medicinal Chemistry


    In this half-semester course, the basic principles of the drug discovery process are explored. Topics include traditional and novel approaches, mode of action, quantitative structure activity relationships, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and inactivation of medicinal agents. In addition, major drug classes are presented along with specific case studies for each category.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Annually

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 477 - Environmental Chemistry


    This half-semester course uses a firm grounding in chemistry to seek answers to the complex environmental questions faced by modern society. The scientific literature and field and laboratory experiments are used to explore a topic of interest such as energy production, natural cycles and their anthropogenic perturbations or environmental contaminants.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHEM 264  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 481 - Advanced Chemistry Research


    Original research projects designed for student collaboration with faculty members to build on and consolidate the previous experiences in research, project design, use of modern instrumentation for data acquisition and analysis, problem solution, and oral and written communication of results. A minimum of eight hours of laboratory work per week is required.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Chemistry, Biochemistry Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 482 - Advanced Chemistry Research


    Original research projects designed for student collaboration with faculty members to build on and consolidate the previous experiences in research, project design, use of modern instrumentation for data acquisition and analysis, problem solution, and oral and written communication of results. A minimum of eight hours of laboratory work per week is required.

    Credits: 0.50
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Chemistry, Biochemistry Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHEM 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Chinese

  
  • CHIN 121 - Elementary Chinese I


    This introduction to modern standard Chinese emphasizes understanding and speaking, with practice in reading and writing approximately 300 characters in either traditional or simplified forms. It covers basic structural patterns and vocabulary needed for ordinary conversation as well as future development.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 122 - Elementary Chinese II


    This introduction to modern standard Chinese emphasizes understanding and speaking, with practice in reading and writing approximately 300 characters in either traditional or simplified forms. It covers basic structural patterns and vocabulary needed for ordinary conversation as well as future development.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 121  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 195 - Elementary-Level Chinese Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese I


    Offers continued training in Modern Standard Chinese, with emphasis on reading and writing skills. Grammar review is combined with introduction to variations in speech and writing. Recitation and conversation sessions, role-play, and skits reinforce listening and speaking ability. By the end of the year, students may expect to communicate in both speech and writing on everyday topics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 122  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese II


    Offers continued training in Modern Standard Chinese, with emphasis on reading and writing skills. Grammar review is combined with introduction to variations in speech and writing. Recitation and conversation sessions, role-play, and skits reinforce listening and speaking ability. By the end of the year, students may expect to communicate in both speech and writing on everyday topics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 222 - China through Literature and Film


    Offers an introduction to representative works of Chinese literature in English translation, as well as works of Chinese film with English subtitles. Specific focus and selections vary from year to year. No knowledge of Chinese is expected.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: CHIN 222L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 222L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to CHIN 222 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: CHIN 222 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 250 - East Asian Thought


    Introduces several classics of East Asian thought, familiar to every educated person in Japan, China, and Korean. Like CORE 151/152 readings, these books are about human nature and what it means to be human. They are cultural expressions of timeless value and enriching resources for human fruition. Readings include major Confucian and Taoist text, selections from Mahayana Buddhist writings, and Japanese classes on aesthetics. Taught in English.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: JAPN 250 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CORE 151  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 288 - The Chinese City: Living Beijing (Extended Study)


    Ancient cosmological center of the world and current capital of a rapidly globalizing China, Beijing has long stirred the interest of natives and visitors alike. This interdisciplinary course explores the processes that have shaped and defined Beijing, especially during the past century or so. Topics include aesthetics of urban space, spatial symbolism, popular street life, arenas of political activism, and the impact of changing economic policies. Texts range from digitized historical maps and scroll paintings to film, novels, poetry, memoirs, travel guides, historical guides, and classics of urban studies scholarship.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Some Chinese language ability preferred but not required
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 292 - Chinese Language (Study Group)


    Study group students complete one language course taught by CET Shanghai staff. Placement determined by CET language-teaching staff.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 122   or equivalent 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 295 - Intermediate-Level Chinese Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 299 - Chinese Medical Culture and Practice


    Chinese medicine as a full-bodied version (not a part) of Chinese culture was first recorded in The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic dating back to the 5th century BC. Interrelating astronomy, cosmology, nature-human correspondence, seasonal climates’ impact on health, lifestyle adjustments, acupuncture, herbs, medical ethics and other topics, this text remains the cornerstone of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) today. The book’s broad and inter-defining perspectives set the tones for Chinese medical culture as a whole, further innovated throughout the ages up to the present day in and beyond China including our own New York State through the practice, teaching, and research of acupuncture.

