2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
    Jul 14, 2024  
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Peace and Conflict Studies

  
  • PCON 314 - Media War: Peace and Conflict in the Digital Age


    The first purpose of the course is to demonstrate the central importance of media in defining the reality of war, peace, and violence in modern culture. The second goal is to introduce, in a selective manner, film, art, and written works that shaped these definitions. The primary framework is chronological, beginning with a survey of images of war and peace in art, covering in detail World War I and World War II, and ending with current images of war and of preparations for nuclear war. The secondary framework distinguishes types or degrees of war: World War I and World War II, civil wars (Spain) and genocide (the Armenians, the Jews in Europe); struggles of national liberation (Vietnam and Algeria); and prospects of global holocaust, this last creating new imagery - both positive and negative - in art, poetry, fiction, and film.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 322 - Weapons and War: Interdisciplinary Perspectives


    Mustard gas, airpower, submarines, A-bombs, Agent Orange, landmines, terror wars, “Star Wars”: weapons technology profoundly shaped the science, politics, and culture of the last century. This course explores the myriad effects of the production, deployment, and use of weapons. Specifically, the course considers how the horizons of science and technology have been shaped by the quest for ever-more-powerful or -sophisticated weaponry; how the creation of new weapons changes the nature of war and peace; how new weapons may impact lives and the planet; terror as a weapon, and scientific and social responses to it; the role of media images in the public consciousness of weaponry and war; and impacts of the global arms trade. While critically theorizing the social, environmental, and philosophical impacts of war over the past century, the course also examines the place of global ethics in discussions about weapons and war.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PCON 111  or PCON 218  or ANTH 218  or SOAN 218 or PCON 225  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 327 - Australia’s Stolen Generations: The Legacies of Carrolup (Extended Study)


    The intellectual goal of this extended study course is to address issues of both population vulnerabilities and cultural resilience by considering Aborigines in Australia, and specifically engaging the historical geography and the contemporary experience of the Noongar community in Western Australia. Three themes form the curricular program of the extended study. (1) Students will study the historical geography of Aborigines in Australia within the context of European colonization and settlement, federation and nation-building. These issues will be framed using concepts of population vulnerability, environmental impact, and cultural heritage and identity at the national, regional and local geographic scales. (2) Students study the impacts of national, regional and local policies directed toward indigenous peoples on Aboriginal families and children, given particular focus to programs concerning part-Aboriginal children, Australia’s Stolen Generations. (3) Students learn the ways in which Aboriginal culture and “care for country” has remained resilient across time, space, and generations.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted: GEOG 327  
    Corequisite: GEOG 319  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 329 - Environmental Security


    About how the environment poses one of the most important security threats of the 21st century. From an interdisciplinary perspective, introduces students to the different ways that climate change and environmental problems more generally are presenting new kinds of security threats. In many ways, greater environmental concern from governments and international organizations over the dramatic environmental changes afoot in the world is a welcome development. But will the “environmental security” framework reinforce global inequalities and maintain the status quo? Or might it mean rethinking the very foundations of what we mean by “security”?

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: GEOG 329  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Sophomore, No First-Year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 340 - Terror and Counter - Terror: Histories and Logics of Asymmetric Warfare


    For as long as empires and states have been going to war, people have been fighting them with the tactics and technologies now known as terrorism and guerrilla warfare. Asymmetric warfare, however, is no mere historical artifact. It dominates headlines as much as it confounds leaders around the world. Central to this course are several in depth case studies of counter-insurgency and terrorism, including France in Algeria and Indochina; the British in Malaya, East Africa and Northern Ireland; state terrorism in Latin America during the Cold War; and the United States in the Philippines, Vietnam, and, after September 11, 2001, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq. The evolution of non-state terrorism — from the violent acts of Anarchists in the late 19th Century to the potentially apocalyptic terrorism of radical religious groups the early 21st Century — also comes under scrutiny. From Clausewitz to General Petraeus, from Mao Zedong to Ayman Al-Zawahiri, this class explores how asymmetric war is lived and understood by various observers and participants.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PCON 111  or PCON 218  or ANTH 218  or SOAN 218 or PCON 225 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 341 - War and the Shaping of American Politics


    Examines the impact of warfare, expansion, and national security policy on the development of domestic American institutions and politics since the Revolution. War’s impact has been multifaceted and contradictory, fueling a politics of reaction and repression in many contexts while serving as a catalyst for advances in political, racial, and economic equality and inclusion in others. Students will explore those contradictions by connecting war mobilization and security politics to the trajectory of American political development and state/society relations over time. Topics include: the role of the putatively weak American state in shaping 19th century territorial expansion; the effect of wartime mobilization and participation on racial politics; the interplay of warfare and the welfare state in American history; the postwar politics of the “military-industrial complex;” and the impact of foreign policy and national security on the American party system. Readings will engage such topics from the perspective of political scientists, sociologists, and historians working on a broad empirical terrain ranging over several centuries.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted:   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 345 - Transitional and Historical Justice


