2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
    May 19, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

Course classifications:

Africa (AF)
Asia (AS)
Europe (EU)
Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)
Middle East (ME)
Transregional (TR)
United States (US)

  
  •  

    HIST 339 - Traditions of European Intellectual History (EU)


    Takes as its subject the main ideas, key figures, philosophical debates, and major literary movements of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. Explores the tensions between tradition and progress, freedom and authority, reason and the unconscious, belief and skepticism, and revolution and non-violence. This is a course about ideas - some vast, dazzling, and groundbreaking, some muddled and misguided - and the historical contexts in which they appeared. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 340 - 20th-Century European Intellectual History (EU)


    At the beginning of the 20th century, European men and women of ideas agreed that the continent was experiencing an unprecedented intellectual crisis, as the optimistic and positivist doctrines of Victorian liberalism began to crumble in the face of radical challenges from left and right alike. This course examines the transformation in European world-views that has occurred during the past 100 years, focusing in particular on such themes as the growth of “cultural despair,” the intellectual impact of the Great War, the New Physics, Gramscian and Lukácsian neo-Marxism, second- and third-wave feminism, existentialism, faith after the Holocaust, the generation of 1968, and the ideas of the Frankfurt School. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 343 - The Formation of the Russian Empire (EU)


    A study of politics and society in the Russian lands from Kiev to Alexander I. Focuses especially on the rise of the Muscovite state, its cultural diversity, and its preoccupation with trade, treason, and winning wars; the Petrine reforms and Russia’s emergence as a European power; the palace coups; and Catherine II and the Enlightenment. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: REST 343  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 344 - Imperial Russia and the Soviet Revolution (EU)


    Russian history from Napoleon’s defeat to the rise of Putin. This course discusses the autocracy of Nicholas I, the Great Reforms, the emergence of revolutionary movements, industrialization and a changing society, the revolutions and the Bolshevik 1920s, the rise of Stalinism, and World War II and the Cold War. A particular theme is the importance and impact of nationalism. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: REST 344  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 346 - Germany and Eastern Europe, 1848 - 1989 (EU)


    Traces the often troubled history of Central and Eastern Europe from the Revolution of 1848 to the fall of the Berlin wall. Topics include the unification of Germany, the collapse of Austria-Hungary, and the emergence of Poland; the two world wars, fascism, and communism; and post-war occupation, division, and dissent. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 350 - Post-War Europe, 1945 to the Present (EU)


    Studies Europe’s changing status in the global community since 1945 and the domestic effects of that change. Topics include the movement toward European Union, the Cold War, decolonization, the rise and fall of Communism, and the emergence of multi-racial Europe. Also explores critiques of material prosperity and consumer culture in the West and the tenacity of nationalism in an era characterized by supra-national ideologies. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 353 - History of the Modern Balkans (EU)


    Examines key episodes in the history of the Balkans from the mid-19th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of different peoples, cultures, and political systems, and on the meaning of Balkan history for European history. Topics include the great powers and their role in the Balkans, the reforms and revolutions of the 19th century, the wars of the 20th century, the varieties of Balkan nationalism, patterns of social and economic change, the nature of Stalinism, the Cold War, and finally, the recent conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 356 - Global Indigenous History (TR)


    Indigenous communities exist throughout the world, but rarely is their history approached in global terms. What does “indigenous” mean, and how does world history look different when approached from the perspective of indigenous people? How does such an approach change the way we think about our national stories, and why does that matter? With these questions in mind, students explore the history of indigenous peoples from around the world, including communities in the United States, Latin America, Pacific island nations, Canada, and Australia. By examining these diverse people’s experiences with outside colonization from the 15th century to the present, students are offered new perspectives on ongoing histories of colonialism, resistance, adaptation, and cultural resilience. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted:   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 358 - Conquest and Colony: Cultural Encounters in the Americas (TR)


    Explores contrasting patterns of colonization the Americas. Traditionally, such comparative studies have focused on the cultural differences among the European colonizers, but here, students pay equal attention to differences among the many indigenous groups that lived in this hemisphere. Rather than treating indigenous peoples as passive players in the political and social struggles of the 16th and 17th centuries, students consider how they actively shaped processes of conquest and colonization. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 360 - Borderlands of North America (TR)