    Credits: 1.0
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 303 - Films and Media


    By focusing on film, this course increases students’ fluency in all aspects of Chinese language. Students improve listening and speaking skills through viewing and discussion of materials that can range from film and television shows to online videos and podcasts; they improve reading, writing, and narration skills through work with written scripts. Through discussion and essay assignments, they learn to express personal responses, thoughts, and feelings.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 202   or equivalent experience
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 304 - Readings in Social Issues


    Through readings on developments in contemporary Chinese society, this course introduces students to the vocabulary and sentence structures specific to written Chinese. Exercises accompanying the readings and essay assignments help develop writing skills. The topics presented in the essays, such as the population explosion, new marriage practices, and new trends in popular culture, provide rich material for class discussion and improve the students’ speaking, listening, and narration skills.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 202   or equivalent experience
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 392 - Chinese Language (Study Group)


    Study group students complete one language course taught by CET Shanghai staff. Placement determined by CET language-teaching staff.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 395 - Advanced-Level Chinese Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 405 - Reading Chinese Newspapers


    Introduces the styles and conventions of Chinese newspaper language. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, forms, and structures that differ from everyday spoken Chinese, and tactics and skills for rapid reading. Aural-oral skills are reinforced through classroom discussions and supplementary materials.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 304  or CHIN 303  or equivalent experience
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 406 - Readings in Modern Culture


    Designed to expand and consolidate students’ aural and oral mastery of advanced vocabulary and grammatical patterns through the study of modern Chinese writers and their work. All readings are original works of literature (poetry, short fiction, familiar prose) written for Chinese readers. Conversation sessions take on contemporary topics ranging from the modern Chinese family to women’s issues, economic changes, and the urban experience.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 303  or CHIN 304   or equivalent experience
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 450 - Advanced Readings in Chinese Worldview


    Using primary materials in Chinese, this course builds discussion of the Chinese worldview and value system around clusters of key characters featuring interrelated themes of current relevance. Discussion takes place in Chinese but broadens into English when necessary to allow for more critical perspectives and more depth. To facilitate this process, some secondary readings in English are included. This approach brings together advanced Chinese majors/minors and students from various cultural backgrounds with native / near native Chinese language competence to explore Chinese culture on the same platform.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CHIN 405  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 481 - China in Transition (Study Group)


    Focuses on topics central to social, economic, and political transitions in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, with a special emphasis on Shanghai. It adopts a culturally immersive, interdisciplinary approach to comprehending changing Chinese lifestyles from perspectives that may include consumer culture, gender, workplace relations, ethnic diversity, and the environment. The course typically includes a cultural immersion internship and is enriched by readings, video viewings, guest lectures, and discussion. The goal is to arrive at an understanding of contemporary issues in China through both analysis and experience.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 482 - Topics in Chinese Culture (Study Group)


    Explores many of the topics introduced in its companion course, CHIN 481. Materials from literature, film, art, music, performance, and popular culture allow glimpses of the personal experience of people living through the changes and continuities discussed in CHIN 481, with an emphasis on cultural heritage and creative renovation of tradition. Guest lectures, readings, and discussion are enriched by culturally immersive field trips, visits to museums and temples, attendance at performances, and face-to-face meetings with scholars, artists, performers, and others. The course challenges students to develop sensitivity and imagination as well as understanding.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 492 - Chinese Language (Study Group)


    Study group students complete one language course taught by CET Shanghai staff. Placement determined by CET language-teaching staff.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CHIN 499 - Honors Project in Chinese


    Students pursuing honors research enroll in this course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



The Classics

  
  • CLAS 220 - Reviving the Polis: Staging Greeks in the 21st Century


    Explores the dramatic challenge of producing a Greek tragedy. Students focus on a Greek play of global impact, one that is performed all over the world today in a variety of different cultural and social contexts. Students begin with an introductory segment that explores what is distinctive about Greek tragedy and has made it a central part of an increasingly complex theatrical canon. The course concludes with students working in groups to experiment with and stage their own interpretations of scenes from the play.

