2018-2019 University Catalogue 
    
    May 18, 2021  
2018-2019 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    ENGL 437 - Literature and Culture


    A study of seminal writings from the 100-year period between Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus (1834) and Ezra Pound’s Guide to Kulchur (1938). The course considers how the notion of culture has informed understanding of the nature and purpose of art and literature.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: One course in 19th-century British literature is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 441 - James Joyce


    A study of several of the author’s major works, including Ulysses.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Recommended: Prior course work in Shakespeare, 19th- or 20th-century narrative recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 443 - Modernist Poetry


    An advanced seminar in the work of one or several authors, examining the relations between modernist literary experiment and its cultural contexts.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: One course in 19th-century poetry is recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 444 - Modern Wisdom Literature


    Developing from the “wisdom literatures” of both Greco-Roman and Hebrew tradition, the modern aphorism is characterized by its brief and often pointed expression of an observation or precept. It differs from, say, maxims, proverbs, or apothegms in that it turns on paradox and antithesis; it differs from earlier forms in the ways it undermines rather than supports certainty. This seminar explores the relations of literary form to convictions about the nature and limits of human knowledge, habits of reading, and its uses in life. The course follows the transformation of the aphorism both as form and as impulse as it is reinvented in the Modern period-chiefly following the example of Friedrich Nietzsche-and explores its character as a lyrical corrective to overly definitive and linear ways of organizing and writing about experience.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 445 - Life Writing: The Renaissance


    An exploration of the relationship between life writing, as practiced by modern biographers of Renaissance subjects, together with the autobiography and “self-fashioning” practiced by early modern subjects. Emphasis is given to understanding of the literature and the cultural history of the early modern period as a narrative told by both early subjects and their later commentators. The scope of subjects extends across a variety of countries representing “characters” that include the Merchant, the Prince, the Artisan, and the Common Person. (Pre-1800 course.)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 447 - Studies in the 19th Century


    An advanced seminar in a topic, author, genre, or theme in English literature, 1798-1901.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 458 - Shakespeare’s Contemporaries


    English drama from the mid-16th century to the closing of the theaters in 1642, including plays by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, and others of Shakespeare’s contemporaries. (Pre-1800 course.)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: THEA 458 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 460 - Studies in the Middle Ages


    An advanced seminar in a topic - author, genre, or theme - in medieval British literature. (Pre-1800 course.)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 461 - Studies in the Renaissance


    An advanced seminar in a topic - author, genre, or theme - in English literature, 1580-1660. (Pre-1800 course.)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 477 - Advanced Workshop


    An advanced workshop in the writing of fiction, poetry, and/or creative nonfiction. Depending on the semester and the instructor, the course may be structured around a topic, a genre, or both. It will always include the study of literary texts, discussion of student work, and one-on-one conferences. Preference is given to students who have already taken at least one 300-level creative writing workshop and who are majoring in English with an emphasis in creative writing. While this course is required for all students pursuing honors in creative writing, it is also open to students who are not pursuing honors. This course does not fulfill the major requirement for a 400-level seminar in literature.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Instructor approval on the basis of writing samples
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 489 - Preparation for Honors in English Literature


    This seminar, taken in the senior year, is required of all English majors pursuing a scholarly honors project. The course has a twofold purpose. First, on a theoretical level, it problematizes familiar attitudes about and approaches to literary texts and contexts, while introducing students to the methodologies of twenty-first-century scholarship. Second, it inaugurates honors research, requiring the completion of essential preliminary tasks for the thesis that will be written in the spring.

    Credits: 0.25
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENGL 490 - Special Studies for Honors Candidates


    Writing the honors essay. This course must be taken in addition to the nine courses required for the major in English literature and the eleven courses required for the major in English with an emphasis in creative writing.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENGL 492 - English Department Fellowship


    Individually supervised studies for students selected by the department.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Environmental Studies

  
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    ENST 202 - Environmental Ethics


    An introduction to the field of environmental ethics. Several key figures and philosophies in the environmental movement are studied and critically analyzed, with a particular emphasis on ethical reasoning and its influences on environmental policies and practices. Topics to be discussed include animal rights and the ethical treatment of animals, intrinsic and instrumental evaluations of the natural world and its inhabitants, the value(s) of species and ecosystems, the nature and extent of our obligations to address climate change, as well as central questions of consumption and population ethics in the context of sustainability.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: PHIL 202  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 219 - American Literature and the Environment


    An introduction to literary study that focuses on human responses to their environments and ecologies. This course explores representations of relationships between people, places, and animals in American fiction, poetry, and non-fiction from the early American Renaissance to the postmodern period. Questions of how environments are inflected by gender and racial positions, as well as literature’s insights into issues of environmental justice and sustainability, are addressed through works by writers such as Wendell Berry, Charles Chesnutt, Annie Dillard, William Faulkner, bell hooks, Aldo Leopold, Marilynne Robinson, Wallace Stevens, and Jean Toomer.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 219 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 232 - Environmental Justice


