2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
    Aug 14, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

German

  
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    GERM 485L - Required Film Screening


    Required corequisite to GERM 485 .

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: GERM 485  
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GERM 486 - What is German World Literature?


    What is German World Literature? This question highlights the relationship between the idea of a national literary tradition and a broader concept of literature that crosses linguistic, cultural, or national boundaries. This seminar focuses on theories of “world literature/s” and on primary literary texts written in German as examples of works that circulate through and reflect multiple cultural and linguistic contexts. How are the Grimm fairy tales mediated by Disney? What do we understand by the term “Kafkaesque”? Why did Goethe emulate the Persian poet Hafis? Do Senoçak’s readers in America contribute to a new idea of German or German-Turkish literature? Topics include the roles of translation, migration, economic and media globalization, nationalisms, and contemporary and historical transnational identities in shaping world literature written originally in German. Taught in German.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two GERM 300-level courses
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GERM 490 - Honors or High Honors


    Devoted to the honors project, this course must be taken in addition to the eight courses required for the major. Although it is a year-long course, students register for it once, in the spring semester of the senior year. See “Honors and High Honors,” on department page.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GERM 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Greek

  
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    GREK 121 - Elementary Classical Greek I


    The first semester of an introductory study of the elements of the Greek language. A thorough and methodical approach to the basics is supplemented, as students progress, by selected readings of works by ancient authors.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 122 - Elementary Classical Greek II


    The second semester of an introductory study of the elements of the Greek language. A thorough and methodical approach to the basics is supplemented, as students progress, by selected readings of works by ancient authors.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 121  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 195 - Elementary-Level Greek Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 201 - Intermediate Greek: Prose


    This intermediate-level course in the Greek language focuses on advanced grammar and syntax and on reading selections from a range of authors, e.g., Plato, Herodotus, Xenophon. Students increase their familiarity with Greek style while devoting attention to literary, historical, or philosophical analysis.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 122  or equivalent
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 202 - Intermediate Greek: Poetry


    An intermediate-level course in the Greek language with readings from one of the following poets: Sophocles, Homer, Euripides. Students increase their knowledge of Greek grammar and style and of the basic literary and technical aspects of Greek poetry.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites:     or equivalent
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 295 - Intermediate-Level Greek Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 301 - Greek Tragedy


    Close reading and study of one or more plays from the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, or Euripides. This course is designed to give students a wider appreciation of the genre of Greek tragedy as well as to increase their philological skills.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201  or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 302 - Aristophanes


    Studies at least one play of the Athenian comic poet Aristophanes. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between the comedies of Aristophanes and Athenian tragedy, the language of Aristophanic comedy, and the social and political background of his works.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201   or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 310 - Homer


    Close reading and study of selections from the Iliad or the Odyssey. Students, in addition to mastering the epic language, acquire a clearer sense of the place of the epics in Greek literary history.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201   or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 320 - Herodotus


    Close reading and study of selections from the Histories of Herodotus, the so-called father of history. This course introduces students to the study of Greek historiography and the nature of Herodotean history.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201   or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 321 - Thucydides


    Close reading and study of selections from the History of the Peloponnesian War of Thucydides, an astute political and historical analysis of the great conflict between Athens and Sparta that ended with the defeat of Athens. This course pays particular attention to the complex language of Thucydides and to his historiographical principles.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201   or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 350 - Plato


    Translation and close study of selected dialogues of Plato. This course focuses on the importance of Plato’s Greek and the dialogues’ structure to the philosophical arguments of each work.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: GREK 201  or higher
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 395 - Advanced-Level Greek Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 490 - Honors


    Independent study, open to candidates for honors.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    GREK 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Hebrew

  
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    HEBR 121 - Elementary Hebrew I


    Teach modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel and are designed for students who are interested in developing oral and written Hebrew skills. The course is helpful to those who are interested in deeper knowledge of Jewish culture and wish to improve their knowledge of Hebrew for religious studies. Designed for students with no previous Hebrew background and students who have learned to read phonetically without comprehension.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 122 - Elementary Hebrew II


    Teach modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel and are designed for students who are interested in developing oral and written Hebrew skills. The course is helpful to those who are interested in deeper knowledge of Jewish culture and wish to improve their knowledge of Hebrew for religious studies. Designed for students who have completed HEBR 121  or have equivalent knowledge.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HEBR 121 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 195 - Elementary-Level Hebrew Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 201 - Intermediate Hebrew I


    Continuing course for students who have completed HEBR 122  and for students with equivalent or advanced knowledge of modern Hebrew. These courses aim at enhancing the students’ reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking skills and involve extensive teaching of grammar. Instruction tools include audiovisual materials, popular texts, Israeli newspapers, and exercises in the language laboratory.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HEBR 122 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 202 - Intermediate Hebrew II


