2018-2019 University Catalogue 
    
    Apr 01, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
  •  

    FREN 455 - Francophone Voices from North Africa


    This seminar examines the literature written in French by Maghrebi and Beur women authors since the early 1980s. The product of a colonial and post-colonial history, this is a literature where cultures, histories, identities, genres, and languages intersect. It gives voice to new questions of identity and self-definition through the exploration of traditional as well as innovative forms of writing. In order to establish the historical and cultural contexts in which this body of literature has emerged and is growing, the course includes an overview of the history of Franco-Maghrebi relations and Maghrebi immigration to France. Through the reading of texts by Maghrebi and Beur authors, this course explores and discusses issues such as imperialism and colonialism, post-colonialism, cultural translocation, identity politics, gender and race, religion, multilingualism, sexuality, urban development and design, etc.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 469 - Topics in French Literature (Study Group)


    Taught at the University of Burgundy as part of the Dijon Study Group.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 481 - Major French Authors


    This seminar, offered on an irregular basis, provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the French language before 1800. It is taught by faculty members who have particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined. FREN 481 is a category 1 course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 482 - Major French Authors


    This seminar provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the French language after 1800. It is taught by faculty members who have particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined. Counts toward Category II for the major.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: On an irregular basis

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 485 - Words into Paintings: Paintings into Words


    The course focuses on the way in which painters often paint subjects taken from literature and on the way writers, particularly poets, are fascinated by images from the visual arts. Students will explore the interrelated topics of “poets on painting and paintings on poetry” and on the transposition of paintings into words and words into paintings. The course concentrates on such painters as Poussin, Chardin, Delacroix, Manet, Gauguin and Van Gogh and on a number of writers whose work focuses very specifically on painters and paintings - Diderot, Baudelaire, Yves Bonnefoy, among others.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 490 - Honors


    Students pursuing honors in French enroll in this course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    FREN 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 105 - Climate and Society


    Human-induced climate change–global warming–is the defining environmental and social issue of our times. That people are dramatically altering the climate is now the resounding consensus in the scientific community. Potential short- and long-term impacts include biodiversity loss, sea-level rise and coastal flooding, more intense storms, threats to human health, and disruptions of freshwater supplies and food security. But while the global community increasingly understands the basic processes driving climate change, and is starting to appreciate the consequences of a warmer world, the coupled social and biophysical dynamics of global warming are complex and the issue remains controversial. This course explores climate-society relationships in industrial and pre-industrial periods, and considers the multifaceted natural and human dimensions of global warming. It also highlights the integrative natural and social science modes of analysis commonly used in the discipline of geography.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOG 205


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 107 - Is the Planet Doomed?


    “End of the world” scenarios have been linked to global pandemics, super-volcanoes, artificial intelligence, and melting permafrost. “Is the Planet Doomed” uses these and other examples to study contemporary catastrophism. The course explores arguments that suggest the world may have reached “peak humanity.” Potential mass extinction events arise from the convergence of biological, climatic, economic, technological factors on one hand, and war on the other. The course analyzes these factors using the integrative modes of analysis commonly used in the discipline of geography. And it exposes how geography affects the catastrophic imaginary.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOG 207


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 121 - Earth, Society, and Sustainability


    The spatial scale, magnitude, and pace of human-induced environmental changes over the past 300 years are unprecedented. It is essential to undertake reasoned assessments of the complex and interrelated political, socioeconomic, technological, cultural, and biophysical factors leading to environmental changes if society is to manage them appropriately. This course is an introduction to the major environmental problems of resource depletion, pollution, and ecosystem transformation. It explores the effects of environmental changes on society, as well as societal responses to them, and enhances understanding of the causes of these changes from multiple theoretical perspectives.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 211 - Geographies of Nature, Economy, Society


    Acquaints students with the approaches and subject matter of human and nature-society geography. It introduces geography’s longstanding concerns with spatial location, place, and nature-society interaction, as studied through ways of knowing that are central to the discipline—spatial representation and analysis, cross-scalar comparisons, integrative synthesis, and the social construction of space and environment. Case studies illustrate how geographers use these tools and perspectives to clarify such issues as human well-being and inequality, economic and sociocultural globalization, population patterns and processes, human impact on the environment, and sustainable development in the Anthropocene.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOG 111


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 231 - Geography of the Physical Environment


    Provide students with a general understanding of the processes and spatial distribution of the Earth’s primary physical systems and the ways in which humans interact with these systems. Course emphasis is divided into three areas: atmospheric processes, the spatial dynamics of vegetation and soils, and landform development. Students are introduced to the basic physical processes and interactions that operate within each of these categories, with special focus on the ways in which these factors relate to contemporary environmental problems.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOG 131


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 245 - Geographic Information Systems


    Focuses on the theory, function, and application of geographic information systems (GIS). The analytical powers of GIS are rooted in its ability to manage large volumes of geographically referenced data representing both physical and social characteristics. As such, GIS has become an important analytical approach in most subfields of geography. Students begin with an examination of basic mapping concepts, geographic data issues, symbolism, and generalization. Emphasis then shifts to issues in GIS data structure, collection, and input. Once a solid understanding of these GIS foundation issues is achieved, attention turns to the analytical powers and applications of GIS. These topics are reinforced by a series of exercises dealing with local geographic data. Students make use of the ArcGIS geographic information system and involves map digitization, geographic data collection (using global positioning systems, satellite imagery, and aerial photography), database management, and spatial analysis.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOG 245L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 245L - Geographic Information Systems Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOG 245 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOG 245 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 248 - Quantitative Analysis of Geographic Data