    In the wake of the environmental movement and the civil rights movement rose a crosscurrent of issues combining problems of social justice and environmental issues. During the past two decades, this crosscurrent has swelled to produce a new social movement: the environmental justice movement. This course explores the terms and ideas of environmental justice by addressing the key issues of environmental racism, distributive justice, political and cultural representation in environmental struggles, alternative theories of justice generated from disenfranchised groups, grassroots politics, and concepts of environmental identity. These issues are introduced and discussed mainly in the context of the U.S. environmental justice movement, with some international context highlighted periodically.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 233 - Global Environmental Health Issues


    Environmental health is a field of interdisciplinary study that integrates human society and behavior with ecological processes to understand environmental dimensions of human health. This course focuses on knowledge generated in the natural and social sciences that concerns human-environmental interactions and its implications for human health risk. It introduces students to the conceptual and empirical underpinnings of the direct and indirect relationships between environment and health, approaches to measuring these relationships, and the ways in which health policies, programs, and clinical practices have been organized to reduce risk at various geographic scales: locally, nationally, and internationally. Regional implications of global climate and other global processes provide an important context for the course. This course also explicitly demonstrates the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to investigating questions in global environmental health and the complexity of environmental analysis.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 240 - Sustainability: Science and Analysis


    Using scientific evidence and tools, this course presents sustainability issues and solutions through environmental science and engineering perspectives. Students will learn about the theories and evidence behind major environmental phenomena, and students will use scientifically-grounded arguments to think critically about complex environmental challenges and possible sustainable solutions. Topics to be discussed include dependency on fossil fuels, the stress of population growth and consumption on the environment, and recycling. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct several hands-on experiments and to analyze data using statistics.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Natural Sciences & Mathematics
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENST 241 - Sustainability and Climate Action Planning


    Explores the initiatives, programs and policies being implemented at the local and regional government level to promote sustainability and address climate change. Students will investigate diverse policy pathways from national and local case studies. Students will work in groups with community partners, including some in the upstate New York region, to solve complex challenges facing local governments and organizations trying to enact meaningful climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies, and sustainability-related policy. These projects will be informed by different theoretical orientations to sustainability, allowing students to gain practical experience in civic engagement and policy making.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 250 - Environmental Policy Analysis


    Explores the theories and methods of policy analysis as applied to U.S. environmental policymaking. Policy analysis is an applied social science that draws on diverse methods to generate information designed to be used in political settings and inform policy decisions. Specific environmental issues such as pollution regulation, wildlife and ecosystem management, and climate/energy issues will be explored. Students learn, among other skills, to: define problems using data to describe environmental change, construct policy alternatives using various analytical techniques, define evaluative criteria, assess the alternatives, and draw conclusions.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 309 - Australian Environmental Issues (Study Group)


    Covers key geographic and environmental issues in Australia with a particular focus on environmental diversity. Through class lectures and discussion, critical reading, independent research papers, and field trips, students consider how the geologic and environmental history of Australia shaped biodiversity, and how humans have affected these natural communities. Field excursions will introduce students to Australia’s rich and diverse flora and fauna, its environmental and cultural heritage, and illustrate current challenges in environmental protection and management. Trips within New South Wales include: Sydney, Canberra, Jervis Bay, Royal National Park, Budderoo National Park and Port Kembla. An additional 5 day trip takes the group to Queensland to visit the Atherton Tablelands, tropical rainforests and the Great Barrier Reef.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 313 - Environmental Problems and Environmental Activism in the People’s Republic of China


    Explores China’s complex environmental issues, their historical roots, and social implications. It also examines the rise of environmental social activism in China. The course will utilize pedagogical methods from InterGroup Relations (IGR) to provide students with the intellectual tools to analyze issues of power, privilege, and identity and by extension, their own position in the world in relation to these environmental issues. This course is linked to an extended study to China. Students will travel to the People’s Republic of China, where they will examine sites of environmental problems, but also meet activists and see their work in progress. The trip will also bring to the forefront some of the issues of power, privilege, and race issues that were discussed in the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ASIA 313  & SOCI 313 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 313E - Environmental Problems and Environmental Activism in the People’s Republic of China (Extended Study)


    This extended study is linked to the on-campus course ENST 313 . Students will travel to the People’s Republic of China, where they will examine sites of environmental problems, but also meet activists and see their work in progress. The trip will also bring to the forefront some of the issues of power, privilege, and race issues that were discussed in the course.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted: ASIA 313E  & SOCI 313E 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 313L - Environmental Problems and Environmental Activism in the People’s Republic of China Lab