    Continuing course for students who have completed HEBR 201 and for students with equivalent or advanced knowledge of modern Hebrew. These courses aim at enhancing the students’ reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking skills and involve extensive teaching of grammar. Instruction tools include audiovisual materials, popular texts, Israeli newspapers, and exercises in the language laboratory.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HEBR 201 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 295 - Intermediate-Level Hebrew Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 395 - Advanced-Level Hebrew Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HEBR 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



History

Course classifications:

Africa (AF)
Asia (AS)
Europe (EU)
Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)
Middle East (ME)
Transregional (TR)
United States (US)

  
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    HIST 101 - The Growth of National States in Europe (EU)


    Examines national states after 1450; conflict in Europe and world-wide commercial and colonial ambitions; Renaissance culture, the Protestant revolt, Spanish ascendancy; 17th-century French absolutism and constitutional government in England; Austria, the weakened Germanies, the rise of Prussia and Russia; 18th-century liberalism; and the French Revolution, Napoleonic conquest, and the European settlement of 1815. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Restrictions: Not open to students with AP credit in European history.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 102 - Europe in Crisis Since 1815 (EU)


    Explores the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Europe over the last two centuries. Topics include the revolutions of 1848, nationalism and the unification of Italy and Germany, the Industrial Revolution and the growth of socialism, imperialism and the alliance system, the Russian Revolution and the two World Wars, Stalinism and the fall of the Soviet Empire after 1989, and the development of the European Union. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Restrictions: Not open to students with AP credit in European history.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 103 - American History to 1877 (US)


    A broad survey of key patterns, events, and the history of peoples in America from ca. 1500 to 1877. Covers the breadth of Native American life and the effects of European settlement, the colonial and constitutional periods through the age of reform, the crisis of union, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Prepares students for upper-level courses in early American history. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Restrictions: Not open to students with AP credit in U.S. history.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 104 - The United States since 1877 (US)


    A survey of United States history from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Topics include post-Reconstruction racial retrenchment in the South; immigration; the rise of industrialism and the response to it by farmers and workers; Populism and Progressivism; women’s suffrage and the modern women’s movement; the World Wars, the Cold War, Korea, and Vietnam; the New Deal and public policy; the cultural convulsions of the 1920s and 1960s; the victories and frustrations of the Civil Rights movement; and the post-Cold War period. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Restrictions: Not open to students with AP credit in U.S. history.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 105 - Introduction to the Modern Middle East (ME)


    This is a beginning course for study of the Middle East region, and a nuts-and-bolts primer on understanding the background for current events. Students learn the political, geographical, and social/ethnic borders that divide the region and the distribution of languages and faiths across it. The historical content of the course is a survey of the past two centuries, with emphasis on the 20th century. No prior knowledge of the Middle East is assumed. (ME)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior, No Junior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 259


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 106 - The Making of Modern Africa (AF)


    Surveys the history of Africa from 1880s to the contemporary period. Major themes will include: the imperial scramble and partition of Africa; African resistances; colonial rule in Africa; independence and problems of independence; socio-economic developments in independent Africa; ethnic conflicts; crises and contemporary issues. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 282  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior, No Junior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 282


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 110 - Introduction to Cultural History (TR)


    An introduction to the ways of looking at the past that differ substantially from those encountered in most high school history courses. Cultural history investigates the many different ways in which diverse peoples in the past have understood themselves, their societies, and their surroundings. It concerns itself with the lives of ordinary people, asking not only what they did, but how they thought about what they did. This course invites students to delve deeply into the cultural practices and ideas of past individuals through a series of case studies from widely disparate times and places. It introduces students to the methods of cultural history and to the historical discipline more generally through readings and analyses of primary sources alongside critical and synthetic approaches to important secondary literature. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 112 - The History of Technology (US)


    Examines the histories of technologies central to life in the last century. Investigating such technologies - office buildings, refrigerators, prisons, the internet, or drones - helps us better understand the politics, economics, and culture of the societies that adopt them. Their study allows us to explore major social processes like urbanization and the effects of major events like the war on terrorism, while thinking about how environment, race, class, gender, and sexuality shape modern life. People often talk about all the ways that technologies transform lives and communities-they sometimes claim that technology drives history. This course, in contrast, introduces students to the study of history and helps them discover the extent to which history actually drives technology. (US)

    Credits: 1.0
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 114 - History of Colgate (US)


    Introduces students to Colgate’s rich and diverse history as they learn to navigate the university archives; gain hands-on experience with primary sources; and learn the basics of researching and creating digital history. Students will also learn how historians document under-represented groups and wrestle with how best to commemorate both the happy and the controversial aspects of a university’s history. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 312