    Introduces students to the nature of quantitative research in geography and the spatial sciences through the statistical analysis of social, environmental, and spatial data. This research methods course is thus unique within the department in illustrating the analytic commonalities between human and environmental geography. Students develop a critical perspective on issues of measurement of empirical data collected or available to geographers. Students consider the implications for validity and reliability in measurement of social and environmental geographic concepts using quantitative methods of measurement and data collection. Strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to data collection and sampling of social, environmental, and spatial data are demonstrated. Students actively engage in the statistical analysis of geographic data to both describe frequency distributions of social, physical, and spatial characteristics, and to explain patterns of variation in outcome variable using statistical modeling. Students are challenged to undertake hypothesis testing and multivariate statistical analysis as well as to effective communicate the results of statistical analyses to readers of all subdisciplines of geography.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who have completed MATH 102/CORE 143S  or BIOL 220 need instructor permission
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 250 - Research Methods


    Acquaints students with key principles and practices of original scholarly research. First emphasizes the key role in research of a clearly formulated question, one that is significant and workable and is grounded in a conceptual framework drawn from the existing literature. Then focuses on the techniques and rationale of a particular method of research, which will vary from semester to semester. Examples of possible foci include statistical analysis, interviews, community-based and participatory research, content analysis, or the interpretation of historical primary sources. In close consultation with the instructor, students design, carry out, and report on a research project employing that method to answer a question of their own design.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 251 - Media Frames and Content Analysis


    Mass media is a key set of institutions in modernity that shape our perceptions of the world, with important impacts on what we take to be reality. The media “frames” that structure how media is produced, conveyed, and consumed form the discourses that we use to understand mass politics and culture in our daily lives. This course provides students with the methodological tools to empirically study media frames through content analysis. Content analysis takes the stuff of media, such as music lyrics, news stories, or advertisements, and systematically analyzes the content for the explicit and implicit frames that represent the issues and perspectives conveyed through media. The course provides students hands-on training in content analysis through a series of workshops on content sampling, collection, coding, and analysis that culminate in a final research project. This course meets for the first 7 weeks of the term and may be used to satisfy the 0.50-credit methods requirement for the sociology major.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted: SOCI 251 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Geography, Sociology, Environmental Geography Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 253 - Interviews


    Introduces students to the nature of qualitative social science research using interviews. Interviews are a flexible method of in-person data collection that include a range of structures (from structured surveys to open-ended questions), with varying group sizes (from one to a large focus group), and using multiple methods of eliciting responses (verbal questions, oral history, photo-elicitation, etc.). Students develop a critical perspective on different epistemological approaches to research and analysis within the contemporary social sciences, including issues of generalizability and the validity and reliability of qualitative methods. A series of hands-on original research projects provides students with the skills of interview protocol design, sampling for interview projects, interview facilitation, data management and analysis, and professional communication of research results.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted: SOCI 253 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Geography, Sociology, Environmental Geography Majors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 304 - Criminal Underworld: Drugs, Guns, Bodies


    Examines the violent networks of the illicit global economy: from guns and drugs smuggling, to human trafficking and animal poaching among others. Drawing from multiple scholarly traditions, it compares the concrete geographical organization of these illicit networks - that is, where and how they become grounded - and asks the following questions: What are the relationships of these illegal activities to legal circuits of power and profit? In what ways are transnational criminal networks redefining the nature of contemporary violence and the meaning of peace?

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: PCON 304 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 305 - Geopolitics of the Middle East


    Focuses on episodes in modern history when events in the Middle East have had geopolitical consequences. Students examine how things happening “over there” have repercussions (or generate concerns about repercussions) in the international system of states as a whole. In order to pay close attention to the systemic effects of events in the Middle East, case studies privilege the moments in between major wars that shook the region. Of necessity, the course focuses extensively on the period known as “The Cold War.” Analyses are organized around the careers of three fluids: oil, water, and blood. The first two are quite “dear” in the Middle East and have organized entire political economies. The evidence would suggest that the third has not been considered as precious, particularly by the great powers and would-be hegemons of the modern era.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: MIST 305  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 306 - The Geography of Happiness


    Achieving some degree of happiness is a primary goal for most people. Certainly, a huge industry has emerged in recent years to feed the public’s desire for ways to improve their happiness. There is also a rapidly growing amount of research on the subject. This course starts with an overview of the diverse, multidisciplinary scholarship on factors that may contribute to happiness. But the main goal of the course is to consider themes central to the discipline of geography: how do environmental changes, efforts to achieve sustainable development, and culture affect the geography of happiness? Do people achieve a greater sense of well-being when interacting with wilderness or by exploring nature in their backyards? Does environmental stewardship improve happiness? What roles do attitudes about food and leisure play in how happy people are? Students explore these questions via out-of-class excursions, films, diverse mix of scholarly and popular press readings, guest speakers, and individual research projects.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 308 - Authoritarian Capital Cities of Eurasia (Extended Study)


    Certain spatial and temporal patterns of urban growth characterize post-socialist Eurasia, due to the distinct mark that authoritarianism has left on past and present capital cities throughout this region. This course focuses on understanding authoritarianism in the past and present capital cities of Russia (St. Petersburg and Moscow) and Kazakhstan (Almaty and Astana). While remnants of the Tsarist and Soviet built environments still strongly shape urban character, new urban development and demographic change, alongside other economic and geopolitical transformations, have transformed them since 1991. Rapid and changing patterns and styles of urbanization create a multitude of perspectives and experiences within post-socialist cities as our globalizing world blurs the boundaries between urban spaces, individual lives, and abstract conceptualizations of the East, West, or even “post-” socialist places. This course uses a phenomenological methodology to examine post-socialist cities as sites of socio-cultural and political-economic transformations. Using this framework, students analyze their experiences in photographs, videos, and journals/blogs related to the encounters with spaces and places in post-socialist cities.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: REST 308 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 309 - Latin America: Critical Landscapes of Development