    Examines the rise of environmental social activism in China; the historical, political, cultural, and economic roots of China’s current environmental problems, including deforestation, air pollution, water pollution, and species loss. Students learn theories of environmental justice and explore the rise of environmental activism in the PRC. The course will utilize pedagogical methods from InterGroup Dialogue (IGD) to provide students with the intellectual tools to analyze issues of power, privilege, and identity and by extension, their own position in the world in relation to these environmental issues.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ASIA 313L  & SOCI 313L 
    Corequisite: ENST 313  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 315 - Applied Natural Resource Conservation


    This community-based research course challenges students to work with local land trusts in solving meaningful environmental problems. Land trusts are non-profit organizations with missions to protect natural resources (e.g., clean water, forests, and open space) of value to their members. Students will work as members of an interdisciplinary team to develop solutions to complex problems faced by land trusts in central New York. Lectures and discussions regarding conservation theory and practices provide an intellectual framework for these applied projects. Students will gain practical experience working in interdisciplinary teams and using contemporary technologies to facilitate effective collaboration.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least two courses related to environmental studies
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: BIOL 330 
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 316 - Nature, Technology, and the Human Prospect


    Explores the complex interrelationships among Nature, technology, and people, especially the interactions that reconfigure what it means to be human. The aggregate significance of modern technologies is radically transforming the natural and human-built world in good and bad ways, even within remote societies and ecosystems. How do technologies control or influence the ways people value parts of the world over other parts, the ways they value the moment over the future and the past, the ways they value rapid change and innovation over long-standing traditions and slow-changing landscapes? These are some of the complex moral issues raised by the technological enhancement across the globe that is examined by careful reading, writing, argumentative discourse.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 319 - Food


    Food is fundamental — it sustains us and is essential for our survival — but food is more than just what we eat. Food is also a commodity with complex global markets and ecological impacts; it is highly regulated through our political processes and institutions; and it forms a key part of our culture and the social rhythms of everyday life. This course explores these many dimensions of food, focusing especially on key questions about where it comes from, how it is produced, and how it is embedded in our economic, political, and cultural institutions. Students participate in a service learning internship at Common Thread Community Farm in Madison, NY. The course also involves field trips to and guest speakers from local food and farming communities.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: SOCI 319 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: ENST 232  or (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) and students must have an open morning (no other enrolled courses) on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday, from 8 a.m. until 12 p.m., in order to accommodate the farm internship component of the course.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 321 - Global Environmental Justice


    Global environmental justice examines both procedural and distributive inequities as well as injustices in political relationships among nation states. Additionally, it places emphasis on a variety of global political issues, which have evolved from environmental concerns that transcend national boundaries. This intermediate course expounds on the concepts and theories of environmental justice from an international perspective. It evaluates the international frame of environmental justice from a human rights perspective and its applicability to different case studies. A close examination of the theoretical North-South relationship, in terms of dependency and exploitation of peripheral (South) countries by core (North) countries, is central to the course. It analyzes a constellation of issues labeled as global environmental justice, such as tribal exterminations, dislocations of marginalized communities, and resource conflicts. Real world examples of environmental justice cases are critically assessed to develop an understanding of the complex relationships among actors that lead to environmental injustices.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 324 - Hunting, Eating, Vegetarianism


    Historically, hunting for food has represented one of the most direct ways in which people have engaged with nature. Some scholars even believe that the “hunting instinct” is a fundamental aspect of human identity. People in modern industrialized societies, however, often have little idea about the origins of the flesh they consume, most of which is raised and slaughtered on an industrial-scale. While the majority continue to eat meat, poultry, and/or fish, a minority have chosen to become locavores, vegetarians, or even vegans for ethical, religious, cultural, health-oriented, or environmental reasons. Others continue to hunt and fish but within ecosystems dramatically altered by human intervention and amidst cultural landscapes complicated by commercialized and trophy hunting. Drawing upon a wide range of sources including literature, artistic and documentary films, works of popular culture, autobiographical accounts, online hunting (and anti-hunting) forums, diverse web resources, self-reflective essays, and scholarly approaches ranging from animal studies to humanistic ecocriticism, this course investigates the intertwined themes of hunting, industrial versus family farming and slaughter, eating, vegetarianism, and the ethical and existential choices they present to members of modern industrialized societies. Fishing and fish farming are also considered more briefly.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 333 - Environment and Community Health in Africa: A Case Study in Rural Uganda (Extended Study)


    The majority of this extended study is held in villages proximate to Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in southwestern Uganda. The curriculum focuses on health issues including disease prevalence and access to health care in remote villages adjacent to national parks. Ecological dimensions of human health are considered including infectious disease transmission, sanitation and access to water, nutrition and household environment. Students participate in the following educational projects with a diverse array of community leaders: 1) training workshops in research methods for clinical and community health; 2) field studies with health professionals to improve health data collection; 3) community outreach to understand environmental and community health assets and needs in the region. Ideally, students should bring background and interests in environmental studies, biology and geography. Prior research experience is not necessary; however, to be eligible, students must register for or have successfully completed one of the following courses: BIOL 220, BIOL 330 , BIOL 364 , BIOL 371 , BIOL 491 (Frey); GEOG 245 , GEOG 314 , GEOG 316 , GEOG 336 , GEOG 491 (Scull or Kraly).