    In what ways and under what conditions do states pursue justice for past wrongs? Is democracy credible without confronting the abuses of previous regimes? Do programs for transitional and historical justice unwittingly mask or even perpetuate injustice by recognizing certain types and forms of violence, while ignoring others? Students examine the theories and practices of transitional and historical justice since 1945. A global line-up of case studies are presented, which students evaluate in a comparative framework. Specific topics include Post-WWII Germany, Latin America, South Africa, Rwanda, Eastern Europe after 1989, Cambodia, Australia, and the United States.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 351 - The Israel/Palestine Conflict


    Focuses on the longstanding struggle between Israelis and Palestinians, as well as on the history of the way the conflict has been defined (e.g., an Arab-Israeli conflict, a religious war between Jews and Muslims, etc.). The course profiles episodes in the history of the conflict–and of the efforts to resolve it–in light of contemporary developments across the globe. The war of 1948 is analyzed in light of decolonization struggles following WWII, just as the “Six-Day War” of 1967 is studied in light of Cold War politics. In addition to focusing on flashpoints in the history of the conflict, the course also examines international agendas for ending it. Repeated US efforts to broker a peace are analyzed in light of geopolitical developments elsewhere. Students will become well-versed in the historical and social developments of the conflict and study the various treaties, armistice agreements, and memoranda that have guided efforts to bring it to a conclusion. They also study outstanding issues in the contest between Israel and the Palestinian Authority, as well as current peace and armistice proposals.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: MIST 351 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PCON 355 - Rwanda since the 1994 Genocide


    Assesses the Rwandan experience of post-conflict reconstruction and reconciliation to ask how sustainable is the country’s post-genocide recovery? Principally concerned with understanding how to do field research in difficult settings such as post-genocide Rwanda. Using the ‘do no harm’ framework of doing research with individuals who have lived through mass violence, students are equipped to undertake research in foreign field settings beyond the Rwandan case. In particular, students learn to design a ‘human subjects’ research proposal, rooted in The Belmont Report of ethical research and guidelines for research involving human subjects. Using Rwanda since the 1994 genocide as a case study, these principles will be studied to highlight their shortcomings in the context of research in post-conflict societies, while highlighting the importance of ethical research methods.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 355  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PCON 111  or PCON 218  or SOAN 218 or ANTH 218  or PCON 225  or ALST 201  or CORE 189C  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 358 - Transnational Politics


    Examines the segment of world politics that includes interactions and transactions between actors who are not representatives of governments or intergovernmental institutions. Non-state actors as diverse as global social movements, multinational corporations, religious communities, and even terrorist networks are now recognized as playing crucial roles on the world’s political stage. This course focuses on a variety of these transnational actors, as we seek to stretch the limits of state-based approaches, and emphasize the rich variety of relationships and interactions that characterizes contemporary world politics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: POSC 358  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 368 - After Genocide: Memory and Representation


    An investigation of the impact of genocide on the self and the imagination’s representations in literature, film, and art. Primary texts include poetry, memoir, video testimony, film, and visual art. Scholarly methodology involves readings of literary criticism and theoretical work in the study of trauma, literary theory, and testimony. Among the questions the course asks are: How does trauma shape imagination and open up access to the site of disaster that is now carried in fragments which inform memory? How do representations of violence shape and inflect aesthetic orientations and literary and artistic forms? The course concerns itself with the aftermath of two 20th-century genocides–that of the Armenians in Turkey during World War I and of the Jews in Europe during World War II–both seminal events of the 20th century that, in various ways, became models for ensuing genocides.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 368 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 479 - Research Seminar: Peace and Conflict, Themes and Analysis


    This is a theme-based seminar that examines the literature of peace and conflict studies and other relevant theoretical and analytical work relating to violence and conflict resolution at all levels of society. The seminar also focuses on the range of responses to war and violence, by both the state and the peace movement. Significant independent and group research is required. This course is required of all peace and conflict studies majors and minors in the senior year, but is open to others who meet the prerequisites.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PCON 111  and (PCON 218  or SOAN 218 or ANTH 218 ) and PCON 225  plus a minimum of three courses completed from cluster 2, and two courses completed from cluster 3.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Peace & Conflict Studies Majors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PCON 499 - Honors Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies


    Students qualified to pursue honors or high honors take this seminar in the spring of the senior year to complete or extend the thesis they have already begun in PCON 479. Enrollment is limited to seniors with a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher and a major GPA of 3.50 or higher, who have had their honors/high honors research proposal approved by the Peace and Conflict Studies faculty. To qualify for honors students must have achieved an A- or higher in PCON 479, or receive permission from the program director. Students who are not pursuing honors may also take this seminar to conduct independent research, by permission of the program director.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PCON 479  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Peace & Conflict Studies Majors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Restrictions: Permission of the program director is required
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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Philosophy