    Explores the development experience of Latin America through examination of pressing environmental, economic, political, and social issues that currently face the region as a whole and play out differently across the region. The focus is guided by a critical reading of development theory, paying particular attention to Latin American theorizations and empirical experiences, and concern for the subjects, places, and scales that have been excluded from the presumed benefits of development. Mindful that Latin America’s development experience is historically embedded, students examine the transformation of Latin American societies and environments through legacies of conquest and colonialism, processes of globalization and neo-liberalization, dynamics of rural and urban change, changes in gender and race relations, and transformations of political and civil society dynamics. These issues are grounded in case studies drawn from Central America, the Caribbean, and Andean countries, and Southern Cone, and Brazil. The course’s point of entry is contemporary environmental crises and the role of natural and human resources in shaping the development experience of the region.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 309 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 310 - Geopolitics


    Broadly defined, Geopolitics is the study of “the relationship among politics and geography, demography, and economics, especially with respect to the foreign policy of a nation.” As the study of political geography on a global scale, geopolitics examines the relationship between territories, boundaries, and states in the “closed system” we call planet earth. But geopolitics is more than an academic field. Geopolitical thought has actually instructed states how to relate to one another in the contest for territory, security, and resources. For example, the history of geopolitical analysis is closely connected to – and has often justified – various imperial projects. As a result, this course examines the relation between the development of geopolitical thought on one hand, and geopolitical events on the other. Of particular importance to the relation between theories of geopolitics and the actual geostrategies of states has been the development of conflict on a planetary scale. And so, this course traces that relation through the study of geopolitical thought and practice in the course of imperial struggles in the 19th century, World Wars and the threat of nuclear wars in the 20th century, and new global challenges such as resource wars and environmental security in our own time.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: PCON 310 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 311 - Global Urban


    An exploration of contemporary urban geography and academic writing about the city. It introduces students to the ways in which urban geography has played a role, along with other disciplines that focus on the urban, in understanding cities and the issues that surround them. This includes an examination of how cities are conceived, lived, and represented. The course investigates the following topics: What are the various ways that people create, and attempt to materialize, their geographical imaginations of what they want the city to be? What are the ways in which different social groups make claims on space and place, and how does the scale at which these activities occur have effects? What are the critical questions to ask about urban landscapes today? How would you formulate a research proposal on such topics? The course offers a theoretical and practical framework within which to examine the city as a site of socio-cultural and political-economic transformation. In this framework, students analyze how the state, market, and civil society intersect, and how this has changed over the 20th century in the U.S. and other parts of the world.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 312 - The American City


    Focuses on the historical development and contemporary spatial patterns and processes of American cities. Topics emphasized include the decentralization of people and jobs within urban areas, metropolitan political fragmentation, racial residential segregation, inner-city gentrification, urban public service provision issues, the role of new immigrant groups, and feminist perspectives on urban geography, plus international and interregional comparisons to elicit distinctive characteristics of urbanization in the US.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 313 - Geographical Political Economy: Asia in Globalization


    Contemporary sociocultural and environmental issues cannot be understood without a good grasp of globalizing, yet place-specific political economic contexts in which these issues are embedded. The course aims to prepare students with conceptual and analytical foundations of economic geography with a particular attention to the roles of states, firms, and workers in the increasingly interconnected world. A strong empirical emphasis is given to Asia, although other world regions are addressed throughout the course for comparative and integrative purposes. Questions asked in this course include: what causes territorial economic growth and decline? How do place-specific economic structures influence policies? How are “the economy” and environment interrelated? Does advanced technology make geography irrelevant? Does economic growth produce socio-spatial inequality? In answering these questions, Asia offers a critical empirical arena to test theories and hypotheses, many of which have been developed primarily in the Euro-American contexts.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 314 - Population Issues and Analysis


    Analyzes the role of population dynamics in ecological, social, and economic organization and change. Methods of incorporating demographic analysis into scientific and policy research are introduced. Approaches to assessing the implications of population growth are studied. The course considers the relationship of population to a range of policy concerns including environmental change, social welfare, and security; the status of women; poverty and economic development; and race and ethnic relations.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: SOCI 314 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 315 - Sustainable Livelihoods in Asia


    We are living in the world of growing uncertainty filled with various “shocks” such as natural disasters, financial crises, and development projects, and more insidious “distress” via resource depletion, excessive industrial specialization, and demographic transitions. This course focuses on how households and communities cope with, resist, adapt to, and challenge these large structural “disturbances” in locally specific and ingenious ways in order to take control and enhance their livelihood opportunities and cultural identities. Case studies are drawn from various parts of Asia, with a particular focus on Japan. Although theoretical foundations of this course are grounded in the literature on sustainable livelihood and community resilience in geography and neighboring fields, it is designed for students with various disciplinary backgrounds and interest in Asia. Students are expected to apply their disciplinary skills and regional knowledge to the course project.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 316 - Environmental and Public Health Geographies


    Considers patterns of spatial and social distribution of disease and of health and medical resources. Alternative analytical approaches to describing and explaining these patterns of distribution are demonstrated. Selected topics include disease systems and disease ecology, the population analysis of mortality and morbidity, environmental influences on health, and the distribution and accessibility of health resources. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical societies throughout the world.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 318 - International Migration, U.S. Immigration, and Immigrants


    Introduces students to approaches to the study of international migration, immigrant assimilation and adjustment, ethnic social and economic stratification, and immigration policy formation and analysis. These topics are explored within the historical and contemporary context of the United States and New York. The class considers theoretical perspectives that have been applied to the study of migration as well as approaches used by sociologists and geographers in empirical analyses of US immigration, immigrant populations, and ethnic relations. These analytical issues are considered in detail for immigrant and ethnic groups within New York State and the New York metropolitan community. Finally, students consider the relationships among patterns of immigration and ethnic relations, cultural change, international relations and transnational linkages, and US immigration policy reform.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: SOCI 318  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites:   or (SOCI 101  or SOAN 101) or (ANTH 102  or SOAN 102)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 319 - Population and Environment