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: BIOL 220 or BIOL 330  or BIOL 364  or BIOL 371  or GEOG 245  or GEOG 314  or GEOG 316  or GEOG 336  (prerequisite may be taken concurrently)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 336 - Renewable Energy: Research and Implementation


    Finding energy resources that minimize damage to the environment is a challenge that today’s students will face throughout their lives. This course introduces students to renewable energy technologies as well as the issues involved in carbon capture and storage from fossil fuels. Class meetings are augmented with field trips to sites at which renewable technology is being researched or implemented.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 336E - Renewable Energy: Research and Implementation (Extended Study)


    This extended study course gives students the opportunity to learn about current research on renewable energy in Norway and also learn about a very different set of beliefs regarding environmental protest than is common in the U.S. Norway has a strong commitment to mitigating global warning that is shown both in its support of research on renewable energy and its willingness to tax fossil fuel energy. In addition to visiting research labs and government offices, student also see some of Norway’s famous fjords and glaciers in order to understand the northern landscapes that are threatened by global warming.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: ENST 336 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 340 - Environmental Cleanup: Methods and Regulation


    Introduces students to the major hazardous environmental pollution problems in the US and the regulatory framework within which these problems are managed. Students will be challenged to examine the processes and structures that lead to hazardous environmental pollution, the strategies that are used to clean up environmentally polluted spaces and determine the major hazardous pollutants that are of highest concern for federal regulators. Additionally, students will critically assess the current regulatory framework for environmental pollution control, determining the strengths and weaknesses of these statues. Finally students will be presented with the opportunity to research and develop cleanup plans for a specific contaminated site based on field trips to local sites.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 344 - Managing Complexity: America’s Public Lands


    Public land management is inherently complex. Typically there are multiple interested parties and potentially competing goals such as wilderness preservation, recreational accessibility, and resource exploitation. Also, the management of public lands may rest with several agencies. Management decisions made in pursuit of one goal often have implications for other goals, stakeholders, and management agencies. Complexity theory offers a new perspective for understanding the complicated workings of ecosystems, economies, and political systems. Such complex adaptive systems are characterized by feedback loops, chaos, nonlinear dynamics, self-organization, and emergence. The aims of this course are to investigate alternative public land management strategies and apply complexity theory 1) to model qualitatively the intricacies of both natural and human-built systems, 2) to propose and evaluate fresh ecological strategies and management policies for conserving public lands, and 3) to investigate new procedures for mitigating tension among competing interests in the use of public land. The course includes some weekend field trips.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least two courses related to environmental studies
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 345 - Water Pollution: Chemistry and Environmental Engineering


    Examines how chemical properties affect water contaminants’ movement in aquatic systems. Using principles of science and engineering, students will examine the toxicity of different manmade and naturally occurring chemicals, applying polynomials and chemistry principles to real world environmental conditions. Students develop scientific analytical skills that will help them to understand the broader field of environmental chemistry. Students explore a range of topics including the acidity (pH) of water and its effect on chemicals’ solubility, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and the dissolution of gasses such as carbon dioxide (C02).

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 390 - Community-based Study of Environmental Issues


    This project-based, interdisciplinary course examines current environmental issues in the context of community-based learning. Topics for investigation are selected by faculty, usually in conjunction with the campus sustainability coordinator, the Upstate Institute, or directly with local and regional agencies or organizations. Students get practical experience working in interdisciplinary teams to examine environmental issues with a goal of developing relevant recommendations.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least two courses related to environmental studies
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: ENST 202  and ENST 232  are strongly recommended.
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    ENST 490 - Seminar in Environmental Studies


    In this senior seminar, students discuss the relevant literature (from multiple disciplines) and do research on one or more selected environmental issue or issues, chosen by the instructor. Topics differ from year to year. The goal is to achieve an advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of contemporary environmental issues.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: ENST 390 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Environmental Studies, Environmental Geology, Environmental Geography, Environmental Biology, Environmental Economics Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Restrictions: Senior ENST majors & minors only; others by permission
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    ENST 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Film and Media Studies

  
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    FMST 200 - Introduction to Film and Media Studies


    From the films we watch to the personal profiles we maintain online, media saturates our lives. Film and mass media can be powerful determinants of ideology, identity, and historical consciousness. This course is a historical survey of media technologies and environments, combining course readings with a required weekly film screening. The theoretical concepts introduced in this course enable students to critically approach the visual culture around them: just how immersed are we in the virtual, and what are the strategies for engaging with or disengaging from virtual worlds? Students learn to respond to film and media as proactive, critical, and articulate viewers. Students also acquire the vocabulary, conceptual strategies, and interpretive skills necessary to closely analyze the form and content of film and media, as well as the ability to set their own relation to the ideologies all representations convey.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 200L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 200L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to FMST 200 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: FMST 200 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 210 - Global Cinema