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 120 - Introduction to Museum Studies (TR)


    Introduces students to the rich interdisciplinary array of historical, theoretical, and practical topics that comprise this fast-growing field. Major themes include the history of museums from cabinets of curiosity to the Museum of Modern Art; the post-colonial critique of museums; and the practical aspects of museum management, education, and curating. (TR)

    Credits: 1.0
    Crosslisted: MUSE 120
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 199 - History Workshop


    Trains students in historical methods by focusing on research, writing, and communication skills. Students learn to understand historiographical debates, assemble and assess bibliographies, find and interpret primary sources, construct effective written arguments, cite sources correctly, and develop appropriate oral communication skills. Depending on the instructor, the course may also include the use of non-traditional sources such as film or material culture, as well as the interpretation of historic sites, monuments, and landscapes.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Intended for history majors; should be completed by the end of sophomore year.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 200 and HIST 299


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 202 - Europe in the Middle Ages, c. 300 - 1500 (EU)


    The Middle Ages were a period of enormous transformation and creativity in Europe. This course examines the emergence of medieval civilization from the ruins of the ancient world and the subsequent evolution of that civilization into modern Europe. Themes to be covered include the fall of Rome, the spread of Christianity and the conflicts within the medieval church, the rise and fall of Byzantium, the challenge of Islam and the crusades, the Vikings, the development of the medieval economy, the feudal revolution, the 12th-century Renaissance, the origins of law and government, the effects of the Black Death, and the Italian Renaissance. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 203 - Age of the American Revolution (US)


    Covers the age of the American Revolution, beginning with the Stamp Act Riots in 1765 and ending with the election of Andrew Jackson in 1828 and the success of white male suffrage. Topics include the pre-Revolutionary debates and turmoil, the war itself, popular post-war government, and the construction of the Constitution. From there students survey the first presidential elections, the building of a federal government, and the expansion of the United States to the Mississippi River. Includes debates over slavery, suffrage, Native Americans, and diplomatic history. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 209 - The Atlantic World, 1492 - 1800 (LAC)


    The events that followed Columbus’ accidental arrival in the New World in 1492 shaped the world in which we live today. This course explores the formation of the Atlantic communities as the result of interactions between European, African, and Native American peoples as well as the circulation of diseases, natural products, labor systems, imperial designs, economic policies, and frontier zones in the Atlantic world. Many of the consequences of this process of interaction were unintended. Students explore the configuration of European, African, and Native American societies before contact and the configuration of new communities in the New World; the slave trade and the establishment of the plantation complex from Brazil to South Carolina; the spread of Christianity in the New World; the development of scientific practices in the service of imperial and national states; the establishment of labor systems; and the different strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion of the different actors trying to find/protect their place in the Atlantic world. This course intends to provide a regional framework for the study of colonial societies in the western hemisphere as well as for the study of emerging empires and states in Europe. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 210 - The History of Health, Disease and Empire (TR)


    A comparative approach to exploring issues of disease, health, and medicine in the context of European imperial projects around the globe. Focusing on the late 17th through the early 20th centuries, the course traces how global empires facilitated environmental changes and exchanges, as well as the spread of diseases across distant sites. Students will study the shifting understanding of disease and health, as well as health disparities between enslaved and colonized populations and colonizers. These disparities had far-reaching geopolitical, economic, and social ramifications, including major influences on ideas of race and human difference. Students will gain an understanding of how practices of medicine and public health developed in imperial contexts as contested techniques of governance. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 211 - Women’s Rights in US History (US)


    Examines the social and cultural history of women in the United States from the Revolutionary era to the present day, tracing feminist ideas from the margins of democratic thought to the center of modern political discourse and culture. Students will explore how issues including race, class, region, religion, work, education, and generational differences have shaped women’s lives and maintained gendered order in American society and how, in turn, women have shaped their lives in response to these issues, opportunities, and constraints. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 311


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 212 - The Emergence of the Modern Woman (TR)


    A comparative and cross-cultural approach to modern women’s history, from the Enlightenment to the present. The course considers common elements of women’s experience in modern history, including changes in fertility and sexuality, increasing educational attainment, transformations in economic roles, and new access to political power. Students explore the importance of women’s own agency, or resistance to oppression, in bringing about and exploiting these changes; and they assess the diversity of women’s identities as conditioned, for example, by class, race, or ethnicity. The course emphasizes the particular history of different nations or regions depending on the instructor, but it always involves students learning to work within a comparative framework. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 213 - Women in the City (US)