    Engages students in the analysis of the relationship between historical and contemporary human population dynamics and environmental processes and change. Theoretical perspectives on the relationships between and among population processes and the environment are considered on the basis of empirical evidence and also within the context of political debate and popular discourse. Students engage this topic through analytics skills in demography to measure and model population characteristics such as growth, distribution, fertility, mortality, and migration; and in selected environmental processes including climate and weather, land and landscapes, water resources, and biological resources and biodiversity. Having gained perspectives and skills to address population and environment interactions, students examine a global, national, or regional case study of observed and expected relationships between population processes and environmental resources, processes, and systems.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 320 - Globalization, Development, and Environment


    Approaches international development via geography’s integrative perspective. Analyzes the concepts of development, sustainability, and underdevelopment as well as the evolution of development theory, policy, and praxis. Particular attention focuses on contemporary issues of sustainable development such as population pressure, environmental degradation, agricultural development and food security, population displacement, rapid urbanization, the informal sector, transnational corporations, and grassroots social movements. Places the study of development within a global framework, considering further the impact of colonialism, economic restructuring, the role of international organizations, and the implications of international economic and environmental policy for developing countries. Students have the opportunity to apply the concepts studied to specific developing countries or international issues of their choice.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 321 - Gender, Justice, and Environmental Change


    Explores how the environment (both physical and social) shapes, and is shaped by, the roles of men and women in society. Addresses environmental issues from the dual perspective of gender relations and social justice to advance students’ understandings of the fundamental relationship between human activities and our physical and social environments. To this end, students work across diverse geographies to explore (1) the social relations underlying environmental problems; (2) the ways in which gender, class, race, and ethnicity intersect in environmental issues; and (3) the social and environmental processes that underlie the construction of gender and the life-worlds of the individuals in those “geographies.” Students bring a global perspective to the issues by drawing out local-global linkages. Case studies are drawn from North America, Latin America, Africa, and Asia.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 322 - Ecologies of the City


    With half of the world’s population living in and around cities, the needs of urban-based populations and economies dominate non-urban peoples, places, and habitats worldwide. This course begins with an introduction to political ecology, a body of knowledge combining political economy and cultural ecology. Political economy is the study of how different societies are connected globally, and cultural ecology is the study of the relationship between a society and its natural environment. Although political ecology largely focuses on places and cultures of “pristine” or “native” nature in “other” countries, this course turns to urban settings to explore how people understand urban areas and what their relationship to the environment in these areas is. Case studies of specific places (from small cities in upstate New York to global cities in distant countries) are used to learn about urban political ecological issues through readings, assignments, discussion, and interaction with local/regional experts on urban environmental problems. Students apply their knowledge about urban political ecology both collaboratively, in a final project conducted in a workshop-type setting, and individually, in a final term paper.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 323 - Arctic Transformations


    The Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing regions of the world today, environmentally, culturally, and politically. Rapid biophysical change occurs here today due to climate change, but equally noteworthy are cultural, social, and political transformations experienced by people living and working in the Arctic. People are under increasing pressure to change along with transformation of their biophysical environments, particularly as new actors express interest in the Arctic as space opening up to global transportation, mineral exploration, and trade and ecotourism. Within geography, interest in Arctic phenomena includes grappling with complex issues related to social and biophysical changes in this region, which often originate beyond the region but have specific meaning for the region. Students investigate three vibrant areas of Arctic transformation: cultural transformation occurring among indigenous and local peoples, biological and physical transformation of the environment, and political transformation within and related to the region.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: REST 323  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 324 - International Environmental Policy


    As awareness of global environmental problems grows, questions arise as to how social, cultural, and biophysical contexts define how humans use and manage natural resources, on both community and national scales of analysis. This course uses geographic perspectives on nature-society interactions to consider the decision-making processes of natural resource managers, from local farmers to policy actors at the national and international levels. Case studies in Africa and Latin America are used to explore the environmental (biophysical) and political constraints on the management of natural resources.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 325 - Water and Society


    No natural substance is more vital to human existence or used in more different ways than fresh water. This course considers the natural and social processes (with primary focus on the latter) that shape water use both within and outside of the United States, including physical factors, technology, economics, culture, law, and political systems and ideologies. The focus is on the services that water provides, the causes and consequences of water scarcity, and the ways in which water’s services might be obtained in more sustainable ways.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 326 - Environmental Hazards


    Environmental hazards are threats to people and the things they value. Hazards are a complex mix of natural processes and human actions; thus, they do not just happen, but are caused. This course emphasizes the role of institutions, technology, and human behavior in hazard creation, as well as ways in which society responds to hazards of multiple origins: case studies center on earthquakes, hurricanes, and wildfire (natural hazards); toxic pollution (technological hazards); and malaria and invasive species (biological hazards). A key theme explores ways in which society may mitigate the risk of environmental hazards and manage them more effectively.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 327 - Australia’s Stolen Generations: The Legacies of Carrolup (Extended Study)


    The intellectual goal of this extended study is to address issues of both population vulnerabilities and cultural resilience by considering Aborigines in Australia, and specifically engaging the historical geography and the contemporary experience of the Noongar community in Western Australia. Three themes form the curricular program of the extended study. (1) Students study the historical geography of Aborigines in Australia within the context of European colonization and settlement, federation and nation-building. These issues are framed using concepts of population vulnerability, environmental impact, and cultural heritage and identity at the national, regional and local geographic scales. (2) Students study the impacts of national, regional and local policies directed toward indigenous peoples on Aboriginal families and children, given particular focus to programs concerning part-Aboriginal children, Australia’s “Stolen Generations.” (3) Students learn the ways in which Aboriginal culture and ‘care for country’ has remained resilient across time, space, and generations.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted: PCON 327  
    Corequisite: GEOG 319  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 328 - Sustainability and Natural Resources