Course classifications:

Major Figures (MF)
Metaphysics and Epistemology (M&E)
Value Theory (VT)

  
  • PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophical Problems


    Acquaints students with the nature of philosophical problems and the means by which one might try to solve them. Readings and discussions are organized around perennial questions regarding the nature of morality and justice, free will, the existence of God, the meaning of life, the nature of knowledge, and the relation between mind and body.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 111 - Ethics


    Explores central questions of morality. What makes a good life good? What makes some actions right and others wrong? Are there human rights that everyone has? What are our obligations to others? Are there good answers to these questions, or is it all relative? Among the philosophers explored are Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Bentham, Mill, and various significant contemporary thinkers.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 121 - Political Philosophy


    Explores central questions in political philosophy, with an emphasis on the great figures in the tradition (including Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, and Marx). Among those questions are, what justifies the state? Is democracy the only legitimate form of government? How much freedom should be secured for individuals? How should we understand the ideal of equality?

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 202 - Environmental Ethics


    An introduction to the field of environmental ethics. Some of the major figures and philosophies in the environmental movement are studied and critically analyzed with a particular emphasis on the ethical reasoning and its influences on environmental policies and practices. Topics include the historical development of the environmental movement, central debates between preservationist and conservationist ethics, intrinsic and instrumental evaluations of the natural environment and its inhabitants, animal rights and the ethical treatment of animals, shallow and deep ecological distinctions, and anthropocentric versus biocentric and ecocentric evaluations of nature.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENST 202  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 214 - Medical Ethics


    Addresses urgent moral questions that arise in the field of medicine. Some of these are long standing. Is health strictly a biological concept, or do cultural and social norms in part determine what is good health? Should doctors act solely for the goal of improving their patients’ health, or is their central obligation to respect patient autonomy? Other questions are more recent. When exactly is a person dead, such that withdrawing life-saving equipment is appropriate? Should parents and doctors take steps to see that their children are born with more desirable traits and characteristics? Students learn how philosophic argument can help illuminate these and related issues.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 216 - Existentialism


    Designed to introduce students to existentialist thought via an examination of its 19th-century origins and 20th-century manifestations. Among the authors to be discussed are Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, and Marcel. Among the topics to be considered are existence, freedom, subjectivity, and absurdity.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 225 - Logic I


    Logic is the science of correct reasoning. It provides rigorous methods for evaluating the validity of arguments. This introductory course covers the basic concepts and techniques of propositional logic and first-order predicate logic with identity, including truth tables, proofs, and elementary model theory.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: This course is suitable for students in all areas and is highly recommended for philosophy majors.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 226 - Philosophy of Religion


    Can the existence of God be proven? Can it be disproven? What is the relationship between faith and reason? Does evil provide strong evidence against the existence of God? How should we think about the relationship between creation and evolution – and about the relationship between science and religion generally? Does the Christian notion of the Trinity make any sense? What about the idea of Original Sin or the Atonement? Students seek reasoned answers to many of these questions by evaluating the work of philosophers who address them. Students encounter both classical and contemporary authors, though the class focuses more on perspicacious presentations of these issues rather than on their historical development.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 228 - Philosophy of Science


    An introduction to the philosophy of science and explores issues of general philosophical interest to the sciences, rather than those germane to any particular discipline. Focus is on the issues of scientific laws, induction, theory confirmation and choice, falsificationism, reductionism, realism, explanation, prediction, and problems relevant to the special sciences.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 301 - Ancient Philosophy (MF)


    Surveys some of the central figures and ideas of classical Greek and Roman philosophy, with particular emphasis on Plato, Aristotle and the main Hellenistic schools. Topics to be considered include the aim and method of Socratic inquiry; Plato’s epistemology, theory of forms and defense of justice; Aristotle’s logic, ontology and ethical theory; Stoic and Epicurean cosmology and ethics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 302 - Modern Philosophy (MF)


    The rise of modern science together with the Reformation’s challenge to the authority of the Catholic Church created an era of intense intellectual and cultural ferment in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The philosophy of this period is called ‘modern’ because it made a distinct break with older traditions and because the questions it asked remain the central issues for philosophers today. Studying modern philosophy will help students think creatively about what there is, what we are, and what we can know. Readings will be selected from classic works by Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Locke, Berkeley, and Kant.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 303 - Medieval Philosophy (MF)


    Medieval philosophy involved the absorption and transformation of Greek and Hellenistic thought by Jewish, Christian, and Muslim thinkers, often in relations of mutual influence. The period is crucial not only for its project of reconciling reason and faith but also for philosophical insights, arguments, and formulations that have remained influential in several of the main areas of philosophy. The course focuses on questions concerning freedom of the will, the nature of moral requirements and obligation, the role of rational considerations in morality, the virtues, and ideals of human excellence. Students read figures from the three faith traditions and explore their interactions and mutual influences, as well as their differences. Coverage of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim thinkers is roughly equal, and students look at the Platonic, Neoplatonic, and Aristotelian background to their thought as well as the new directions in which they took philosophy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 304 - Kant and German Idealism (MF)