    Credits: 1
    Crosslisted: THEA 220
    Corequisite: CLAS 220L
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 220L - Drama and the Greeks! Lab


    Required corequisite to CLAS 220.

    Credits: 0
    Corequisite: CLAS 220
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 221 - The Epic Voice and Its Echoes


    Beginning with the first poems in the Western tradition, this course studies the epic genre in all its distinctiveness and variety. It explores the themes and ideology of epic, ranging from the heroic to the philosophical and didactic, and considers how the poet deals with fundamental questions: the nature of heroism, life and death, individual and community, mortals and immortals, memory, and the power of poetry. It also examines the craft of the epic poet, uniquely situated between orality and writing. Authors studied include Homer, Hesiod, Apollonius, Lucretius, and Vergil.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 222 - The Tragic and Comic Muse


    Examines selected plays of the three great tragedians—Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides—and of the comedian Aristophanes. Focuses on the tragic account of human nature and its relationship to the gods, but considers as well comedy’s response to that account. Other topics for discussion include the role of Athenian politics, religion, and sociology within the plays and the importance of the classical stage in Athenian life.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 230 - Classical Mythology


    Introduces students to the myths of the ancient world, focusing on those of the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans, with consideration also of those of the Near East, south Asia, and northern Europe. Students not only acquire a thorough knowledge of the major myths surrounding both gods and heroes but also gain an appreciation of the variety of approaches to understanding and interpreting them, exploring questions of the universality, transferability, and common inheritance of myths across cultures. Readings are drawn from ancient texts and from modern critical works.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 231 - Greek Religion


    Covers the period from the Bronze Age up to and including the Hellenistic era. The following topics are considered: the phenomenon of anthropomorphism; the connection between mythology and ritual; the status of the dead; the function of the sanctuary; the role of the priest and the seer; hero-worship; evidence for human sacrifice; ecstasy, madness, and possession; the place of religion within the Greek city-state; prayers, curses, and inherited guilt; festivals and spectacles; pollution-belief; Orphism; the rise of mystery religions; and the relationship between Olympian and chthonian religion.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 233 - Greek Art


    Surveys the pre-Hellenic, archaic, classical, and Hellenistic art and architecture of Greece with a special emphasis on the political, social, and religious contexts in which art was produced and how it reflects the ideas and concerns of the ancient Greeks, both individually and collectively.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 234 - Archaeology of Greece


    An introduction to Minoan, Mycenaean, and Greek civilizations, including a survey of major sites and monuments. Attention is given to ways in which arguments are developed from the archaeological record.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 235 - Archaeology of Italy


    An introduction to the archaeology of the Italian peninsula from earliest prehistoric to late imperial times, including the major sites and monuments of native Italic cultures, Greek and Phoenician colonization, Etruscan civilization, Rome, and Pompeii. Attention is given to the ways in which arguments are developed from the archaeological record.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 236 - Greek History


    The history of ancient Greece from the Archaic period to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Through readings of Herodotus and Thucydides, emphasis is placed on political and social developments at Athens and Sparta, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, and the events that led to the rise of Alexander’s empire.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: May be taken for history major credit.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 237 - Roman History


    The history of ancient Rome from its foundation through the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Emphasis is placed on political, constitutional, and social developments.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Recommended: May be taken for history major credit.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 240 - World Archaeology, Material Culture, and Identity


    From Neolithic settlements to the great cities of the ancient world, such as Uruk, Mohenjo Daro, Pompeii, Copan, and Teotihuacan, and encompassing Native American remains in our local central New York environment, this interdisciplinary course offers a global study of archaeology and focuses on the role of material culture in shaping human identity. The course entertains questions such as, how did the world’s first great cities come to be? Where did writing come from? Why did ancient people all over the world revere their dead? What ends did human sacrifice serve? What are the lessons of archaeology regarding the human transformation of the environment? Perspectives on these issues are offered by faculty who specialize in a wide range of facets of the study of archaeology in different cultures of the world.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ANTH 240  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 250 - The Ancient Roman City