    Instead of looking at history from the vantage of national centers, borderlands history focuses on the complicated places where empires, nations, and Indigenous peoples have collided, converged, and overlapped over time. Borderlands were—and continue to be—perplexing places, where national identities and boundaries often held little sway, and where marginalized peoples sought to forge new paths. A focus on borderlands has the power to change our perspective on the history of North America, and to lend insight into the complex politics that define the border up to the present day, including heated debates over migration and the building of border walls. With this in mind, students examine the history of Indigenous, U.S.-Mexican, U.S-Canadian, and imperial borderlands from the 16th through the 21st centuries, including their political, social, and environmental dimensions. (TR)

    Credits: 1
    Crosslisted: NAST 360
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 365 - Warriors, Emperors and Temples in Japan (AS)


    Examines three very different kinds of Japanese culture and government during the medieval and early modern periods. Study begins with the transforming influences of continental civilization such as Buddhism, Chinese techniques of government, and state building. Students then look at the ways in which these influences were integrated into Japanese society and trace the emergence of the highly refined court culture during the classical Heian period. Next, students explore the erosion of the central government’s power and the rise of the first warrior government, the Kamakura military government, and the new ethos of the “way of the warrior.” Finally, students examine the fate of the samurai in an age when the arts of peace and administration were more critical than skill with a sword.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations, Institutions, and Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 368 - China, the Great Wall, and Beyond (AS)


    Examines key questions in military, cultural, social, and political history in China from 1200 to 1750. In particular, students compare foreign peoples who conquered China, like the Mongols and Manchus, with the last “native” dynasties in Chinese history. Students consider styles of rulership, the impact of war and the military on society, developments in intellectual life, and international relations of the most populous country in the world. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 369 - Modern China (1750 - present) (AS)


    Has a dual focus: China’s internal development during this period and its complex interaction with the newly dominant powers of the West and Japan. Begins with the prosperous “high Qing,” and then turns to the tumultuous Taiping rebellion of the mid-19th century and the political, military, and social changes it engendered. Then, the Chinese efforts to meet the challenges of the new world order first through a Confucian revival and later through embracing Western technology and ideas are examined. Students trace the development of the Chinese Communist party and the KMT, warlordism, China’s involvement in World War II, and the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Concludes with a look at the effects of the economic and political reforms of the past two decades. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 370 - The Mongol Empire (TR)


    Traces the origins and impact of the greatest land empire in history. Late in the 12th century, Ghenghis Khan unified the steppe and assembled an awesome military force. During the next decades, the Mongols conquered most of Eurasia. Students examine steppe military traditions, relations between the steppe and the sown, and the establishment of the Mongol empire. Drawing on eyewitness accounts, historical chronicles, art, and modern scholarship, students explore Mongol methods of rulership in the Middle East, East Asia, and Inner Asia and how a century of Mongol domination reshaped world history. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 377 - History of Culture in the Caribbean (LAC)


    Examines the historical development of diverse creole cultures in the Caribbean, based on a core of neo-African traditions and Amerindian influences, and shaped by the impact of almost five centuries of European cultural imperialism. It explores the cultures of various ethnic groups that co-habited the Caribbean in the wake of European colonization, their separate struggles for cultural autonomy and self-determination, and the emergence of creole cultures to which all contributed. Specific aspects of Caribbean culture are studied to comprehend the process of creolization. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 377  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 379 - U.S. and Africa (AF)


    Examines the history of US-Africa interactions since the 1960s. Following the end of European colonial rule in Africa in the 1960s, the United States stepped in to exert its influence. Newly independent African countries were seen as a great opportunity to promote US economic, political and sociocultural agenda particularly during the Cold War. On the other hand, many African immigrants started to permanently settle in the US following the passage of the 1980 Refugee Act consolidating interactions between the US and Africa. Major themes include: African immigrants & Refugees in the US; Cold War; Public Awareness of African Issues in the US; USAID; Disease Control in Africa; US & Apartheid; War on Extremist Groups; Peace Corps and Humanitarian Interventions. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 380 - Emancipation, Forced Labor, and Contemporary Bondage in Africa (AF)