    German Idealism continues to be one of the most influential movements in philosophy, leaving its mark on many different fields of thought and experience, including epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, politics, and religion. Designed as an overview of the thought of the major representatives of German Idealism: Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Students will examine the problems that motivated the emergence and development of this philosophical tradition, and the new forms of philosophical argument that each of these thinkers employed in order to address these problems. In doing so, students will see that there is a sense in which Kant can be considered the father of Existentialism. The topics discussed include the doctrine of transcendental idealism, the nature and possibility of knowledge, the ground of moral obligation, human freedom, and religious belief. No prior familiarity with these issues or thinkers will be assumed.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 306 - Recent Continental Philosophy


    A study of some of the major movements in recent continental philosophy. Among the movements to be considered are phenomenology, existentialism, philosophical hermeneutics, poststructuralism, and postmodernism. Among the thinkers to be considered are Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Sartre, Foucault, and Derrida. Movements and thinkers may vary from year to year.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 310 - Philosophy and the Social Sciences


    Considers philosophical questions about the nature of the social sciences as well as philosophical questions prompted by the results and methods of the social sciences. These questions include: Do the natural sciences offer an appropriate model for the social sciences, or is there something distinctive about human phenomena that requires a fundamentally different mode of inquiry and style of explanation? Are the reasons for which we act also the causes of our actions, or are reason-based and cause-based explanations of human behavior fundamentally distinct? Are economists correct in their assumptions about the rationality of economic agents? Is it possible, or desirable, to conduct social scientific research in a value-neutral fashion? If not, what are the consequences for the objectivity of the social sciences? Are our values and moral attitudes themselves merely the effects of natural selection, as evolutionary psychologists maintain? Readings are drawn not only from philosophy, but also from sociology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociobiology.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 312 - Contemporary Political Philosophy (VT)


    Offers a critical engagement with the rich work in political philosophy that has appeared since the landmark publication of John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice. After a close examination of Rawls’ egalitarian liberalism, students take up the range of alternative positions that dominate contemporary political theory: conservatism, libertarianism, communitarianism, feminism, Marxism, and multi-culturalism.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Recommended: At least one course in ethics or political theory is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 313 - International Ethics (VT)


    Nations increasingly come into contact with one another in a common international arena, and these encounters raise a host of important moral questions: Are there moral standards that apply across all human communities, and if so, how specific are they? Do all human beings have rights, and if they do, what are they? What duties do wealthy countries have to aid poor ones? Are there moral constraints on how war must be conducted, and if so, what are they? In this course students engage with the work of contemporary theorists exploring these and related questions.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: At least one course in ethics or political theory is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 320 - 20th-Century Analytic Philosophy (M&E)


    Employs the tools of analytic philosophy to address the large topic of the mind, the world, and the relation between them; students also explore the closely related topics of how our concepts get their content and how our language gets its meaning. By analyzing both our concepts and our experience, students will try to answer questions like: What is the relation between experience and the world beyond the mind? Do beliefs about the world amount to knowledge? Is the content of experience conceptual – and so fully expressible in language – or does experience have a richness that always surpasses the expressive power of language? Where do concepts come from? What fixes their content, and what fixes the meaning of the words that express them? If the content of language is based in part on experience, can one understand the language of someone whose experience is different? Course readings will include works by Russell, Carnap, Quine, Sellars, Davidson, and McDowell.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 322 - Philosophy of Physics


    Modem physics overturned many assumptions about the fundamental nature of reality that had been widely accepted since Greek antiquity. Students trace the transition from Aristotelian mechanics to modern theories of motion, and then survey the main philosophical problems raised by three of our most successful physical theories: Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, and quantum theory. Topics discussed include the problem of action at a distance, thermodynamics and the arrow of time, theories of probability, non-locality, and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics.

    Credits: 1.0
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or one course in physics
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 325 - Logic II


    Covers a selection of advanced topics in logic: computability, Turing machines, soundness and completeness theorems, undecidability of predicate logic, Skolem-Löweheim theorems, nonstandard models, and Gödel’s incompleteness theorems.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHIL 225  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHIL 326 - Philosophical Theology


    Philosophical theology is the systematic articulation of divine revelation. Its origin as a discipline trace to antiquity, as early Christians sought to compose a coherent alternative to “pagan” philosophies (Platonic, Stoic, etc.), using the tools of those very philosophies (e.g., conceptual analysis and the determination of logical consistency as a means to metaphysical system-building). Philosophical theology flourished in the Middle Ages, as Jews, Christians, and Muslims grappled with the rediscovered Aristotelian corpus; it is in the midst of a renaissance begun in the second half of the 20th century. After examining the epistemological framework in which philosophical theology takes place, the course discusses particular issues, which may include: revelation and scripture, the concept of prayer, the oneness of God, mitzvoth (commandments), halakhah (law), the Trinity, the Incarnation, sin and original sin, the Atonement, and the eternal destiny of the soul.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 329 - Philosophy of Law (VT)