    Private and public life in the urban centers of Roman Italy forms the focus of this course. It traces the history of the city of Rome, with all of its political, economic, social, and religious institutions, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to the end of the Roman Empire in the 4th century CE. Students acquire a basic knowledge of the political and social history of Rome while discussing many of the ancient written sources that have a bearing on the subject of the private and public lives of Romans. Readings include Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Juvenal, Petronius, Pliny the Younger, and Suetonius. Through the different approaches of archaeological, epigraphical, art historical, topographical, environmental, and historical studies, students become acquainted with the material culture of the ancient Roman city. Emphasis is placed on Rome, the capital itself, and the prosperous towns on the Bay of Naples, Herculaneum and Pompeii, that were destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: LATN 122  or LATN 123  or LATN 201  or LATN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 250E - The Ancient Roman City (Extended Study)


    Through direct study of the material culture of Rome and the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, the course investigates what life was like for men, women, and children of every socio-economic class: from the grandiose villas and urban palaces to the physical spaces where Roman urban life developed and made its fundamental contribution to western civilization.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: CLAS 250 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 251 - The Ancient Greek City


    Provides an introduction to the history of ancient Greece and development of the Greek city-state, or polis, with a special focus on Athens. Students learn about the importance of the study of material remains for tracing the rise of Bronze Age and later Iron Age centers. Through a combined study of literary and historical texts, archaeology, and epigraphy, students gain an understanding of the social, political, economic, and religious institutions that shaped the ancient Greek city-state and provided a foundation for many later developments of western civilization. An interdisciplinary approach is applied to exploring the structures that defined the identity of the individual within a single polity as well as within the broader Pan-Hellenic context.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GREK 122  or GREK 201  or GREK 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 251E - The Ancient Greek City (Extended Study)


    The extended study introduces students at first hand to the physical settings where Greek urban life developed and made its fundamental contribution to western civilization. During the three weeks that students are based in Athens, they observe and interpret the evidence that material culture provides for understanding the social, political, and religious institutions that shaped the ancient Greek city-state, a subject that they have studied on-campus in the course CLAS 251. The extended study places special emphasis on how material culture illuminates the ways in which these varied institutions defined the identity of an individual within the ancient Greek city and in a broader Pan-Hellenic context.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: CLAS 251  
    Prerequisites: GREK 122  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 252 - Crete: Imaginary Pasts


    Focuses on the Greek island of Crete to consider how the construction of identity depends on an imaginary past. Ancient Greece posited for itself an even more ancient past located on the island of Crete. The myths and stories sited on Crete (e.g., the births of Zeus and Hera, the stories of Daedalus and Icarus, Pasiphae and the Minotaur, Theseus and Ariadne) ponder the nature of the divine, the polity, creativity, and eros - topics crucial to the fashioning of a self. Course readings include selections from Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Xenophon’s Symposium, Plato’s Laws, Euripides’ Hippolytus, Euripides’ Bacchae, Diodorus Siculus’s Library, and Plutarch’s Lives.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 253 - Excavating Ancient Greeks and Romans in Southern Italy


    The voyage of Odysseus is a mythic reflection of the exploration of the western Mediterranean that gathered full momentum in the 9th c. BCE, as both Phoenicians and Greeks plied new trade routes in search of metals and founded settlements in search of arable land. The Greek foundations in southern Italy and Sicily grew to be among the most wealthy and powerful centers of the classical world and, in turn, had a profound influence on the burgeoning city of Rome. Focuses on how the interdisciplinary field of archaeology has illuminated much of the history of the Greeks in Italy and their relationship with native Italic populations.

    Credits: 1
    Corequisite:   
    Prerequisites:   or   or    or higher-level Greek course
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 253E - Excavating Ancient Greeks and Romans in Southern Italy (Extended Study)


    This extended study allows students to approach the history and achievements of the western Greeks through direct examination of physical settings and material culture. Students first travel to several of the main archaeological sites in Sicily and southern Italy that they have studied in the spring semester seminar,  , and then participate in archaeological excavations that lie in the shadow of some of the most impressive temples built by the ancient Greeks at Paestum.