    Explores the production and reception of film in a global context, as well as the various ways individuals and communities around the world create and receive film. Students explore the concept of “national cinema,” the interplay of local aesthetic traditions and transnational industrial and artistic practices, the role of cinema in diasporic communities, and the impact of global capitalism on film production, distribution, and exhibition. Films depicting immigration, exile, the refugee, insider/outsider status, and other modes of geographic movement are explored.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 210L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 212 - Global Media: Flows & Counterflows


    Regulating and being regulated by a variety of information flows on a daily basis from SMS texts, snapchats, and tweets, to live news feeds, corporate data transfers, and government communiques. We increasingly experience our private and public lives as a hypermediated encounter with the world at large. What impact do these media flows have on our experiences of the local and the global? Simultaneously, how should we understand contemporary mass media themselves as “global”? Have transformations in print, broadcast, and digital media fundamentally altered how we think of the near and the far, the familiar and the foreign, the national and the transnational, the West and the non-West? This course will address these questions through the two structuring notions of the “flow” and the “counter-flow,” and analyze the role that media play as both a unifying and a divisive agent, consolidating identities and nationalisms in some instances, and de-territorializing the same in others.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 212L 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 230 - LGBTQ Cinema/Transnational


    Examines lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer film cultures from transnational and global perspectives. Courses on LGBTQ cinema most often focus on North America and Western Europe, well-known for their prolific output of gay, lesbian, and transgender film and media. Less frequently included are the wide range of films produced (since the 1980s and 1990s) from India, Thailand, Hong Kong, Egypt, Tunisia, Guinea, Uganda, Israel, and Russia. Analzying these films alongside contemporary theoretical discussions of gender and sexuality, students will explore how LGBTQ concerns from non-Western countries continue to test the possibilities of film and media aesthetics and politics, and bring the cinematic form in dialogue with the complexities and geopolitics of gender and sexuality.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 230L  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 230L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to FMST 230 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: FMST 230 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 246 - Introduction to Performance Studies


    What is performance? The verb “to perform” can be variously defined as “to carry out an action,” “to discharge a duty,” “to accomplish a task,” and “to present to an audience.” Interdisciplinary in nature, students explores performance in the context of the performing and media arts, as well as in the context of ritual, politics, and everyday life. Emphasizes the relationship between performance and race, gender, sexuality, and other vectors of identity: how are various types of difference enacted, articulated, and represented through performative acts?

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: THEA 246   
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 320 - European Film History and Theory


    An introduction to the methods, concepts, movements, and reception of European cinema from 1945 to the present. Selectively surveying the history and theory of Western, Central, and Eastern European filmmaking, students juxtapose the close study of narrative and film form with theoretical texts. From neorealism to the transnational in film, from the postcolonial to double occupancies, lessons emphasize the historic hybridity of commercial and experimental film in Europe and complicate auteurist approaches to European film culture. The postwar thematic motifs which continually surface in European film’s changing social and aesthetic landscape (marginality, desire, and the metropolis) is a focal point of discussion and reflection.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 320L  
    Prerequisites: FMST 200  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 324 - Cinema, Sensation, & Body


    To what extent does watching a movie imitate the body’s own sensorial encounters with the world? How do filmmakers use color, sound, lighting, movement, editing and space to create embodied experience? This course is an introduction to these and related questions by examining both cinema’s bodily representations, and the relationship between the viewer’s body and the events on the screen. The approach is organized around weekly film screenings that include silent film, art cinema, experimental cinema, classical Hollywood melodrama, and the horror film. Readings explore phenomenological theories of the body by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Vivian Sobchack, Jennifer Baker, Elena del Rio, Laura Marks, Martine Beugnet, and Steven Shaviro. Students explore related approaches such as affect theory, feminism, and the relationship of bodily representation to painting, especially in the depiction of masochism.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 324L 
    Prerequisites: FMST 200  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 333 - Documentary Film


    Surveys the traditions of personal, experimental, ethnographic, and political documentary filmmaking. This overview of the history and aesthetics of documentary examines its origins, forms, goals, and contemporary styles while at the same time problematizing its canonical readings and reception. Issues covered include documentary styles, documentary representation of history and memory, the filmmaker’s relationship to the subject and the viewer, and the impact of technology on documentary techniques. Particular attention is paid to the influence that certain social and political movements have had on documentaries and filmmakers. A required film series accompanying the class includes works by directors such as Flaherty, Riefenstahl, Wiseman, Rouch, Morris, Moffatt, and many others.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 333L  
    Prerequisites: FMST 200   or a cinema studies course
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 340 - Music, Film, and Media