    Examines the transition from slavery to freedom, forced labor during colonial rule, and contemporary forms of slavery in Africa. One of the moral justifications for the European conquest of Africa was the ending of slavery and slave trade. While colonialism led to the demise of the trade, slavery itself continued to exist well to the end of the colonial era. Finding it difficult to organize labor, the colonial authorities used forced labor with no or little compensation and, since independence modern forms of slavery are still practiced in many parts of the continent. Major themes include: abolition laws and emancipation in practice; colonial rule and the slow attack on slavery; plantation labor in East Africa; slavery as an international issue; forced labor, contemporary human trafficking and migrations. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 381 - Pre-Colonial Africa (AF)


    Surveys African history to 1880: its peoples and their environments, early Islamic North Africa, Bantu expansion, early states of the northern savannas, the kingdom of Ethiopia, the impact of medieval Islam, Europe’s discovery of Africa and the slave trade, and later European missionary and commercial enterprise. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HIST 199  or HIST 299
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 382 - Modern Africa (AF)


    This study of Africa from 1880 to the present includes the following topics: European settlement in South Africa and Rhodesia/Zimbabwe; background to the scramble for the rest of Africa; partition by the European powers; British, French, Portuguese, and Belgian colonial regimes; nationalist resistance movements; “patrimonial” post-independence regimes and growing resistance to them in the 1990s. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 384 - Somalia: From Independence to Collapse (AF)


    Examines the history of modern Somalia from 1960 to the present. Major themes include the partition of Somaliland, Somali resistance; colonial rule in Somaliland; independence and problems of independence; the Siad Barre government; irredentist claims and wars; the collapse of Somalia; international intervention and aftermath; attempts to form a government, Islamic Courts Union, and al-Shabab fighters; and piracy. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 385 - Darfur in Historical Perspective (AF)


    Examines the history of the Darfur crisis. Topics include the people of Darfur, ethnic relations and conflicts, conquest and colonial legacy, Darfur and the Sudan government, the rebels, responses of the Sudan government and Janjaweed, the war, human rights violations, foreign powers, the challenge of humanitarian intervention, and the future of Darfur. Students explore the responsibilities and opportunities we have, as individuals and as a nation, to respond to the refugee migrations, human rights abuses, and genocides that haunted the 20th century and that are beginning to plague the 21st. Exposes students to historical causes of the crisis and some of the humanitarian challenges facing the world today. Also offers multiple frameworks for thinking about what roles we might play in influencing public policy and having an impact on people in need. Students learn to understand and analyze the crisis that the United Nations called “the world’s worst humanitarian disaster” and the United States called “genocide.” (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 399 - Reading Seminars: New Areas of Inquiry


    Offers history students the opportunity to engage in intensive discussion of recent scholarship. Faculty explore new research areas, which will hone students’ skills of critical reading and discussion. Topics and themes will vary based on faculty interests; examples include public history, history of sexuality, material culture, military history, environmental history, or historical justice.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: HIST 199   or HIST 299
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 400 - Thematic Seminar


    Selected topics with thematic focus rather than a geographical focus. The thematic seminar underscores the importance of exploring the diversity and the connections of human experience across space and time, and it aims to support the field of focus pathway within the major.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 450 - Seminar in East Asian History (AS)


    Selected topics in East Asian history from 1350 to 2000. Offerings vary from cultural and intellectual history to diplomatic and military history. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites:
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 459 - Seminar on Modern Middle Eastern History (ME)


    Covers selected topics in the history of the Middle East from 1600 AD, including political and social institutions of the Ottoman Empire, European economic and cultural penetration, and the colonialism and nationalisms that developed from 1798. Although the majority of the assigned readings focus on the territories once belonging to the Ottoman Empire, research on Iran and the Persian Gulf as well as some Central Asian and/or North African territories is allowed. Students become familiar with the major historiographical debates in the field and are expected to refer to them in their independent research projects. (ME)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HIST 105  or HIST 359   or equivalent experience
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 462 - Seminar on Problems in African History (AF)