    Uses social science perspectives on sustainability and sustainable development to analyze the production and consumption of major natural resources. Addresses the following questions: What are natural resources, and how do their geographies combine with those of wealth and poverty, of political power and technological and institutional capacity, to affect the potential for actions towards sustainable development? How is our understanding of sustainable resource development enriched by critical perspectives from the social sciences about the meaning of such contested concepts as sustainability and development, and about issues of equity, power, participation, property rights, and unequal impacts (of both resource depletion and environmental policies)? How can the three dimensions (environmental, social, and economic) of sustainability better guide the production and consumption of natural resources, renewable or nonrenewable, in different places and by different actors? The topical and regional focus of the course varies from year to year; it may, for example, focus on oil (or energy more generally), on minerals, or on biological and genetic resources; and on specific geographic areas, such as central New York, Latin America, or the Arctic.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 329 - Environmental Security


    About how the environment poses one of the most important security threats of the 21st century. From an interdisciplinary perspective, students are introduced to the different ways that climate change and environmental problems more generally are presenting new kinds of security threats. In many ways, greater environmental concern from governments and international organizations over the dramatic environmental changes afoot in the world is a welcome development. But will the “environmental security” framework reinforce global inequalities and maintain the status quo? Or might it mean rethinking the very foundations of what we mean by “security”?

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: PCON 329  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 332 - Weather and Climate


    Focuses on the principles of meteorology and climatology with particular emphasis on Earth/energy dynamics, atmospheric circulation, and middle latitude climatology. Elements of Earth’s energy system are used first to establish the basic causal forces that drive all weather phenomena. These concepts are extended into a section on atmospheric forces and thermodynamics, and used to build an understanding of the middle latitude climate system, including middle tropospheric circulation vorticity concepts and surface cyclone and anticyclone development. During this process, students perform several exercises that focus on atmospheric data analysis and forecasting. These exercises make use of numerous online meteorological data resources and culminate in a case study project involving the detailed analysis of a significant weather event.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 335 - Soil Geography


    Focuses on the factors that influence soil distributions at scales ranging from a hillside to an entire continent. Begins with an introduction to soil morphology and genesis as a means to begin to understand the spatial variability of different soil properties. These concepts are extended into a section on soil geomorphology and the role soils play in global change research. Additional topics to be emphasized include soil survey and predictive soil mapping. Throughout the course students perform exercises and/or participate in field excursions that focus on learning how to differentiate soils on the landscape.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOG 231  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 336 - Biogeography


    Focuses on the factors that influence plant and animal distributions at scales ranging from population to biome. To set the stage for discussing the geography of life, students first examine the earth’s physical setting. This leads to consideration of the fundamental processes determining plant and animal distributions. The interactions among these processes are also examined, thereby introducing the concept of the ecosystem. The functions of an ecosystem are discussed with focuses on energy and matter flow, population dynamics, succession, and disturbance. The culmination of these processes is reflected in broad-scale geographic patterns. Thus, the characteristics of the major biomes are examined. Finally, because humans and the environment are inextricably linked, students explore several impacts humans have on the landscape, including fragmentation, extinction, and species introductions.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 338 - Earth System Ecology


    Examines how plants influence exchanges of energy, carbon, and water between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Begins with an examination of key biological and physical processes that regulate ecosystem carbon and water cycles, paying particular attention to critical linkages between the two. This leads to a consideration of how these processes function at larger spatial scales, and how they vary with time in response to climatic drivers. The land surface energy balance is discussed here as well, because it is inextricably linked with ecosystem carbon and water cycling. Finally, the interplay between ecosystems and climate is examined.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 340 - Geographic Information Systems and Society


    Explores the impact of geographic information systems (GIS) on society. Begins by considering how technological advances in GIS have transformed the nature of geographic data creation and opened up entirely new fields of spatial analysis. Various theoretical perspectives are employed to better understand issues of privacy and ethics as they relate to GIS technologies. Specific topics include locational privacy, participatory GIS, volunteered geographic information, location-based services, the geoweb and new media, digital social/spatial inequalities, and the role of GIS in security and surveillance.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 341 - Cartography


    As an academic discipline, geography focuses on the nature and causes of spatial variation. This focus is wide ranging and includes human and geophysical processes. Although the scope of geography is broad and the interest and expertise among geographers varied, one commonality is the use of maps and/or graphics for spatial analysis and visual communication. This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of cartography, including mapping theory, technique, and application. This objective is accomplished through a blend of lecture and exercises that introduce students to the theory and philosophy of cartography, map and graphic design, and appropriate forms of visual communication. The course begins with an introduction to cartography, including its history, and proceeds through examinations of statistical graphing, map projections, map design, symbology, and thematic mapping.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 346 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems


    Focuses on geographic information systems (GIS) theory and complex spatial analysis. It is divided into two segments: GIS concepts and theory, and advanced GIS analysis and application. The first segment explores the evolution of GIS from a set of cartographic and data analytical tools used primarily by geographers to a more encompassing set of ideas and tools used by many disciplines to examine spatial processes. Included in the first segment is a thorough examination of issues associated with mapping and referencing the non-spherical earth, conceptual models for representing spatial phenomena, and data-quality issues. The second segment focuses on a select set of spatial analytical issues that can be addressed using GIS. These issues include analysis of continuous spatial phenomena (e.g., terrain), model building using multiple sources of spatial data, network analysis, and the integration of remotely sensed data in a GIS.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOG 245  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 347 - Satellite Image Analysis


    Image analysis is a method used in geography to analyze remotely sensed data, including both satellite images and data collected from aircraft, in order to obtain information about earth’s surface phenomena from afar. The primary objective is to better understand, measure, and monitor features and human activities on Earth. Most typically, image analysis involves generating landcover maps using multi-spectral data collected by satellites. This course begins by focusing on the physical principles upon which image analysis is based, including the principles of acquiring and interpreting electromagnetic data collected by non-photographic sensors. Students then explore the basic tools of digital image processing (e.g., image enhancement, contract manipulation, etc.). This leads to a consideration of the process of image classification. Lastly, students discuss accuracy assessment as it applies to landcover classification, and spend a significant amount of time in the geography department computer lab performing analysis on remote sensing data.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOG 245 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 401 - Seminar in Geography