    Explores the various ways in which sound and music have functioned in visual and sonic media. Tracing the history of sound(ing) media from the advent of the phonograph and the rise of radio through silent film and classical Hollywood cinema, to the concept album and music on television, and finally, to the turn to the digital and sound “in the cloud,” students examine a series of musical media “objects” and the theory, rhetoric, and practice that has surrounded them. Particular attention will be devoted to the integration of film, music, and media industries and the ways in which music and sound work with other elements of film and media to reflect and construct social and cultural identities. Through readings, screenings, and written assignments, students acquire the tools and language to analyze and discuss the complex ways in which music, film, and media interact.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: FMST 340L  
    Prerequisites: FMST 200  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FMST 341E - Performing & Media Arts in Hong Kong (Extended Study)


    A three-week extended study course in the spring. The course offers students an immersive experience in Hong Kong’s vibrant performing and media arts scene. It includes visits to live performances, film screenings, museums, and galleries, as well as lectures and walking tours with Hong Kong-based scholars on the city’s history, arts, and culture.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted:   
    Prerequisites:   or (  or  )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 360 - The Cultural History of the Internet


    Examines the emergence, development, and socio-political outcomes of the explosion of online networks and social groups in the 20th and 21st Century. As the lines between the virtual and the real comingle with increasing fluidity, the defining characteristics of community, society, democracy, nation, and selfhood are fundamentally transformed. The hyper-accelerated and globalizing force of the Internet has been met with triumphalism from cyber-utopians and vehement caution from skeptics. Only one thing is certain, the organizing forces of online life have transformed the social fabric of global society. Examining the fluctuating character of citizenship, community, social identity, leisure, labor and economy, love and sexuality, privacy, and social mobilization, we will examine a cross-section of literature on post-Internet life.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: FMST 200  or ARTS 100  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 374 - Anthropology of Media: Mass-Mediated Cultures


    Examines media in local, national, and global contexts. More specifically, it draws on media theory and on specific ethnographic cases to discern the social force of modern mass-mediated communication within and across contemporary cultures. Topics include the technologization of old media, language and performance; the emergence of mass-mediated “imagined” communities; and new media social networks.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ANTH 374 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FMST 375 - Media and Politics


    Uses a social scientific approach to examine the role that the media plays in American politics. Key areas of inquiry include the function of the media in democracy, the news-making process, campaigning through the news, political advertising, media effects, governing through the news, and infotainment/satire.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: SOCI 375  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) or FMST 200  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Sociology & Anthropology, Sociology, Film & Media Studies Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FMST 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 400 - Special Topics in Film and Media Studies


    This seminar offers an advanced level study of a specific and narrowed field within the discipline of film and media studies. Each year, this course focuses on topics that reflect the breadth of film and media studies at Colgate. Faculty teach in the area of their scholarly expertise on a rotating basis. The seminar may focus on an in-depth study of a filmmaker, or a school of film, or genre, or focus on an advanced study of the history and theory of television or media, among other things.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: FMST 200  and one additional cinema studies course in the FMST minor
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  
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    FMST 490 - Senior Seminar in Film and Media Studies


    Examines a constellation of debates, topics, and methods in film and media studies. Emphasis is placed on close analysis of media objects, critical evaluation of contemporary film and media theory and methodologies, and the application of interdisciplinary approaches. Topics for consideration might include: modernity and mass culture; media aesthetics, politics, and power;  film and media historiography;  spectatorship practices; media and identity; film and the digital; media installations and site specificity; and spectacle and surveillance.

    Credits: 1.0
    When Offered: Fall only

    Prerequisites:
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Film and Media Studies Majors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FMST 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



French

  
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    FREN 121 - Introduction to French Language & Culture I


    The FREN 121,122 sequence is a highly interactive course that introduces students to the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in the French language. The sequence acquaints students with the rich world of Francophone culture through conversations, the discussion of short texts, the French language table and coffee hours, film, and other resources. Online tools help students understand and appreciate the nuances of French grammar, vocabulary, and expression. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 122 - Introduction to French Language & Culture II


    FREN 122 builds upon the skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in the French language acquired in FREN 121. Increased proficiency in speaking is achieved through class presentations, debates, films and discussions relating to contemporary issues in the Francophone world. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 195 - Elementary-Level French Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French: Conversation and Composition


    Designed to improve students’ ability to understand, speak, read, and write French. Class time is devoted to communication activities, a study of intermediate grammar, conversational vocabulary, and Francophone culture. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two or three years of secondary-school French, or a one- year college elementary French course.
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Not open to students who score 3 or higher on the French AP language exam
    Recommended: May be taken as a refresher course by students who studied French in secondary school as follows: three years of study ending at least one-half year before, four years of study ending at least a year and a half before.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 202 - Intermediate French: Conversation, Culture, and Literature