    How has gender been negotiated in the confined space of the city? Focusing primarily on the rich histories of New York and Chicago, and other U.S. cities, this course considers how urban life for women and men diverged, and how it met, from the early 19th century, through the post-WWII “urban crisis” and women’s liberation movements, to the present day. Students will examine historical arguments about the construction of gendered identities, paying particular attention to divisions of race, class, sexuality, and religion. Throughout the course, students will interrogate their own personal geographies, as well as those inhabited by our historical subjects. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 215 - American Foreign Relations, 1776 - 1917 (US)


    Examines the development of American foreign relations from the Declaration of Independence to the entry of the United States into World War I. Considers the emergence of competing ideas about the place of the United States in the world in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and such subjects as the formation of early American foreign policy, tensions with Europe, westward expansion and the war with Mexico, the growth of American economic power, and the rise of U.S. imperialism. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 216 - U.S. Foreign Policy, 1917 - Present (US)


    U.S. foreign relations from the entry into the Great War to the present. Topics include the unquiet “normalcy” of the 1920s, origins of U.S. participation in the Second World War, the atomic bombs, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, arms control, the end of the Cold War, and the new world of terrorism and conflict. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 218 - The African American Struggle for Freedom and Democracy (US)


    Surveys the presence of African Americans in the United States and their struggle for freedom under the concept of democracy. Examines African origins, the Middle Passage, the creation of an African American culture in slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the growth of black communities in the face of hostility, the African American impact on American culture, the Civil Rights movement, and the continuing struggle by African Americans to make democracy real. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 219 - Oceanic Histories (TR)


    It may seem self-evident that oceans have histories, that far from being timeless, they constantly change. Nonetheless, this is a relatively recent idea. This course takes this idea as its starting point, and in doing so explores oceans and coastal areas as more than simply spaces, but as complex historical entities. Marine environmental history will provide the main framework for the course, although maritime history and oceanic studies concepts–such as Atlantic and Pacific Worlds–will also feature prominently. The course gives particular attention to the period of increasing globalization and drastically intensifying human exploitation of the oceans since roughly the fifteenth century. It also, however, considers pre-modern, pre-industrial relations between humans, oceans, and marine environments, suggesting their mutual influences long before the period usually associated with major human effects on the environment. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 220 - The History of Nature and Capital in the United States (US)


    Tells a story about Americans’ encounters with the natural world alongside their development of new technologies, modes of labor, and methods of business and finance. The wide-ranging explorations reveal the various ways that capitalism in the United States has packaged, developed, pillaged, improved, or sold the natural world—all while fundamentally shaping modern American business and society in the process. Students learn the fundamental methods of historical inquiry through in-depth investigation into the histories of particular commodities while they simultaneously wrestle with important questions in environmental studies and political economy. They ask the questions: what was the nature of power and what was the power of nature in the past? (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 224 - Introduction to Environmental History (TR)


    Explores reciprocal relationships between people and the environment over time. These relationships can be intimate and mundane (mowing a lawn, eating an avocado) or much grander in scale (testing nuclear weapons, creating a national park); they are also connected to global processes of colonialism and industrial development. Focusing on the modern period, students will investigate how a wide range of people around the globe-from indigenous peoples to plantation workers to suburban families-have used, transformed, and made sense of their environments over time. This history will also be considered for its relevance to contemporary environmental politics and activism.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 225 - Jamaica: From Colony to Independence (Study Group) (LAC)


    Surveys the history of Jamaica from 1655 when the British took possession of the island through political independence in 1962, to the present. Examines the growth of Jamaica to become Britain’s most prosperous colony during the 18th century based on an export sugar-based, slave-driven economy; the social and political consequences of its dependence on slavery; the economic effects of slave abolition and free trade during the 19th century; social and political developments after emancipation; the growth of black nationalism and decolonization; and post/neo-colonial developments. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 225  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 231 - Resistance and Revolt in Latin America (LAC)


    Examines a broad range of revolts and revolutionary movements in Latin America, beginning in the colonial period and focusing on the 20th century. Some of these successfully overthrew ruling regimes; others did not but left a lasting mark on the region’s history. Also examined are less organized forms of resistance, including sabotage, absenteeism, and riots used by slaves and workers to protest their conditions of life and labor. Case studies include Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, Colombia, and Guatemala. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 232 - The Crusades (EU)


    In 1099, a crusading army sacked Jerusalem, killing Muslims, Jews, and Christians alike. This act of savagery earned the crusade fame in Christian Europe and infamy in the Islamic world, prompting a crusade movement in the West and a military reaction in the East. The forces stirred up by these events also led Western Europe toward the conquest of Spain, Eastern Europe, Greece, and eventually the Americas and beyond. In this course, students study the causes, progress, and results of the Crusades themselves, as well as the new colonial societies that developed in their wake. Students focus on the transformation of four cultures: western Christendom, Judaism, Byzantium, and Islam. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 233 - The French Revolution: Old Regime, Revolution, and Napleonic Empire, 1770-1815 (EU)