    The senior seminar focuses on emerging research within a subfield of contemporary geography chosen by the instructor. Students identify and pursue advanced work on topics within that subfield.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Geography, Environmental Geography Majors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 490 - Honors Preparation in Geography


    Students enroll in this course in the fall semester of the senior year if granted permission to explore a potential honors project and prepare a formal proposal to pursue honors work in geography. Permission to enroll in this course does not guarantee permission to pursue honors in geography.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOG 499 - Honors Studies in Geography


    Students pursuing honors research enroll in this course in the spring semester of the senior year. The research proposal must be approved by the Department of Geography.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL 101 - Environmental Geology


    Many geologic processes and events have a significant impact on human societies. Volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides and floods all threaten lives and property and societies rely on water, mineral, climate, and energy resources to thrive. Similarly, society has many impacts on the Earth system through water and air pollution and climate change. This course examines the complex interplay between human activities and the environment through a multi-disciplinary approach, with the goal of applying science to better manage natural hazard risk, understand and mitigate future climate change, and use water, mineral and energy resources more sustainably.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 101L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 101L - Environmental Geology Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 101 . Labs are field-based as much as possible and are designed, not only to build a deeper understanding of the course material, but also to provide hands-on experience with some of the scientific techniques geologists use to study the environment.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 101  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 102 - Sustainable Earth


    Focuses on Earth and its complex and life-sustaining resources, within an integrated framework including the terrestrial realm, the atmosphere, and the hydrosphere (freshwater, oceans, and glacial ice). Students develop a deeper understanding of the physical, chemical, biological and human interactions that determine the past, present and future states of Earth. Places a strong emphasis on the societal impacts of earth system science and provides a fundamental basis for understanding the world in which we seek to live sustainably.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 105 - Megageology


    A course tracing the history of the Earth from the origin of the solar system to the present. Also considered are the origin and evolution of the Earth’s crust and interior; plate tectonics, continental drift and mountain building; absolute age dating; the origin of the hydrosphere and atmosphere; earthquakes and volcanism. The results of recent planetary exploration are incorporated into an examination of the origin of the solar system.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 115 - Evolution: Dinosaurs to Darwin


    The origin and evolution of dinosaurs and extinct mammals, including human ancestors, are examined as a vehicle for understanding how geologic and environmental forces—plate tectonics, asteroid strikes, and climate change—have shaped life processes through time. Interactive exercises promote exploration of Darwin’s (r)evolutionary ideas and facilitate debates about dinosaur physiology, social behavior, and future cloning. Evaluating evidence for dinosaur and mega-mammal extinctions provides the basis for understanding the current extinction crisis and for exploring species conservation strategies during a time of rapid environmental change.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 120 - The Geology of America’s Parks (Extended Study)


    Designed to introduce students to geological processes, materials, and basic field techniques using sites at National Parks in the United States and Canada. Major goals include developing a facility with basic field methods used in geology and other natural sciences, promoting understanding of how regional geological history and active modern processes shape landscapes, and exploring the impacts of human interactions with the natural world.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least one course in geology or other introductory field-oriented science course
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 135 - Oceanography and the Environment


    A study of the major contemporary concepts of biological, chemical, geological, and physical oceanography. The nature and origin of ocean basins by global plate tectonics, sedimentation, sea water composition, water masses, oceanic circulation, waves, tides, life in the sea, and biological productivity, are all discussed. The role of human impacts and environmental change, including ocean warming and acidification, and marine pollution are stressed throughout the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 190 - Evolution of Planet Earth


    Explores our planet’s 4.5-billion year history and how geologists unearth the past through examination of minerals, rocks, and fossils. Earth’s evolution is a natural experiment that cannot be reproduced, and students make use of primary observational and interpretative tools that geologists use to understand the past. Age-dating techniques, plate tectonics and origin of continental crust, mountain building events, and evolution of Earth’s landscape, atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere are examined in the context of the geological evolution of North America.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 190L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Recommended: For students interested in concentrating in geology or environmental geology. 
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 190L - Evolution of Planet Earth Lab


    Required corequisite to  . Laboratory sessions focus on providing a familiarization with common rocks, minerals, and fossils, and geologic field techniques, with an emphasis on how these materials and techniques are used to understand Earth and its history.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 190  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 201 - Mineralogy and Geochemistry


    Rocks and minerals are the stuff of which planets are composed, the materials from which civilizations are built. This course is designed to help students understand how and when Earth’s materials were formed, their physical and chemical behavior, and how they both control and tell us about major processes on the planet.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 201L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 201L - Mineralogy and Geochemistry Lab


    Required corequisite to  . Labs introduce a variety of techniques used to study and identify minerals, including working with minerals in hand specimen, under the microscope, and using x-ray analysis.  Hands-on activities build a deeper understanding of crystal structures and optics, and a familiarity with the most common minerals that compose the Earth and influence geologic processes and the quality of life our planet.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 201  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 215 - Paleontology of Marine Life


    Considers the fossil record of marine life from its origin to the present, emphasizing the evolution of invertebrate animals and marine environments through time. In class, lab, and the field, students explore the anatomy, ecology, evolutionary history, and life-sustaining ecosystem services of shelly animals—from ancient to modern—that co-existed in reefs and adjacent habitats. Evolutionary events, including several biologic “revolutions,” are linked to dramatic environmental and climatic changes in Earth’s past. Familiarity with the record of past mass extinctions helps student gain facility in evaluating the magnitude of today’s biodiversity crisis and identifying best practice solutions for protecting marine environments during rapid global change.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 215L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190   or one course in geology or biology
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 215L - Paleontology of Marine Life Lab


    Required corequisite to  . Lab and field exercises emphasize hands-on learning about fossil preservation; classification, identification, and paleoecology of invertebrate organisms that inhabited reef and adjacent environments; and paleontological techniques (including dissections).