    Selected topics in African history from the ancient times to the present. Possible topics include African kingdoms and civilizations, expansion of Europe and the conquest of Africa, African resistances to colonialism, decolonization, colonial legacy, socio-economic and political developments in post-independence Africa, ethnic relations and conflicts, modern and indigenous mechanisms of governance. Students become familiar with the major historiographical debates in the field and are expected to refer to them in their research project. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One African history course
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 475 - Seminar in African American History (US)


    Selected problems in African American history, including the civil rights movement and African American intellectual history in the 20th and 21st centuries. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HIST 218  or HIST 318  or HIST 319 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 476 - Seminar on Problems in the 19th-Century United States (US)


    Selected topics in political, social, and cultural history. Possible topics include labor, rights, citizenship, race, religion, empire, gender, and/or sexuality. Students become familiar with the major historiographical debates in the field and are expected to refer to them in their independent research projects. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in US history
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only History Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 479 - Seminar on Problems in the History of U.S. Foreign Policy (US)


    Selected topics, explored through a combination of assigned readings and research in primary sources. Past seminars have included U.S.-East Asia relations in the 20th century, the origins of the Cold War, and the role of culture, race, and gender in U.S. foreign relations. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HIST 215  or HIST 216  or HIST 316   or two courses in US History or international relations 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 482 - Seminar on Problems in British History since 1800 (EU)


    Examines topics in the history of modern Britain and its empire (including pre-independent Ireland). Political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural approaches are included. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: London Study Group

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 484 - Seminar on Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History (EU)


    Examines selected themes and topics in the cultural and intellectual history of Europe from the late 18th century to the present. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in modern European history
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 487 - Seminar on the History of Russia (EU)


    This course focuses on selected topics in Russian history. Past and proposed topics include the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, Russian social history, national minorities in the Russian Empire, Russia and the Cold War, and Russian popular culture. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Background in Russian history
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 489 - Seminar on Problems in Military History (TR)


    Focuses on the role of organized violence in history in the context of military-civil relations and change in military technology and methodology. The period covered is ancient to modern, European and non-Western. Each seminar concentrates on a particular era. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 490 - Honors Seminar in History (TR)


    A seminar for candidates for honors and high honors in history. Students enroll in this seminar to complete or extend a paper already begun in another history course. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only History Majors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Restrictions: Limited to seniors with a history GPA of 3.50 of higher
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Italian

  
  •  

    ITAL 121 - Elementary Italian I


    The ITAL 121, 122 sequence is an introduction to the Italian language that provides a foundation in both spoken and written Italian. ITAL 121 introduces students to the basic structures of the language in a highly interactive way: it emphasizes the mastery of grammatical structures and vocabulary with a strong emphasis on obtaining both communicative and cultural competency. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 122 - Elementary Italian I


    ITAL 122 is a continuation of ITAL 121 designed to increase students’ proficiency in the four skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing Italian by enhancing their mastery of more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students continue to work with conversation partners, but will also incorporate more specific cultural references in oral presentations and in written assignments. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Students with a grade of C– or below in ITAL 122 are urged to repeat the course before continuing.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 195 - Elementary-Level Italian Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 201 - Intermediate Italian


    Designed to improve student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Italian and to expand students’ knowledge of Italian culture. It includes review of basic Italian grammar and introduction to new grammar structures, conversational practice, short compositions, cultural and literary readings, and films. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two or three years of high school Italian, or ITAL 122 , or the equivalent
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Students with previous high school Italian should consult with instructor for proper language placement
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 202 - Intermediate Italian: Language and Literature


    Designed to build proficiency in all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and to improve knowledge of Italian culture. Besides reviewing and improving students’ grammar and vocabulary competency, this course will focus on the reading of short works of Italian literature, short compositions, and class discussions. Students will engage with a wide variety of literary and nonliterary materials, such as books, newspapers, magazines, and videos. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: ITAL 201   Three to four years of high school Italian or ITAL 201  Students with more than four years of high school Italian should consult the instructor regarding placement. 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 223 - Introduction to Italian Cinema