    Designed to increase the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write French, this course emphasizes development of reading comprehension. A review of the more difficult points of intermediate grammar is included. A major focus is the acquisition of skills necessary for the study of literature. This course includes vocabulary study, conversational practice, and short compositions based on readings. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Three to four years of secondary-school French, or FREN 201  or equivalent
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Not open to students who have received credit for 202 by scoring 4 on the AP exam
    Recommended: Students with more than four years of HS French should not register for FR 202. Those students should register for the appropriate 300-level courses.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 222 - French Literature in Translation


    Analyzes some outstanding works of French literature that are available in translation. Works are chosen from various periods and are considered within their historical and cultural context. Taught in English.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 295 - Intermediate-Level French Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 351 - Introduction to French Literature: From Chivalry to Versailles


    As an introduction, through reading and discussion, to three diverse and formative periods of French literature, this course shows the inspiration and variety of expression that mark each period. Readings include selections from La Chanson de Roland, courtly romance, the fabliaux (all medieval writings are read in modern French versions); prose and poetry of Renaissance France; tragic and comic writers of the French classical theater. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course in French may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 352 - Introduction to French Literature: Birth of the Modern


    Studies major works, principal authors, and literary movements of French literature in the 18th and 19th centuries. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course in French may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 353 - Introduction to French Literature: Literary Innovations in the 20th to 21st Centuries


    Offers a close reading of some representative works of the 20th and 21st centuries. Selections are chosen from the shorter fiction and essays of outstanding French writers and include such authors as Apollinaire, Gide, Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Ponge, Ernaux and Modiano. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course in French may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 354 - Introduction to French Literature: The Francophone World


    Offers an overview of various bodies of literature written in French outside of France, focusing on five main geographical areas that historically constituted the French empire: the Caribbean, North Africa, West and Central Africa, Asia, and North America. Full texts as well as excerpts from a variety of genres are studied in the context of the history and geography of those regions. Through the exploration of key literary texts, particular attention is given to the effects of colonialism on language, identity, and artistic creation. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 354  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course in French may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 361 - French Composition, Grammar, and Conversation


    Structured as a review of grammatical principles with emphasis on correctness in expository composition in French. Not open to students who score 5 on the AP language exam, except by special permission of instructor. Must be taken on campus to fulfill major or minor requirements. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Not open to students with a score of 5 on AP language exam, except by permission of instructor. Must be taken on campus to fulfill major or minor requirements.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 395 - Advanced-Level French Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 401 - Stylistics (Dijon Study Group)


    A study of cultural expression through the writing of formal compositions and the analysis and translation of texts. The course is designed to give advanced students a finer feeling for French style, an awareness of shades of meaning, and a mastery of certain difficulties not discussed in lower-level language courses.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 421 - The Baroque and Classic Theater in France


    This seminar traces the development of French theater through close readings of major and influential theatrical works from the 17th and 18th centuries. Major dramatic genres such as tragedy, comedy, and Romantic drama and their development are examined in their historical and cultural contexts. Through critical readings of these plays, the course identifies an evolving sensibility concerning the definition of the hero and the contingencies of fate, love, and personal choice. The course considers as well the shifting set of literary conventions through which playwright and audience negotiated these ideas. Authors studied may include Corneille, Racine, Molière, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 423 - The 18th-Century Epistolary Novel in France


    Examines some of the French 18th century’s most celebrated “letter novels.” Through readings of Montesquieu, Graffigny, Rousseau, and Laclos, the course focuses on the formal and thematic development of the epistolary genre over a period of some 60 years. The novels are read against a historical background stretching from the reign of Louis XIV through the French Revolution.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 425 - Libertine Fiction of the French 18th Century


    Beginning in the 17th century under the label libertinage érudit, libertine fiction evolves into a major genre in the Enlightenment. The course follows its development through readings of Prèvost, Crébillon fils, Diderot, Denon, and Sade, and explores the following questions: How do philosophy, fiction, and sexual politics coalesce in libertine literature? How can one reconcile libertinage - a way of living and writing frequently reduced to passion and sensuality - with the broader currents of the most “rational” century in French literary history? An exploration of libertine literature thus entails a focus on cultural history, and serves as a point of departure for a broader reflection on the Enlightenment.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    FREN 427 - Literature of the Renaissance


    A detailed study of the lyric poetry of Louise Labé, Pierre Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay, and Clément Marot. The course explores how each writer seeks to create his or her own unique poetic style within the context of the intense literary creation and experimentation that characterize Renaissance France. Special attention is given to the themes of love and Classical mythology as sources of poetic inspiration. Some attention to Renaissance painting, to the lyric poetry of François Villon, and to selected prose of Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, and Rabelais is given in order to illustrate the enormous and varied impact of humanism and the Italian Renaissance.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 429 - The Age of Enlightenment


    Examines some of the relationships between Enlightenment thought and the dominant forms of written expression in the French 18th century. Through readings, students consider a number of the Enlightenment’s most pressing concerns, such as moral and political philosophy, religious and civil tolerance, natural law, and the role of literature and the arts in society, among others. Authors read include Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Beaumarchais, and Sade.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 430 - Literature of Adventure and Quest