    Examines some central ideas of jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. Readings concentrate on general theories of law, justice, legal rights, liability, and legal responsibility, and on the nature of judicial reasoning and legal principles. Some broader methodological questions pertaining to causation and the law and the relation of law and morality are discussed and related to the readings.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: PHIL 229


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  • PHIL 330 - Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (VT)


    Discussion of the classical writings of philosophers on art and central ideas of aesthetics: form and content, expression, taste, and standards of criticism are included in this course. Readings include Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, etc., as well as contemporary essays.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 333 - Topics in Environmental Philosophy


    Involves a critical examination of selected fundamental issues and theories in environmental philosophy. Precise issues and themes vary from year to year, but may include sustainability and moral obligations to future generations; the nature of the good life for humans; the status of environmental values; recent work in environmental ethics theories including deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism; the moral and metaphysical status of human modifications to the world, including environmental restoration and genetic engineering; and aesthetics of the natural world. An emphasis is placed on exploring the connections between philosophical theory and environmental policy and practice.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 335 - Contemporary Epistemology (M&E)


    Examines central questions about knowledge and justification, including whether and how knowledge is possible, whether we must always be able to access the foundations of our justified beliefs, and how a knower can be virtuous or vicious. In answering these questions, students explore various sources of knowledge and justification, including perception, testimony, memory, and introspection. Students may also explore challenges to the dominant epistemological paradigms of the last century from naturalistic, experimental, feminist, and Bayesian perspectives.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: One course in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 340 - Metaphysics (M&E)


    A systematic study of central issues involved in theorizing about reality at the most general level. Is the world a world of substances or a world of events? What is the nature of causation? Do concepts and statements refer to the world as it is in itself, or is such a notion idle or incoherent? How are such things as possibility and necessity and laws of nature to be understood? The topics are handled in a way that stresses the historical persistence of the debates over these issues but focuses on recent and contemporary discussions of the topics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two courses in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Mind (M&E)


    Examines the historical and contemporary debates about the nature of the mind. These questions are considered: What is the relation of the mind to the physical world? How do mental states manage to be about things? Are all minds conscious? How serious is the difference between first-person and third-person perspectives on mental activity? What beyond consciousness is required for self-hood? What grounds our concept of mental health? What kind of mind makes individuals responsible for their behavior?

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 342 - Philosophy of Language (M&E)


    Examines major topics and insights in the philosophy of language from its modern inception in the late 19th century to the present. Core questions include: How does linguistic meaning relate to how people use language to communicate? What is meaning’s relationship to concepts like reference, truth, verification and use? Is there a systematic theory that can generate the meaning of every sentence in a language? In answering the above questions, students master the logical and conceptual tools for analyzing particular parts of language, which may include names, definite descriptions, demonstratives, metaphors, slurs, and other interesting linguistic expressions. Among the thinkers discussed are Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Grice, Quine, Searle, Davidson, and Kripke.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: A prior course in logic is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 343 - Topics in Moral Theory (VT)


    Moral theory concerns what makes acts right or wrong, what makes people good or bad. In addressing these issues, the course also considers the following questions: Do moral standards apply universally, or are they relative to one’s culture, religion, or other moral framework? Can we reconcile the impartiality of morality with the partiality we feel toward certain people, such as parents, spouses, or children? Are there ethical principles that apply in all circumstances, or is morality fundamentally a case-by-case affair? This course centers primarily on contemporary approaches to these questions, with the aim of enabling students to address these questions critically and rigorously.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 360 - Feminist Philosophy


    Explores questions like: How have gendered assumptions influenced philosophical views about what knowledge is and how knowledge is best pursued? What roles, if any, should considerations of gender play in our theories of knowledge? How have gendered assumptions influenced political discourse?  What conceptual advances might be won if we take the woman to be the paradigm of personhood rather than the man? Students may address issues in feminist philosophy of science, specifically issues concerning the scientific study of sexual differences in behavior and brain structure; or issues in feminist political philosophy, including the role of justice in the family and the effects of power inequality on autonomous decision-making.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 371 - Scottish Philosophy and the Fact-Value Distinction (Study Group)


    The distinctions between fact and value, reason and emotion, and objectivity and subjectivity, have long and varied histories. Students examine the role those distinctions played in two thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment: David Hume and Adam Smith. The motivations for and benefits of these distinctions are explored, with special attention paid to Hume’s concerns about religious “enthusiasm.” Rigid versions of these distinctions have, however, been criticized for their serious costs in both epistemology and ethics. Students engage with recent major criticisms, and then consider whether Hume or Smith might have had a more nuanced understanding of the distinctions they worked with than their many followers did.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 380 - Issues in Epistemology and Metaphysics (M&E)