    Credits: 0.5
    Corequisite:   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 401 - Senior Seminar in the Classics


    This senior seminar focuses on proficiency in Greek and/or Latin, on competence in conducting research in classical studies, and on developing an understanding of and appreciation for the reception of classical literature and art.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 490 - Honors


    Independent study, open to candidates for honors.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • CLAS 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Computer Science

  
  • COSC 100 - Computers in the Arts and Sciences


    Introduces students to the inner workings of computers, the Internet, the Web. Students learn to create a well-designed web page; build a website; perform regression analysis; analyze a small social network; etc. Students spend two weeks on the notion of data modeling, build simple but useful financial models, and in the process learn the basics of financial literacy. There are several lab assignments and two group projects, one to build a website on the subject of choice, the other to analyze a social network. No computer experience is required. The course does not count toward the major.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: CORE 126S  
    Corequisite: COSC 100L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: No Computer Science/Mathematics, Computer Science Majors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 100L - Computers in the Arts and Sciences Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 100 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 100 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 101 - Introduction for Computing I


    An introduction to computer science through the study of programming utilizing the programming language Python. Topics include program control, modular design, recursion, fundamental data structures including lists and maps, and a variety of problem-solving techniques.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 101L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Recommended: Recommended for students in all disciplines who desire a rigorous introduction to computers and programming.
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 101L - Introduction for Computing I Lab


    A weekly two-hour laboratory provides the opportunity to develop programming and design skills. Required corequisite to COSC 101.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 101 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 102 - Introduction for Computing II


    A continuation of COSC 101 and the first course in the major. Develops advanced programming topics such as abstract data types and algorithms and their analyses. Abstract data structures may include lists, stacks, queues, and maps. The concepts of information hiding, data abstraction, and modular design are emphasized. Object-oriented programming is used throughout.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 102L  
    Prerequisites: COSC 101   or equivalent programming experience. 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 102L - Introduction for Computing II Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 102. This weekly two-hour laboratory includes the design and implementation of programs that illustrate the topics of the course.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 102 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 140 - Developing Web Applications


    The goal of this course is to introduce students to how modern web applications are designed and created. Through lecture, discussion, and programming assignments, student learn programming constructs in Python, including variables and types, control flow, objects and classes; web front-end technologies such as HTML and CSS; and the Django web application framework. In addition to core software engineering and design topics, this course considers issues related to accessibility, sensitivity to culture and locale, and security and privacy. No prior programming experience is required. This course does not count toward the major.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 140L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: No Computer Science/Mathematics, Computer Science Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 140L - Developing Web Applications Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 140 . A weekly two-hour laboratory provides the opportunity to develop practical programming and design skills.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 140 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 201 - Computer Organization


    A study of the fundamental concepts of computer architecture. Topics include the representation of information, components of the computer and how they interact, microarchitecture and microprogramming, conventional machine and assembly language, and advanced architectures. Several types of computer design are reviewed; an ARM architecture is the subject of detailed study.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 201L  
    Prerequisites: COSC 102   (may be taken concurrently) 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 201L - Computer Organization Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 201 . The laboratory is used to examine how different components of a computer’s architecture can affect its performance.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 201 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 202 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    Introduces foundational methods in the design and analysis of information-processing and problem-solving techniques. Asymptotic time and space complexity are used as an evaluation framework throughout. Data structures include maps, trees, and heaps. Algorithmic approaches include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and dealing with intractability. Graphs are used extensively, and important graph problems and their algorithms are examined closely.

    Credits: 1
    Corequisite: COSC 202L
    Prerequisites: COSC 102
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 202L - Data Struct and Algorithms Lab


    A weekly two-hour laboratory in which students develop and practice skills for algorithmic reasoning, design, and analysis and improve mathematical and technical writing through a variety of collaborative exercises.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 202
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 208 - Introduction to Computer Systems


    A study of the hardware and software infrastructure computer applications depend on. Topics include the C programming language, data storage and representation, hardware organization, assembly, memory locality and caching, multiprocessing and synchronization, and networking.