    An introduction to major works of Italian cinema from Neorealism to contemporary productions. Students will watch and discuss groundbreaking films by Italian directors such as Rossellini, Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, Wertmüller, Benigni, and others. Places Italian cinema within the context of European art cinema and film theory, and focuses on the ways these films represent diverse Italian historical and cultural situations. It emphasizes the study of cinematic analysis and filmmaking techniques, as well as the historical and cultural situation in Italy from World War II to the present. Students are required to attend weekly screenings in addition to regular class meetings. Taught in English, with the option of a discussion group in Italian.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite:   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ITAL 223L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to ITAL 223 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: ITAL 223 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ITAL 226 - Venice and Italy (Study Group)


    Enduring for more than a thousand years, the Venetian Republic was one of the longest-lasting political entities in Europe. During its prime, it was the dominant naval and economic power in the eastern Mediterranean, and the major conduit for goods and ideas between the Muslim world and Western Christendom. This course traces the rise and fall of this remarkable maritime empire, its relation to the rest of Italy, and its lasting cultural contributions.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ITAL 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ITAL 295 - Intermediate-Level Italian Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ITAL 353 - Introduction to the Study of Italian Literature: Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature


    Offers a close reading of the most representative works of outstanding Italian writers from the early 1900s to the present. Focuses on questions of aesthetics, national identity, politics, gender, and race as well as on the special relationship between texts and society. Students discuss both canonical works of Italian literature from the Risorgimento (1860) to the present as well as migration literature (from and to Italy), which continually questions the parameters of national identity. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Italian or ITAL 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


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    ITAL 354 - Modern Italian Culture


    Critically introduces students to the very diverse facets of modern and contemporary Italian culture. Students engage with a wide variety of literary and nonliterary texts, such as books, newspapers, music, theatrical works, films, etc. Aims at investigating the concept of Italian identity in its relationship to issues of class, gender, race, and ethnicity. Students enhance their linguistic skills through reading materials, the writing of compositions, listening activities and oral productions. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: ITAL 201  or at least four years of high school Italian
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ITAL 361 - Advanced Grammar, Composition, and Conversation


    Provides a review of grammatical principles with emphasis on correctness and style in composition in Italian. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Italian or ITAL 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements
    Formerly: ITAL 301


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 395 - Advanced-Level Italian Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    ITAL 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Japanese

  
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    JAPN 121 - Elementary Japanese I


    Introduces the four basic skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive aural-oral practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and about 100 Kanji (characters) are introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 122 - Elementary Japanese II


    Builds on speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills acquired in  . Emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive aural-oral practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. New kanji are acquired over the course of the semester.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 121  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 123 - Intensive Japanese I


    This intensive course, taught eight hours per week for the first seven weeks of the semester, covers the materials presented in JAPN 121  at an accelerated pace; it introduces the four basic skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive aural-oral practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and about 100 Kanji (characters) are introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition. Successful completion of both JAPN 123 & JAPN 124  qualifies students for the Japan Study Group in the fall.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester when there is sufficient demand

    Corequisite: JAPN 124  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 124 - Intensive Japanese II


    This intensive course, taught eight hours per week for the second seven weeks of the semester, covers the materials presented in JAPN 122  at an accelerated pace; it introduces the four basic skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive aural-oral practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and about 100 Kanji (characters) are introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition. Successful completion of both JAPN 123  & 124 qualifies students for the Japan Study Group in the fall.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester when there is sufficient demand

    Corequisite: JAPN 123  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 195 - Elementary-Level Japanese Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language course taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 201 - Intermediate Japanese I


    The first semester of intermediate-level study of Japanese, this course completes the presentation of basic structures of the language. There is continued emphasis on oral communication, with practice in reading simple texts and acquisition of an additional 500 Chinese characters by the end of the term.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 122  or JAPN 124  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 202 - Intermediate Japanese II


    The second semester of intermediate-level study of Japanese, this course completes the presentation of basic structures of the language. There is continued emphasis on oral communication, with practice in reading simple texts and acquisition of an additional 500 Chinese characters by the end of the term.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 222 - Japan through Literature and Film


    Introduces representative modern and pre-modern works of Japanese literature in English translation, as well as modern works of Japanese film.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: JAPN 222L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 222L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to JAPN 222 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: JAPN 222 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 233 - Japanese Popular Culture and Media