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 215  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 225 - Sedimentology and Surficial Processes


    A detailed study of modern sedimentary environments and their use in interpreting ancient sedimentary rocks. The chemical and physical processes leading to weathering, erosion, transport, deposition, and lithification of sediments are considered. Interpretation of local Paleozoic, Pleistocene, and Holocene sediments is carried out through field study projects. Economic aspects of sedimentary rocks, such as the occurrence of oil, natural gas, and coal, are discussed.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 225L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 302


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 225L - Sedimentology and Surficial Processes Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 225 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 225  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 302L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 235 - Tectonics and Earth Structure


    Mountain ranges, rifting continents and earthquakes show that the Earth is constantly deforming. This course serves as introduction to the principles of structural geology and geophysics, and explores the physical processes deforming Earth’s surface and interior and driving plate tectonics. Students will examine how and why deformation occurs, and what lines of evidence we use to study deformation on all scales, from the microscopic to global. The course will cover tectonic processes, brittle and ductile deformation mechanisms, earthquakes and seismic waves, and solid Earth properties.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 235L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 305


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 235L - Tectonics and Earth Structure Lab


    Required corequisite of GEOL 235.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 235  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 305L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 253 - Environmental Geochemistry and Analysis


    The focus of this interdisciplinary laboratory and field-based course is the development of practical skills essential to the study of natural systems. Through a series of student-designed local projects, students learn how to address environmental questions, including experimental design, collection and analysis of samples, interpretation of data, and presentation of conclusions. Specific skills include techniques for the chemical analysis of natural materials including rock, soil, and water, statistical analysis, sample collection, and methods of data presentation. Laboratory and lecture are fully integrated and meet once or twice a week. Occasional day-long sampling and field trips.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 253L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 203


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 253L - Environmental Geochemistry and Analysis Lab


    Required corequisite to  . There is no separation between lab and class, they are fully integrated; work on projects is the primary focus of the entire course. Occasional day-long sampling and field trips.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 253  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 203L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 260 - Volcanology


    Our fascination with volcanoes stems primarily from their awesome powers of destruction, yet their constructive role in shaping our landscape, atmosphere, and oceans has been crucial in Earth’s history. This course explores the fundamental concepts of volcanology, from the geological, chemical, and physical processes that generate volcanoes to the implications of volcanic activity on humankind. Through case studies, this course examines the tectonic environments that generate volcanoes and what they tell us about Earth’s internal processes; eruptive styles and volcanic forms; volcanic rocks; properties and generation of magmas; features of lava and pyroclastic flows; and volcanic hazards, including their prediction and mitigation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 260L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 220


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 260L - Volcanology Lab


    Required corequisite to  . Activities in the lab are widely varied, from learning important field techniques for understanding the eruptive history of volcanoes to exploring the physical principles behind volcanic behavior.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 260  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 220L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 270 - Geoinformatics


    Focuses on the application of digital analysis systems to geologic information. Global climate change, natural resource management, and geological hazards analysis are examples of complex systems that benefit from the use and interpretation of large-scale datasets. This course covers modern approaches to field and remote data collection, access and use of public data sources, digital manipulation and analysis of large datasets, and modeling and analysis of natural geological systems.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 230


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 301 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology


    Deals with the origin and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Petrology and melting of the mantle are examined, and the origin and differentiation of magmas in different tectonic settings are explored. Metamorphic rocks are examined using mineral assemblages, metamorphic facies, and thermobarometry with the goal of understanding the crustal history of mountain building. These topics are unified by concepts of plate tectonics. May include a weekend field trip.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 301L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 202


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 301L - Igneous and Metamorpic Petrology Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 301 . Laboratories involve the study of rock suites from classic areas around the world.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 301  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 202L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 310 - Environmental Economic Geology


    Examines the global distribution of mineral resources, the economic and engineering factors that govern their availability, and the environmental effects of their production and use. Mineral resources to be considered include ferrous and non-ferrous metals, precious metals, and energy fuels. Topics to be explored, in addition to the origin, nature, and geological settings of the world’s great mineral deposits, include mineral law, mineral exploration and production, strategic mineral reserves, minerals and human health, and environmental impact of mining and use, and remediation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: GEOL 301  
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 311 - Environmental and Exploration Geophysics


    Near-surface features of the Earth display a stunning variety of structures and compositions. These features give insight in the geology of a region, and can also be important in the fields of environmental studies, engineering, and archaeology. Many subsurface structures are not visible at the surface, but can be illuminated using geophysical measurements and modeling. In this course, students will learn the science behind several geophysical techniques, including gravity surveying, reflection and refraction seismology, GPS monitoring, and electric and magnetic methods. Two weekend field days are required.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 311L  
    Prerequisites: One geology course
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: One semester of calculus 
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 311L - Environmental and Exploration Geophysics Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 311 . Students will apply knowledge gained in the lectures to collect and model real-world geophysical datasets in this lab.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite:   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 317 - X-Ray and Clay Mineralogy


    X-ray and clay mineralogy is an integrated and detailed study of the nature of clay minerals and the methods of x-ray analysis. Through projects, lectures, and readings, students gain a thorough knowledge of x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence analytical techniques, and the mineralogy of clays and related minerals. Topics include x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence theory and applications; computer modeling of x-ray patterns; the structure and chemistry of clay minerals, their origin, and occurrence; clays and the origin of life; and the role of clays in weathering. Students complete an original research project making extensive use of the department’s modern x-ray facilities.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 318 - Coastal Geology