    An overview of one of the most tumultuous periods in modern European history. France experienced a range of different governments, from absolute monarchy, to the Reign of Terror, to the Napoleonic Empire, a progression that was accompanied by an expansion of the existing war (from 1792 on) into a massive European-wide war. There were serious claims for citizenship and equality from working class men, from women of all classes, and from slaves and free people of color in France’s colonial empire; there were disturbing acts of violence committed by crowds as well as by the government itself. The course is designed to introduce students to the major events and personalities and the political evolution of the state during this time, as well as to discuss some of the important historiographical arguments. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 237 - Empires, Places, and Global History (TR)


    Empires controlled much of the world for much of recorded history. They did much to shape the modern world. Much of what we think about empires is based on Western European examples such as the Portuguese, Spanish, British, French, and Dutch empires of the fifteenth to eighteenth centuries. Students reconsider the formation, operation, and impact of early modern empires through a comparative look at Western European empires and powerful but often ignored East Asian empires. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 238 - Europe in the Age of the Renaissance and Reformation (EU)


    A survey of early modern European history. The primary areas of focus include the development of the European state system, the emergence of the European economy, and the growing size and scale of warfare. Additional subjects include the witch craze and gender roles, art and patronage, print culture and literacy, popular religions, and the development of the concepts of the self and individual freedom. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 241 - Life and Death in Early Modern Britain (EU)


    In 1485, Henry Tudor became king of England. A second-rate power in Europe, his kingdom had been torn apart by dynastic struggles and civil war. By 1714, when the last of the Stuart monarchs died, everything had changed. England was now part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, which included Scotland and Wales, and whose king also ruled over the neighboring island of Ireland. The medieval feudal kingship had been replaced by a well-established parliamentary monarchy, with many stops along the way. Britain was now a world power, at the center of a far-flung empire, and competing with France for dominance in Europe and beyond. This course will explore precisely how these monumental changes came about, taking a close look at British history over the long 16th and 17th centuries from a number of different perspectives: political, religious, social, cultural, commercial, and intellectual. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 243 - Native American History (US)


    Typically, American history is told from the perspective of European colonizers, with the story beginning on the east coast and expanding west across the continent. How does American history look different when we reverse this perspective and put the continent’s original people at the center of the story? What has been the experience of America’s Indigenous people, both before and after European contact? And why is this history essential for understanding the world we live in today? With these questions in mind, students will examine the history of indigenous peoples in what is now the United States from 1492 to the present day. Particular focus will be placed on Native Americans’ history of adaptation and resilience in the face of European and American colonialism. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: NAST 243
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 245 - Russia at War (EU)


    Examines five Russian wars fought between 1800 and the present: the Napoleonic wars, the Crimean War, World Wars One and Two, and the current conflict in Ukraine. Russia’s modern wars have been particularly (although certainly not uniquely) traumatic, with profound impacts on government and citizen alike. The course examines the ways in which the events leading up to war, wartime conditions, and eyewitness accounts were recorded and internalized by citizens and managed by an autocratic state to create collective historical understandings of events. By analyzing the changing ways in which social hierarchy, gender and exclusivity have been structured during and in the aftermath of war, the course offers an important guide to understanding the emergence of ethno-nationalism in one of the world’s largest and longest­lasting multi-ethnic Empires. (EU)

    Credits: 1
    Crosslisted: REST 245
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 248 - Women’s Lives in Europe, 1500-Present (EU)


    Focuses on the range of experiences of women in Europe, from the Renaissance to the present day. Topics include the experiences of women in the work force and the family, the witch craze, women and religion, women’s involvement in politics and reform movements, the exercise of state control over women’s bodies, and the changing priorities of feminism and feminist ideologies. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 249 - History of the City of London (Study Group) (EU)


    A history of the city from its origins in Roman times, through its medieval rebirth, its growth as the commercial and institutional capital of empire, to its refashioning as a vibrant, cosmopolitan metropolis. Taught through a combination of classroom sessions and walking tours. Offered only in London. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: London Study Group

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: HIST 349


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 251 - The Politics of History (TR)


    While the discipline of history is often approached as a collection of static, undisputed facts, the past is constantly re-interpreted and re-written to suit the needs of those living in the present. Far from being an apolitical exercise or a straightforward empirical investigation, history is contested and hijacked by individuals and groups who seek to use it to advance their interests and promote their agendas. History is not only subject to intense and divisive public debates, it frequently appears at the center of both latent and active inter-group conflicts. Through close readings of key texts and hands-on engagement with contemporary case studies, this course aims to provide an overview of the politics of history. The scope of the course is global, and the methodological approach is multi-disciplinary, spanning such fields as history, political science, public and international affairs, memory studies, museum studies, and peace and conflict studies. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 254 - History of Coffee and Cigarettes (TR)