    Examines how media are rooted in popular cultures and popular cultures in media. Students will draw on media theories from Japan and elsewhere, critically evaluating those theories and applying them to a range of primary materials, including Japanese graphic narrative, literature, animation, film, song, and music as a way to think about the ideologies that affect how popular cultures and media interact. Students will articulate their own positions about the contexts that inform the creation, circulation, and consumption of representations in and of Japan. This course is taught in English.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 250 - East Asian Thought


    Introduces several classics of East Asian thought, familiar to every educated person in Japan, China, and Korea. Like CORE 151 /CORE 152  readings, these books are about human nature and what it means to be human. They are cultural expressions of timeless value and enriching resources for human fruition. Readings include major Confucian and Taoist texts, selections from Mahayana Buddhist writings, and Japanese classes on aesthetics. Taught in English.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: CHIN 250  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: CORE 151  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 251 - Intermediate Japanese III


    This is an intensive course designed to facilitate student participation in a variety of study group contexts, including individual study and research. Emphasis is on oral comprehension, honorifics, social contexts, and reading and writing skills.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 255 - Hidden Japan: Tea Ceremony


    “The way of tea,” chanoyu or chado/sado , was established by Sen no Rikyu in the 16th century in Japan, with “harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility” (wa kei sei jaku) as its principles. Chanoyu is the most direct practice of Zen Buddhism tradition, and many samurai warriors practiced it as part of the martial arts education. Students learn to realize the principles of chanoyu in a concrete and ritualistic way of making and receiving a bowl of maccha whisked tea. Assigned readings, along with hands-on practice, help students learn the Japanese tradition, art, aesthetics, calligraphy, literature, history, philosophy, and architecture. At the end of the course, students create and perform a tea ceremony in small groups, write a final paper that reflects on their performance and relates their experience to their modern lives as well as to their own cultural backgrounds. Students learn how the apparent universal concepts such as purity, tranquility, and mindfulness are attained through different sets of human behavior, and examine the human diversity and global interconnections reflected in cultural and artistic expression over time and space. The course is taught in English. Students will consume maccha tea and Japanese confectionery.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 255L - Hidden Japan: Tea Ceremony Lab


    Required co-requisite for JAPN 255.

    Credits: 0
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JAPN 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 301 - Advanced Japanese I


    Increasing emphasis on written Japanese, with acquisition by the end of the term of an additional 500 Chinese characters.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 202 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 302 - Advanced Japanese II


    Increasing emphasis on written Japanese, with guided practice in reading unedited modern texts.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 301  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 351 - Advanced Japanese III


    Intensive course designed to facilitate student participation in a variety of study group contexts, including individual study and research. Emphasis is on oral comprehension, honorifics, social contexts, and reading and writing skills.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JAPN 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JAPN 395 - Advanced-Level Japanese Lang


    Advanced-level language course taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JAPN 401 - Readings in Japanese I


    Focuses on reading in literary and non-literary modern texts and mastery of the remaining Chinese characters on the jōyō kanji list of 1,945 characters.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 302  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 402 - Readings in Japanese II


    Focuses on reading in literary and non-literary modern texts and mastery of the remaining Chinese characters on the jōyō kanji list of 1,945 characters.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 302  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 411 - Topics in Japanese Linguistics


    Explores linguistic issues often encountered when learning Japanese as a second language. Topics include dialectical variations and their geographic and linguistic significance in Japan, variations in the use of Japanese by different generations, foreign accent, and factors affecting success or failure for learning Japanese as a second language. Includes lectures, discussions, and hands-on exercises such as acoustic analysis of Japanese spoken by native and non-native speakers. Texts and class discussion are mostly in English but knowledge of modern standard Japanese for everyday use is assumed. Also designed for students to develop ideas for senior research projects.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 450 - Advanced Readings in Japanese


    Focuses on readings from different fields such as anthropology, history, linguistics, and literature, depending on student interest. Class discussions are conducted entirely in Japanese.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: When there is sufficient demand

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 402  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 451 - Readings in Japanese II (Study Group)


    Intensive course designed to facilitate student participation in a variety of study group contexts, including individual study and research. Emphasis is on oral comprehension, honorifics, social contexts, and reading and writing skills.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 455 - Advanced Grammar in Japanese