    Credits: 1
    Corequisite: COSC 208L
    Prerequisites: COSC 102
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 208L - Introduction to Computer Systems Lab


    A weekly two-hour laboratory that focuses on the design, implementation, and analysis of computer systems and the applications that depend on them.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 208
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 290 - Discrete Structures


    Introduces discrete computational structures, methods, and concepts utilized throughout computer science. Topics may include types, relations, functions, equivalence and congruence relations, recursion, order relations, partially ordered sets, lattices, Boolean algebras, logic, semi-groups, monoids, morphisms, languages, graphs, trees, finite state machines, counting, and probability.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 290L  
    Prerequisites: COSC 102  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 290L - Discrete Structures Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 290 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 290 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 301 - Operating Systems


    Introduces students to the study of operating systems. Topics include the hardware/software interface, scheduling, resource allocation, memory and storage management, the scope and nature of services provided to applications, and system performance evaluation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 301L  
    Prerequisites:   
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 301L - Operating Systems Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 301 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 301 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 302 - Analysis of Algorithms


    Provides a conceptual framework within which both theoretical and concrete analyses of computer algorithms may be developed. Topics to be covered include: time and space complexity; graph algorithms; problem-solving techniques including divide-and-conquer, greedy algorithms, and dynamic programming; intractability; and approximation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 302L  
    Prerequisites: COSC 290  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Previous completion of COSC 290  is strongly recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 302L - Analysis of Algorithms Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 302.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 302  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 304 - Theory of Computing


    Introduces the different models of computation and focuses attention on the relative strength of each model and the relationship of one model to another. Concepts introduced include type theory, finite automata, regular expressions and languages, context-free grammars, push-down automata, Turing machines and their schema, diagonalization arguments, Church’s Thesis, the Halting problem, and computational complexity.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: COSC 304L  
    Prerequisites: COSC 290  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 304L - Theory of Computing Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 304.

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: COSC 304 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 415 - Software Engineering


    Introduces students to the practice of software engineering by creating software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications. An integral part of the course is for students working in small groups to take a Saas project from conception through planning, development, testing, and deployment. Student groups are normally paired with a local non-profit with a need that can be addressed through a new or modified Saas application. The project will be developed using a modern application framework (e.g., Ruby on Rails) and deployed using a cloud provider such as Heroku. Through the course and project, students will learn and use Agile methodologies and tools, including user stories, behavior- and test- driven development, pair programming, version control for team-based development, and continuous integration. Moreover, students will learn and apply fundamental programming constructs and techniques including design patterns for software architecture, higher-order functions, metaprogramming, and reflection, to improve the maintainability, modularity and reusability of their code.

    Credits: 1
    Corequisite: COSC 415L
    Prerequisites: COSC 202 or COSC 208 or COSC 301
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 415L - Software Engineering Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 425.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 415
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 420 - Programming Languages


    Surveys the salient features of diverse programming languages and examines the foundations and principles of language design. Topics include formal description of language syntax, ambiguity, storage allocation, parameter linkage, and current issues in language design.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 420L  
    Prerequisites:  COSC 290    
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 420L - Programming Languages Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 420.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 420 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 435 - Computer Graphics


    An introduction to the concepts and techniques of interactive computer graphics. A broad spectrum of subjects including picture generation and display, geometry modeling and representation (including hierarchical models), illumination models, ray tracing, and the design of user interfaces are covered.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 435L  
    Prerequisites:   
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 435L - Computer Graphics Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 435 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 435 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 440 - Principles of Design for Large Systems


    Surveys the tools and techniques for the design and implementation of large systems on computers, both local and distributed. The organizational and communications problems associated with large system design are discussed, as well as methods for overcoming these problems.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 440L  
    Prerequisites:    
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 440L - Principles of Design for Large Systems Lab


    Required corequisite to COSC 440 . Students work in teams to design part or all of a large system.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: COSC 440 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • COSC 445 - Parallel and Distributed Computing


    Surveys the field of parallel and distributed computing, covering hardware design and architecture, interconnection networks, and parallel algorithms. In addition to the broad survey, students concentrate on the implementation of message-passing parallel computers and algorithms. This aspect of the course includes laboratory work using the parallel computer laboratory.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: COSC 445L  
    Prerequisites:   
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

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