    How did Arabian coffee and American tobacco become global vices? How has the use and meaning of these everyday products changed over time? Why are so many people drawn to caffeine and nicotine, and why do they have such a hard time quitting them? This course traces the history of coffee and cigarettes from the 1500s to the present. Readings and discussions range from 16th-century Turkish coffeehouses to 21st-century Starbucks, and from the prohibition by King James I of tobacco to contemporary debates on second-hand smoke. Other historical topics include the discovery and diffusion of coffee and tobacco; the establishment and spread of coffeehouses; early prohibitions on tobacco use; the connections between colonialism and consumer goods; and the medical, economic, and political debates surrounding these products in the 20th century. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 255 - The Ottoman Empire, 1300 - 1924 (TR)


    The Ottoman Empire lasted for over six centuries and was one of the last multi-ethnic empires in world history. States that were once part of the empire include Iraq, Israel, Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Libya, Greece, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. This course examines the social, political, and economic life of the Ottoman state from its beginnings among nomadic tribesmen to the fall of the “Grand Turk” in World War I. Issues addressed include the organization of structures of control over such a large and heterogeneous population and the maintenance of a relatively high level of integration in society over time. The factors that led to the disintegration of this empire, including nationalism and colonialism, are also examined. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 261 - Modern Irish History (EU)


    Few Western European countries have had as turbulent a recent history as Ireland, nor one whose legacy remains as persistent. This course focuses on Ireland’s evolution from Britain’s oldest colony to a self-governing state, culminating in her current situation as a divided nation whose acute internal tensions sit uneasily within a broader framework of European unity. Although the independence struggle and Anglo-Irish relations in general feature prominently, the course goes beyond the “national question” to examine such issues as the growth of Irish culture, images of Irishness at home and abroad, developments in social and economic history, and the complex roots of the conflict in Northern Ireland. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 263 - Cities of the Silk Road (TR)


    An overview of the cultural and economic relationships that developed across Eurasia from the 1st to the 14th centuries CE. The course focuses on the fabled “Silk Road,” overlapping of overland trade routes through Central Asia that connected China and Japan with western Europe. The impact of the Silk Road was as often regional and local as it was intercontinental; most travelers did not cover the whole route but remained in areas that were indigenous to them. The course examines a number of very broad themes, such as the interaction of nomadic and sedentary peoples, the spread of religions, cultural confrontation, and syncretism. The course is a challenging one for both instructor and students in that it covers an enormous geographic, cultural, and chronological span. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 264 - Modern East Asia (AS)


    Examines the formation of modern East Asia, with particular focus on China, Japan, and Korea. Explores the changing role of empire and nation, indigenous reevaluations of tradition, and finally the shifting political, economic, and military relations among China, Japan, and Korea. Concludes with a look at East Asia’s evolving place in the world as a whole. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    HIST 265 - War and Violence in East Asia (AS)


    Explores the place of war and violence in East Asian societies from 1200 to 1700. Among the many topics examined are samurai, ninja, martial arts, Ghenghis Khan, and piracy. First, students look at the internal organization of armies, their place in domestic politics and society, and their role in foreign relations. Second, they examine the impact of war on religion, economics, politics, and the arts. Third, because of its importance, violence was tightly linked to religion, literature, and popular theater. Finally, students consider the various ways that these traditions attempted to prevent, control, and manipulate violence through examining political philosophy, law codes, and social mores. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 266 - Foreign Relations in East Asian History (AS)


    Explores how a large portion of humanity, that is China, Korea, and Japan, understood, articulated, and practiced inter-state relations for most of their history (prior to 1800). Students examine the historical origins of foreign relations in East Asia, trace their variation by time and place, and consider their ties to domestic political, social, and intellectual developments. Finally, students review the strikingly different ways scholars have characterized East Asian foreign relations. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 269 - History of Modern India (AS)


    Surveys the history of South Asian from the expansion of the Mughal Empire in the early modern period and the rise of the British colonial power in the 18th and 19th centuries to the emergences of modern nation states. The course also looks at the different political, economic, and cultural trajectories that these nation states, particularly India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, have taken since independence. With the aim of developing a historical perspective to the complex and often paradoxical social, religious, and political identities that the region of South Asia exhibits today, this course introduces students to a diverse set of primary sources ranging from Mughal court chronicles, European travel accounts and autobiographies to public speeches and official correspondences. Although this course complements the survey of the ancient and medieval history of South Asia taught in HIST 268 , no prior background in South Asian history is required. (AS)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 271 - The First World War (TR)