    This is an umbrella course designed to allow students to delve into specific topics in epistemology or metaphysics. The study will situate each problem in its appropriate historical context thus allowing student access to the approaches to a given issue offered in Ancient, Medieval, Modern, and recent works. The course will bring students inside some problems and methods that lie at the heart of philosophy by inquiring into issues such as the structure of knowledge, our basis for making claims about other minds, possible worlds, skepticism, and the justification of belief.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: A course in philosophy, preferably PHIL 335  or PHIL 340 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 381 - Issues in Epistemology and Metaphysics (M&E)


    This is an umbrella course designed to allow students to delve into specific topics in epistemology or metaphysics. The study will situate each problem in its appropriate historical context thus allowing student access to the approaches to a given issue offered in Ancient, Medieval, Modern, and recent works. The course will bring students inside some problems and methods that lie at the heart of philosophy by inquiring into issues such as the structure of knowledge, our basis for making claims about other minds, possible worlds, skepticism, and the justification of belief.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 411 - Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Language


    This seminar is a detailed study of the thought of Ludwig Wittgenstein, one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century. This course first examines his early work in relation to problems about the nature of logic and language raised by Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell, and then it uses Wittgenstein’s later work to explore the nature of meaning and the concept of mind. Throughout, this course attempts to articulate the character and purpose of philosophical inquiry.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Three courses in philosophy
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Philosophy & Religion, Philosophy Majors
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: A prior course in logic is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 417 - Advanced Topics in Philosophy


    The choice of a central philosophical problem to study varies from year to year. The seminar is primarily for majors in philosophy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Philosophy & Religion, Philosophy Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 418 - Advanced Topics in Philosophy


    The choice of a central philosophical problem to study varies from year to year. The seminar is primarily for majors in philosophy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Philosophy & Religion, Philosophy Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 419 - Contemporary Moral Theory


    Focuses on questions about the status of moral value (whether it is objective or subjective, and in what sense) and questions about the respective roles of reason and sensibility in moral judgment and moral motivation. The central concern is how best to understand and explain the metaphysics, epistemology, and semantics of moral value. Is there moral knowledge? Are values grounded in feeling or desire? Are there moral facts? Students explore the basic character of moral judgment and moral language, with special attention to developments during recent decades. The seminar is primarily for majors in philosophy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Three courses in philosophy, including a course in ethics
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Philosophy & Religion, Philosophy Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 490 - Honors


    Students pursuing honors in philosophy enroll in this course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHIL 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Philosophy Majors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Physics

  
  • PHYS 105 - Mechanical Physics I


    Covers fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics and their applications into science, engineering, and in particular, architecture. Selected topics including waves, fluids, optics, electricity and magnetism, and thermal physics are aimed toward applications in the geosciences. Not suitable for students majoring in programs or concentrations requiring two or more semesters of physics.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only, but not necessarily every year

    Corequisite: PHYS 105L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 105L - Mechanical Physics I Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 105 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only, but not necessarily every year

    Corequisite: PHYS 105 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 111 - Fundamental Physics I


    This introductory course emphasizes concepts and principles of mechanics, heat, waves, and sound. The focus is on building concepts, grasping principles, and learning how consequences of principles and concepts can be quantitatively calculated and measured. Students may not take this course after having completed PHYS 431.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 111L 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 111L - Fundamental Physics I Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 111 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 111 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 112 - Fundamental Physics II


    Develops concepts and principles of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 112L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 111   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 112L - Fundamental Physics II Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 112 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 112 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 131 - Atoms and Waves


    An introduction to modern physics via the concepts and discoveries of the 20th century. Topics include the structure and dynamics of atoms, special relativity, wave-particle duality of matter, and fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Studies contemporary physics using algebra, trigonometry, and a minimum of calculus. Two lectures, two problem-solving recitations, and one laboratory meeting per week.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 131L , PHYS 131RE
    Prerequisites: Students who plan to continue into PHYS 232  should co-register for MATH 161  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: This course is required for students planning to major in physics, physics-astronomy, or physical science, and for students interested in pre-engineering.
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 131L - Atoms and Waves Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 131 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 131 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 201 - Mathematical Methods for Physics


    This half-semester course is an introduction to computational physics, providing the mathematical foundation required for sophomore- through senior-level physics courses.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: PHYS 201L , PHYS 232  
    Prerequisites:
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 201L - Mathematical Methods for Physics Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 201 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: PHYS 201  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 205 - Mathematical Methods of Physics