    A study of coastal geomorphology, sediments, and wave-related processes active in the present and geologic past. Major topics to be considered include beach, nearshore, and estuarine processes, barrier-island and salt-marsh development, Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations, human modifications and impacts, and erosional-depositional patterns induced by the interaction of physical and biological factors of the coastal environment.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 318L  
    Prerequisites: GEOL 190  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 217


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 318L - Coastal Geology Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 318 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 318  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 217L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 320 - Techniques of Field Geology


    A five-week summer field program introduces the basic field techniques used in geologic mapping. Students prepare geologic maps and stratigraphic sections in assigned map areas and develop geological histories, focusing on igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes. The course consists of field work in such locations as Colorado, Wyoming, and Idaho.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 335 - Hydrology and Geomorphology


    The geologic materials nearest the Earth’s surface are those that interact with the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. This course explores the nature of surficial geologic materials and processes by using geographic information system (GIS) tools and hydrological modeling software. Major topics are landform development, chemical weathering, soil development and quality, and surface and groundwater hydrology.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: GEOL 335L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: A previous earth science or geology course is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 210


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 335L - Hydrology and Geomorphology Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 335 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 335  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 210L


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 403 - Geochemistry


    Explores the fundamental chemical principles that govern how our planet came to be what it is today. In particular, focus will be on how to use chemistry as a tool to understand major geological processes, from the formation of the planet to processes that are particularly important to environmental quality, and thus to humans.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201  and CHEM 101  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 411 - Isotopes in the Earth Sciences


    The age of the Earth, genesis and growth of continents, global climate change, and the formation of the solar system are all understood primarily through isotope and trace element geochemistry. This course explores how geochemical tracers are used to understand processes in the Earth and solar system that are not possible to observe directly. Methods to be investigated include geochronology, radiogenic isotopes in magmatic systems, stable isotopes as applied to understanding fluids in low- and high-temperature environments, stable isotopes and the paleoclimate record, and the radiogenic and stable isotope cosmochemistry of meteorites and lunar samples. Current research in these fields is a focus.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201   (may be taken concurrently) and 3 other geology courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 416 - Marine Geology


    The course is designed to provide a realistic understanding of rapidly evolving concepts in the field of geological oceanography. Sedimentary and geophysical data are discussed in the context of global plate tectonics. These data are used to examine the processes responsible for the origin and evolution of continental margins and ocean basins and to reconstruct global climate history. When offered, the credit-bearing laboratory GEOL 416L  must be taken and passed concurrently with GEOL 416.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 225   Four geology courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 416L - Marine Geology Lab


    Required corequisite to GEOL 416 .

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: GEOL 416 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 418 - Tectonics Seminar


    Analyzes large-scale structures of the Earth’s crust and interior. There is particular emphasis on the interpretation of modern and ancient orogenic belts in terms of plate tectonics models. Includes discussion of the details of plate boundary structures and plate interactions, evolution of the Earth’s lithosphere through geologic time, and the use of isotopes in geological investigations. Student presentations are required.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 235   (may be taken concurrently)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 420 - Solid Earth Processes


    Focuses on how the Earth’s processes such as volcanism, plate motion, and mantle dynamics are studied by geologists. Through a seminar-style approach, students consider the techniques used to understand the solid Earth, with emphasis on volcanic and plate tectonic systems. Methods studied include (a) volcanic systems: gas, plume, and thermal monitoring for prediction of eruptions, lava chemistry, heat flow, geochronology, field observations, and lava flow dynamics; (b) plate tectonics: earthquake observations, ground deformation, and gravity; (c) planetary geology: remote sensing, spectroscopy, and plume sampling. Each technique is examined in the context of a specific case study (e.g., Mount Pinatubo, Hawaii, Yellowstone, Los Angeles fault zones, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter) through readings and discussions of current geological literature. Experts currently working in the field are often consulted as resources.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 430 - Seminar on Acid Rain


    Acid rain — more properly termed acid deposition — is a worldwide environmental problem that adversely affects lakes and streams, forest ecosystems, plants and animals, and human health. The course examines this environmental issue from the beginning of the industrial revolution to the present. The science of acid rain — from why and how it forms to what we know about its effects on ecosystems, earth materials, and people — is explored and discussed in detail. For decades, New York State received some of the most acidic deposition in the United States; therefore a portion of course time is spent examining the effects of acid deposition in central New York and the Adirondack Mountains, and the potential for recovery of ecosystems to pre-acid rain conditions. Finally, links between science and policy are explored through examination of the Clean Air Act and events leading up to this and subsequent landmark environmental enactments by Congress.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 201  and at least three additional geology courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 441 - Senior Research Seminar


    Students engaged in senior or honors research are required to register for this course designed to guide them in the proper preparation of a research paper or honors thesis. Students are instructed in research techniques, including library research, statistical analysis, and other approaches commonly used in the geosciences. Other matters addressed in this seminar include the format of the research paper or honors thesis, techniques of scientific writing, and how to prepare an oral presentation.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    GEOL 450 - Paleoclimatology


    Earth’s climate has fluctuated widely in the past, between warm periods and ice ages, and times of great drought versus wetter intervals. The planet currently faces abrupt climate change resulting from human-induced environmental modification. Paleoclimatology, the study of past climates and environments of the Earth, provides a long-term perspective on the nature of global climate variability that is critical for evaluating the sensitivity of the Earth system to past, present, and future changes. This course provides students with an overview of paleoclimatology by examining the use of proxy records such as marine and lake sediment sequences, ice cores, tree rings, corals, and historical data to reconstruct past climatic conditions. Dating methods are introduced, and seminal publications in paleoclimatology are reviewed in tandem with current research papers addressing outstanding questions in paleoclimatology. Throughout, students critically analyze their current understanding of past climates and environments, and identify promising directions for future research. Topics include abrupt climate change, human evolution and climate, biosphere-climate interactions, and paleoclimate modeling.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GEOL 215  or GEOL 225  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: GEOL 350


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

Page: 1 <- 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Forward 10 -> 19