    Was the First World War a “tragic and unnecessary conflict,” as one of its leading historians has recently suggested? Why did men continue to fight amid horror and misery? And how did total war rend the fabric of society, politics, and everyday life? To answer these and other questions, this course examines the First World War from a variety of perspectives. Attention will be paid to its origins and outbreak, its conduct by generals and common soldiers, its effect on women and workers, and its wide ranging consequences, both on individuals and empires. The course concludes with a discussion of how the First World War has shaped the world in which we live today. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 272 - War and Holocaust in Europe (EU)


    Focusing on one of the darkest chapters in European history, this course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of the Second World War and maps the terrible course of the Holocaust. Chronologically, the course begins with Hitler’s seizure of power and ends with the collapse of his empire in 1945; thematically, it gives special attention to collaboration and resistance, morale and mobilization, and military and diplomatic turning points. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the experience of ordinary men and women, whether on the home front or the battle front, in neutral or warring states, in hiding or in the camps. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 273 - The Century of Camps (TR)


    A little more than a hundred years ago, a new kind of structure appeared: the detention camp for civilians. Originally termed a ‘concentration camp’ (because it ‘concentrated’ the inhabitants of an area into a small confined space) and intended to be a short­term expedient, the camp quickly became an archetype of the modern age, a tool relied upon by democratic no less than dictatorial states-and even by humanitarian organizations seeking to deliver aid. This course will examine, from a comparative perspective, the role, structure and meaning of the camp in its extraordinary variety of forms during the past century; its creation of a ‘parallel universe’ within which new dystopian kinds of social organization become possible; and the human experience of those whose lives it has impacted, distorted or terminated. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Sophomores
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    HIST 281 - Slavery and the Slave Trade in Africa (AF)


    Slavery and the slave trade are global phenomena with historical roots in the earliest civilizations. The course examines the long history of slavery and the slave trade in African societies, exploring the role that slavery played in African economic, political, and social life, as well as how the export of human beings as slaves transformed African societies. The course also considers how slaveholders and slaves shaped early African societies, the logic and consequences of African participation in the Atlantic slave trade, the aftermath of abolition in 20th-century colonial Africa, and how coercive forms of labor control have persisted into the 21st century. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 281  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 284 - Decolonization in Africa (AF)


    Surveys the history of the growth of anti-colonial nationalism, the end of colonial rule, and post-independence Africa to the contemporary period. It focuses on the comparative analysis of the winning of independence from French, British, Italian, Portuguese, and Belgian colonization. Major themes include African responses to colonial rule, wind of change, independence and problems of independence, pan-African movement, socio-economic developments, cold war, colonial legacies, political systems, and contemporary issues. (AF)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 284  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    HIST 300 - The London Colloquium (EU)


    Taught each fall semester. Limited to students accepted to the London History Study Group the following spring. Has three purposes: first, to introduce students to subject matter to be covered in the instructor’s London seminar; second, to get students started on the London-based seminar projects, to be researched and finished under the auspices of HIST 491 in London; and third, to prepare students for life and work in London through study of the city’s history and culture. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    HIST 302 - Global Toxic History (TR)


    Focuses on the themes of contamination, waste, and toxic exposure in the modern world, with the goal of understanding environmental health issues in historical context. What political, economic, and social forces have contributed to the prevalence of contamination? Why have some communities suffered disproportionately? How have people in the past identified and coped with toxic danger, and how have they fought against the contamination of their regions, cities, homes, and bodies? In the face of mounting global challenges of toxicity and contamination today, students consider what lessons might be found in these past struggles. (TR)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 304 - Sex and Sexualities in U.S. History (US)


    Explores the complex and often hidden histories of sex and sexuality in U.S. history, from the Revolutionary era to the present day. Students will consider how American views of sex, desire, and other intimate matters have changed over time, influencing both private decisions and public policies. Topics to be examined include: the emergence of hetero- and homosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the contested boundaries drawn between sociability, friendship, and romance; experiences of dating and courtship; representations of sex and sexualities in popular culture; the development of women’s lib and LGBTQ politics; and the significance of gender, class, racial/ethnic, and generational differences. Students will read broadly in the field to understand the kinds of questions historians are pursuing in this growing area of study. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 305 - Asian American History (US)


    This course offers an in-depth survey of the history of people of Asian descent from the first arrivals of significant numbers of Asians in American in the mid-19th century to the present, with heavier emphasis on the post-1965 era. In that year, the Hart-Cellar Act lifted earlier restrictions on Asian immigration and initiated substantial migration from the East. The course covers significant events and people in Asian American history while examining the course of ordinary individuals through demography, law, family, and cultural history. This history enables students to learn about and analyze issues of tradition/modernity; race, acculturation, and identity politics; culture and the intersection of laws and politics; and multiculturalism. While coverage extends to every Asian nationality present in the United States, emphasis is placed on the largest groups including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Filipinos. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 306 - History of Numbers in America (US)