    A one-semester introduction to the mathematical methods of physics, with an emphasis on applications and how these methods are used to approach various problems. The course will cover topics such as ordinary differential equations, complex numbers and Euler’s equation, linear systems, Fourier series, Fourier transforms, computational techniques, series expansions, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, vector differentiation, divergence and curl, integration methods and multi-dimensional integrals. These topics will be brought to bear on physical problems such as the damped and driven oscillator, coupled oscillators, electric dipoles, beat frequencies, electromagnetic waves and electrostatic boundary-value problems.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: MATH 163  and   and  , all with a grade of C- or better 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: PHYS 202, 203 & 204


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 232 - Introduction to Mechanics


    A study of classical mechanics using astronomical themes. The principles of kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, and gravitation are developed and used to understand the properties of astronomical objects such as planetary systems, binary stars, and galaxies. Treatment is more thorough than in PHYS 111. Differential and integral calculus and vector manipulation are used throughout. Two lectures, two recitation meetings, and one laboratory session per week.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 232L , PHYS 201  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 131  and MATH 161    both with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students may not take this course after having completed PHYS 431 .
    Recommended: Required for students planning to major in physics, astronomy-physics, or physical science, and for students interested in pre-engineering. It is also recommended for chemistry majors. Students who plan to take physics courses beyond PHYS 232 should co-register in MATH 163  and PHYS 201 .
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 232L - Introduction to Mechanics Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 232 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 232 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 233 - Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism


    The classical theory of electricity and magnetism is assembled from observations of nature and physical inference, using differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is on the fundamental roles played by the electric and magnetic fields, their geometrical properties, and their dynamics. Principles of elementary circuits are also included.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 233L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 232  and MATH 163   both with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students are not eligible to take this course after completing PHYS 431 .
    Recommended: This course is required for students planning to major in the physical sciences and pre-engineering. Students planning to take physics courses beyond PHYS 233 should co-register in PHYS 205 .
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 233L - Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 233 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 233 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 301 - Fluid Mechanics


    Examines fluid properties and movement. Using principles of conservation of momentum, dimensionless numbers, and energy conservation, students learn and analyze fluid motion, force, turbulence, and flow in conduits and pipes.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: PHYS 232 None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 304 - Physical Optics


    A study of physical optics from the basics to advanced topics, such as optical instrumentation, Fourier optics, laser physics, and holography. The course prepares students for knowledgeable use of optical instruments in fields such as astronomy and teaches modern laser techniques for use in basic and applied research. Four lecture meetings and one laboratory meeting each week.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: PHYS 304L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 233  and (PHYS 201  and PHYS 202 and PHYS 203 and PHYS 204) or (PHYS 201  and PHYS 205 ) all with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 304L - Physical Optics Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 304 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Spring semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: PHYS 304  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 310 - Advanced Topics and Experiments


    This is an optional junior-year research experience open to qualified students. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, each student works on an experimental or theoretical project that ideally produces original results. A final thesis and a formal oral presentation are essential components of the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Junior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
  • PHYS 334 - Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity


    Provides the mathematical and conceptual foundation to understand two important developments in modern physics: special relativity and quantum theory, concentrating on wave mechanics.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 233  and PHYS 205   both with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 336 - Electronics


    A comprehensive treatment of basic electronics. The course covers analog and digital electronics. The analog section includes DC and AC circuits, filters, diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers. The digital section includes combinational and sequential logic, integrated circuits, and interfacing.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 336L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 205  or PHYS 233   both with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 336L - Electronics Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 336 .

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 336  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 350 - Biophysics


    An introduction to biological physics including a survey of topics such as diffusion, Brownian motion, non-Newtonian fluids, self-assembly, cooperativity, bioenergetics, and nerve impulses, as well as experimental techniques and analytical approaches. Students first develop the interdisciplinary knowledge needed to address biophysical questions. The course then focuses on the reading, presentation, and critique of current biophysics research literature. Although challenging in its breadth, this course is intended to be accessible to juniors and seniors majoring in physics, chemistry, or biology.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: BIOL 350  
    When Offered: Spring semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: MATH 161   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a faculty member, and following a course-like format. The content and syllabus must be approved in advance by the department chair. 

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 392 - Independent Study - Research


    Opportunity for research-based individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. This course does not count towards the upper-level course requirement for the physics or Astronomy-physics majors or for honors.

    Credits: variable
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334  (waived for astrogeophysics majors)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: PHYS, ASTR, ASGE, NASC only
    Class Restriction: Only Junior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 410 - Advanced Topics and Experiments


    This is a required senior research experience. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, each student works on an experimental or theoretical project that ideally produces original results. A final thesis and a formal oral presentation are essential components of the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 410L - Advanced Topics and Experiments Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 410 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: PHYS 410  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 431 - Classical Mechanics


    A detailed study, using vector calculus, of important problems in the mechanics of particles and extended bodies including a derivation of Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, and other advanced topics.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 432 - Electromagnetism


    A study of Maxwell’s equations and their applications to topics in electrostatics and electrodynamics, including electromagnetic waves.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 433 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics


    An introduction to the physical concepts underlying the formalism of thermal physics. Emphasis is on the role and meaning of entropy in physical systems and processes. Topics include black body radiation, liquid helium, superconductivity, negative temperature, and the efficient use of energy.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 434 - Quantum Mechanics


    An introduction to the theory and formalism of quantum mechanics. This course addresses the philosophical and mathematical foundations of the theory. It develops the linear algebraic formulation using spins, photon and atoms; and cover topics that include time evolution, angular momentum, the harmonic oscillator, the Schrodinger equation, entanglement, and quantum information. A series of optional laboratories gives students vivid examples of quantum mechanical principles.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: PHYS 434L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 434L - Quantum Mechanics


    Required corequisite to PHYS 434 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: PHYS 434 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 448 - Nonlinear Dynamics & Chaos


    An introduction to the techniques and concepts used to analyze real-time dynamic models that involve nonlinear terms. Applications are emphasized and demonstrate the universality of chaotic solution behavior. This course is team-taught by members of the physics and mathematics departments.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: MATH 448  
    When Offered: Spring semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: MATH 308  or (  with a grade of C- or better) (One with a grade of C- or higher.)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Students should enroll through the department for which they intend to use the credit
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: PHYS 458


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  • PHYS 451 - Computational Mechanics


    Investigates general algorithms and their implementation for the exploration of problems in classical and quantum mechanics. Applications range widely from solar system dynamics and chaotic systems to particles in general quantum potentials. Fourier analysis, including the fast Fourier transform, and its application to the understanding of physical systems and data analysis, are also studied. Each student undertakes a major numerical project of his or her choice.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: PHYS 451L  
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a grade of C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 451L - Computational Mechanics Lab


    Required corequisite to PHYS 451 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: PHYS 451 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • PHYS 453 - Solid State Physics


    Several important properties of matter in its solid form are examined. The ordered, crystalline nature of most solids is used as a starting point for understanding condensed material and as a basis for introducing the band theory of solids. The course investigates thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties of metals, semiconductors, and insulators.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only, in alternate years

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334  and (PHYS 201  and PHYS 202 and PHYS 203 and PHYS 204) or (PHYS 201  and PHYS 205 ) all with a C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 456 - Relativity and Cosmology


    At the beginning of the 20th century, Einstein’s discovery of the Special and General Theories of Relativity revolutionized understanding of space and time. This course studies both theories; the emphasis is on General Relativity, including cosmology and the study of black holes.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334   with a C- or higher.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a faculty member, and following a course-like format. The content and syllabus must be approved in advance by the department chair. 

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  • PHYS 492 - Independent Study - Research


    Opportunity for research-based individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. This course does not count towards the upper-level course requirement for the physics or Astronomy-physics majors or for honors.

    Credits: variable
    Prerequisites: PHYS 334  (waived for astrogeophysics majors) 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: PHYS, ASTR, ASGE, NASC only
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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Political Science

Course classifications:

American politics (AM)
Comparative politics (CO)
International relations (IR)
Political theory (TH)

  
  • POSC 150 - America as a Democracy (AM)


    While most Americans take it for granted that our political system is a democracy and that it serves as an ideal by which other systems might be measured, the United States is only one of many stable democratic polities in existence today. In our analysis of American democracy, this course places an emphasis on how the U.S. government fits within the multicultural and global world of the 21st century. To this end, students compare America’s democracy with other forms of democratic government across the globe.  Students also consider how the growing racial-ethnic, class, sexuality, and gender diversity of the American population may impact the future of American politics. In our analysis of American democracy, this course places an emphasis on how the U.S. government fits within the multicultural and global world of the 21st century. To this end, we will compare America’s democracy with other forms of democratic government across the globe.  We will also consider how the growing racial-ethnic, class, sexuality, and gender diversity of the American population may impact the future of American politics. (AM)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • POSC 151 - Politics and Moral Vision (TH)


    This introduction to political theory addresses the ways in which personal morality and ideas of human flourishing determine one’s perceptions and responses to political institutions that shape the life and culture of one’s nation. Using a wide variety of texts, the moral underpinnings of different political systems are discussed in terms of fundamental normative concepts such as right, duty, virtue, liberty, and equality. Other essential terms, basic to building a foundational political vocabulary, such as liberalism, conservatism, individualism, communalism, and modernity are also explored. This introduction to normative political theory gives special emphasis to the genesis and development of liberal democracy and the tensions between its component parts, particularly as they relate to visions of a well-lived, moral life. This course is designed to enrich one’s perceptions of the evening news and the political discourse of our times. (TH)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  • POSC 152 - Global Peace and War (IR)


    Designed to provide students with an understanding of how international politics - politics between governments - differs from politics within a state. Students consider how the international system has evolved and currently operates, and examines some of the enduring questions of international relations: Why is there war? How can war be avoided? Is international equality a prerequisite for order? Can order, justice, and cooperation be achieved in a non-institutionalized and non-hierarchical system? (IR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

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