    Studies the evolution and transmutation of conventions of quest literature from the Middle Ages to the present day. Examines the significance of the changes within the genre as reflections of the cultures from which they emerge. Readings range from the romances of Chrétien de Troyes to the contemporary French novel.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 431 - Molière and La Fontaine


    The course provides a detailed study of two major comic writers of French classical literature, emphasizing especially the creation of individual comic and satirical styles within the classical tradition. The course examines both specific themes such as the images of king, court, and society, and also more general literary and cultural questions. These include the nature of comedy, the relationship between popular culture and literary art, and the problem of literary translation. Readings are drawn from the farces, short plays, and major works of Molière and from the Fables, the Contes et nouvelles, and selected minor poems of La Fontaine, as well as from La Fontaine’s legacy in pictorial art and folklore.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 433 - The Court of Louis XIV


    The theme of the court is used to explore the major works in prose and poetry of classical France, reading these works as examples both of insightful social analysis and of outstanding achievements in literary style and art. Readings are drawn primarily from the works of Madame de Sévigné, Racine, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Madame de Lafayette, and La Bruyère. Key topics include the relationship between writer and society in 17th-century France, Versailles as a theatrical setting for the Sun-King, and literature as both social commentary and divertissement. The seminar also studies the theme of the court as it is expressed in 17th-century painting and music.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 440 - Contemporary French Civilization (Dijon Study Group)


    Examines, by means of lecture and discussion, the impact of geography, demography, history, politics, economics, patterns of behavior, and the French cultural heritage on contemporary France.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 441 - Readings in French Poetry I


    Focuses on some of the major poets of the 19th century, by studying their work in the context of the greater political, social, and historical events of the time. Readings concentrate on representative texts of the following poets: Lamartine, Alfred de Vigny, Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, and others.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 443 - Readings in French Poetry II


    Studies some of the major poets of the 20th and 21st centuries in the context of the greater artistic, political, and social movements of their time. Readings focus on representative texts of the following poets: Apollinaire, Claudel, Valery, Breton, Jouve, Ponge, Jaccottet, and Bonnefoy. One dimension of the course will involve student translations of various poems throughout the semester. Each student will thereby create an anthology of poems in translation to be shared during a public reading at the end of the term.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 445 - 20th-Century French Autobiography


    Examines the development and specificities of 20th-century autobiographical texts. While the main focus is on the texts themselves, some related theoretical problems are also considered, such as the conditions and possibility of writing the “self”; autobiography’s link to other types of personal writings; its relationship to fiction; and its role in our modern definition of “humanity.” This genre being rooted in questions of the emergence of the “self,” particular attention is given to women, homosexuals, and Francophone writers, who were traditionally regarded as “other.” Authors read may include Proust, Gide, Sartre, Beauvoir, Sarraute, Leiris, Yourcenar, Bigras, Laye, Leduc, and Roy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 447 - The French Novel in the Romantic Period


    Focuses on the novel in the first half of the 19th century. The texts selected for discussion, as well as the visual materials used in the course, are centered on the representation of the hero in crisis in post-revolutionary France. The course examines critically such issues as le mal du siècle, changing conceptions of the self and gender relations in the wake of the French Revolution, social ambition and the desire to succeed, and the impact of the city on the individual. Works by such authors as Chateaubriand, Mme de Duras, Hugo, Sand, Constant, Stendhal, and Balzac are studied in the context of the dominant literary mode of Romanticism and the changing political and social scene under the Restoration and the July Monarchy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 449 - The Realist and Naturalist Novel


    This seminar focuses on the novel in the second half of the 19th century. Works by such authors as Dumas fils, Flaubert, Maupassant, Daudet, and Zola are studied in the context of the literary modes of realism and naturalism, and their reaction against Romanticism. The texts selected for discussion, as well as the visual materials used in the course, are usually centered on the representation of women, changing definitions of femininity and masculinity, and leading social and ideological issues of the time.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 450 - 20th-Century French Literature


    This seminar examines some of the most important novels and plays of the first half of the 20th century, until World War II. Authors read generally include Gide, Proust, Breton, Malraux, and Giraudoux. The following questions are discussed: How did these writers see their role in the rapidly changing social and political climate of the period? How did they transform the two dominant literary modes of the end of the 19th century (naturalism and symbolism) to express more modern concerns? How is one to understand the emergence of an introspective hero who so often searches for his or her identity on the margins of society?

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    FREN 453 - Contemporary French Literature


    This seminar examines how questions of identity, agency, intersectionality, and individual and collective responsibility inform major works of French literature of the late 20th and 21st centuries, and how literature can be used to make sense of them. Authors may include de Beauvoir, Duras, Sarraute, Djebar, Bey, and Cixous.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two 350-level French literature courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

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