    Focuses on a systematic study of advanced grammar necessary for oral and written communication in Japanese at the native speaker level. At this level of advanced study, possibilities of one-on-one correspondences between Japanese and English are few, and simply consulting dictionaries could easily result in insufficient or misleading information. Grammar structures that appear beyond JAPN 402 are covered and extended so that students understand systematic and comprehensive usages. Students concentrate on these kinds of advanced grammar patterns through textbooks and authentic reading materials, and learn to use them actively, accurately, and systematically in context. In addition, the study of kanji characters and vocabulary accompanies the study of grammar in order to reach the native-level fluency.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: JAPN 302  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 481 - Topics in Japanese Culture (Study Group)


    Offered in a field of the study group director’s expertise. Takes advantage of museums, libraries, and historical sites in and around Kyoto, as well as guest lectures by Japanese and Western experts, to enrich classroom instruction

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 482 - Cultural Studies: The Japanese Village (Study Group)


    This study group course examines the foundations of Japanese social interaction through a series of readings, guest lectures, and discussions, followed by several weeks of intensive study and documentation of life in one or more village settings.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JAPN 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JAPN 499 - Special Studies for Honors


    Students pursuing honors research enroll in this course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Jewish Studies

  
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    JWST 181 - The Many Faces of Israel


    Introduction to the rich tapestry of cultures and peoples who live in contemporary Israel. Looking at the experiences of immigrant communities-Jews from Poland, Morocco, India, Russia, Ethiopia, etc., this course will discuss ethnicity, acculturation, and mobility in Israel. A consideration of film, literature, and scholarly accounts from a range of disciplines will allow students to explore both those who are at the center and at the periphery of Israeli society.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 204 - Jewish Fiction since the Holocaust


    Covers representative works of fiction by Italian, French, English, Russian, Hungarian, American, Canadian, and Israeli Jewish writers. Not all nationalities are covered in the syllabus for any given year. Discussion centers on a close analysis of the novels, comparing individual and national responses to the Jewish 20th-century experience. By including fiction written across Europe, North America, and Israel, while limiting the time frame to the years following World War II, the question of whether there exists one or more approaches to fiction that are characteristically Jewish is addressed. All readings are in English translation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 208 - The Hebrew Bible in America


    The Bible is not only the best-selling book in America, but is arguably the book that has most profoundly shaped the United States. This course is an introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in its American contexts, particularly American public life. In reading the Hebrew Bible, students ask themselves how these scriptures have shaped American politics, culture, history, and literature. Who has used the Bible and how? To whom does the Bible now speak, and what does it say? In what sense is the Bible understood to be an American text? This course presumes no knowledge of the Christian or Jewish Bibles.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 208 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 213 - The Bible as/and Literature


    What role does literary art play in the shaping of biblical narrative? How does the construction of the sacred text reflect its theological meaning? The religious vision of the Bible is given depth and subtlety precisely by being conveyed literarily; thus, the primary concern in this course is with the literature and literary influence of the received text of the Bible rather than with the history of the text’s creation. As students read through the canon they establish the boundaries of the texts studied, distinguish the type(s) of literature found in them, examine their prose and poetic qualities, and identify their surface structures. Students also consider the literary legacy of the Bible and the many ways that subsequent writers have revisited its stories.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 213  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 222 - Comparative Scripture


    Comparative scriptural analysis or what is now called “Scriptural Reasoning.” The focus will be on close readings of the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and Qur’an with an eye to common themes and differences. Students will engage in a comparison of interpretive traditions in Judaism, Christianity and Islam to see how particular scriptural passages are understood in the religious traditions. The course will also spend time studying the ways in which scriptural reasoning has been used as a form of religious conflict resolution and peace-building in situations of conflict in the UK and Middle East.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 222 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    JWST 228 - Jerusalem: City of Gods


    An introduction to the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In learning about the three Abrahamic religions and their sacred spaces, students are exposed to key themes in the study of religion (scripture and interpretation, feasting and fasting, pilgrimage, sanctuary and sacred space, ritual and worship) and to the particular theme of each religion’s conceptions of Jerusalem. The course foregrounds the ways that each tradition understands the city as a symbol–as a holy city, a city of God, a centre of the cosmos. As importantly, it explores how religion is lived within the city’s sacred geography, investigating the religious practices and sacred sites of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in Jerusalem.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 228 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 242 - Antisemitism, past and present


    Examines the enduring problem of antisemitism in its religious and racial manifestations. Students consider scriptural texts as well as memoirs, fiction, visual art, and diatribes from numerous cultures (material from the 19th Century onwards is primarily from Europe, Russia/USSR, and the United States).

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements
    Formerly: JWST/RELG 344


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 250 - Jewish Identity in the Modern World: Stories, Documents, Lives


    Over the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries, many Jews moved from a world bound by religious observance to a revolutionary re-imagining of their identities. Some of these revolutionary new belief systems (Marxism, Zionism, Freudianism) were as powerful and demanding as the religion their proponents had abandoned. Some of them had lasting and, in the case of Bolshevism, still controversial effects on modem history. Students will examine Jewish patterns of behavior in the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings include Sholem Aleichem, Kafka, Babel, and Oz, in addition to a variety of historical sources.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 251 - Faith after the Holocaust


    The death of six million Jews at the hands of the Nazis in the Second World War represents a radical challenge to faith in Judaism, in Christianity, and in humanism. Study begins with a historical overview of the Holocaust and uses accounts of Holocaust survivors to articulate the challenge of the Holocaust to faith. Then students review philosophical and theological responses to this challenge by a variety of Jewish, Christian, and secular authors.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 251  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 283 - Experiencing Judaism


    Judaism is a dynamic religious tradition that has developed many forms during a more than 3000-year history that has spanned nearly the entire globe. Students in this course consider how Jewish communities from the biblical period to the present day have shaped their practices and beliefs within their own specific historical circumstances. Students read primary sources such as the Bible, the Talmud, the Zohar, midrashim, prayers, response literature, and philosophical and theological discussions. In an effort to understand the ways in which Jews have lived their lives religiously, students explore how Jewish self-identity, textual traditions, and religious practices combine to define “Judaism.”

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 283  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 308 - End of the World


    An examination of the origins and development of apocalyptic literature, much of which deals with the end of the world, during the Second Temple and early Christian periods. This course focuses on primary source texts in translation as well as the theoretical and methodological problems surrounding the analysis of ancient texts for the development of the worldview known as apolcalpyticism. Modern case studies are analyzed as comparative examples throughout the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 308  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 329 - The Politics of Nationalism and Memory in Eastern Europe (Extended Study)


    How is history used to advance state-building and nation-building projects? What role do forgetting and memory play in politics? How do international forces interact with domestic political movements? This extended study course uses Vilnius, the current capital of Lithuania, as a case for studying the politics of nationalism and memory, which so shaped its history and which continue to inform its politics and culture today.

    Credits: 1
    Crosslisted: POSC 329
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 339 - Modern Jewish Philosophy


    A course on European and American Jewish thought, covering a spectrum of liberal and traditional figures. The course studies the ways in which Jewish thinkers have responded to the challenges of modern philosophy, religious pluralism, and feminism. Modern reformulations of traditional Jewish ideas and religious practices are discussed as well as contemporary theological exchanges between Jews and Christians. Readings are taken from such figures as Mendelssohn, Buber, Rosenzweig, Heschel, Fackenheim, and Plaskow.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: RELG 339 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    JWST 344 - Antisemitism, past and present


    Examines the enduring problem of antisemitism in its religious and racial manifestations. Students consider scriptural texts as well as memoirs, fiction, visual art, and diatribes from numerous cultures (material from the 19th Century onwards is primarily from Europe, Russia/USSR, and the United States).

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


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    JWST 354 - On Tyranny


    Examines life under tyranny – Soviet and Nazi – as distilled through the fiction of Russian/East European and Jewish writers who experienced it firsthand. An intertwining of political and private life from the inception of a new regime, with many people exuberantly hopeful, through the various stages of acquiescence, resistance, escape, and sometimes death. Readings include Timothy Snyder’s essay On Tyranny, stories, novels, and poems by Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Babel, Vasily Grossman, Kundera, and Nabokov.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: REST 354  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


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    JWST 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    JWST 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

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