    Students in this course explore American history by asking how numbers have come to play such a powerful role in shaping American lives. Case studies present the histories of some of American society’s most important numbers, including IQ and SAT scores, credit ratings and stock indices, BMI and the calorie, census data and the consumer price index. Students learn the methods of cultural and intellectual history. They develop new conceptual tools for understanding US history, as well as the history of science, business, and the modern state. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 309 - Culture and Society in Cold War America (US)


    For more than 40 years, the Cold War cast a long shadow over American culture and society, shaping everything from gender roles to religious practice, from funding for science to the struggle for civil rights. This course explores the impact of the Cold War on the American home front. Topics include American reactions to the atomic bomb, the role of civil defense, McCarthyism, the culture of consumption, and the impact of the Cold War on the family, politics, religion, science, and popular culture. Finally, the course considers the domestic legacy of the early Cold War, asking to what degree it retarded or set the stage for the social movements of the 1960s. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 313 - Upstate History (US)


    Examines the rich political, social, and cultural history of upstate New York, with a focus on central New York in the 19th century. As the 18th century came to a close, upstate was a borderland between European settlers and Native Americans. In the antebellum era, the region became a center of the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements—and an economic powerhouse where canals and railroads encouraged agricultural prosperity, industrialization, and tourism. Before the Civil War, utopian communities, religious experimentation, and new institutional forms flourished; remnants of many of these movements and markets can still be found on the landscape today. Students will complete regular public history labs - conversations and activities with practitioners from around the state engaging the fields of museum studies and public history. In the process, students will examine the theoretical and methodological challenges surrounding the preservation and presentation of local history in museums, historic sites, and public projects. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: HIST 199  or HIST 299
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 316 - The United States in Vietnam, 1945 - 1975 (US)


    The origins, progress, and consequences of the U.S. war in Vietnam. The course opens with a chronological overview of the war and U.S. decision making, then examines several key interpretations of American intervention, explores special topics on the war (including antiwar protest and the war as an international event), and concludes with a look at the legacy of the war. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 318 - African American History: African Background to Emancipation (US)


    This is a course in the history of African American people from 1619 to 1865. The emphasis is on the transition from Africa to the New World, the slavery experience, and the transition from slavery to freedom. The ideology of racism, the formation of racial identity within the diaspora, and the importance of African American culture are also studied. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 319 - African American Leadership and Social Movements (US)


    This is a research-oriented course that examines the history of African American leadership and those social movements that have impacted the black world and the United States in the late 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Topics include Reconstruction, the movement to build black communities, the civil rights/black power movements, and the continuing struggle to achieve social justice in the 21st century. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 320 - New York City History (US)


    This survey of key patterns of development of New York’s society, economy, and culture from colonial through recent history includes contact and syncretistic cultures of Iroquois, Dutch, German, English, and Afro-Americans; impact of New York’s post-revolutionary growth; establishment of metropolitan culture and politics; social and political ramifications of New York’s transport and trade; rise of ethnic democracy in 19th and 20th centuries; New York’s place in national perspective; perspectives for the future. (US)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 322 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (LAC)


    Examines the history of racial and ethnic difference in Latin America, focusing on how racial and ethnic labels were bestowed, claimed, and disputed; what these implied for personal and collective identity; and how other social hierarchies (such as class and gender) operated alongside race and ethnicity in determining status. Attention is also paid to how ideas of race and ethnicity changed over time, especially in moments of economic or political crisis, and how these ideas were taken up by different social groups and in pursuit of various agendas (revolutionary, nationalistic, modernizing, etc.). Spans the colonial period to the present, with case studies from Mexico, Brazil, the Caribbean, and the Andes. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 326 - Jamaican Culture (Study Group) (LAC)


    Examines the historical growth and fluorescence of Jamaican culture from the English conquest to the present. This culture is drawn from indigenous Taino, European, African, Jewish, Lebanese, Indian, and Chinese heritages, leading to the emergence of a unique Jamaican creole culture. The process of creolization over historical time forms the central and uniting theme of the course. In that context, various aspects of Jamaica’s culture as well as the social forces that helped to shape it are explored. The examination of Jamaican culture includes religion and belief systems; marriage and family; art, music, and dance; literature; folkways; festivals; language; material cultures (food, dress, architecture, etc.); and sport. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ALST 326
    When Offered: West Indies Study Group

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 332 - Medieval England (EU)


    Topics in the history of England between the years 600 and 1500. The focus may in a particular semester be the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, the Norman Conquest and the origins of English law, or Revolutions and Piety in the later Middle Ages.(EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 333 - The Medieval Church (EU)


    Studies the development of the theology, institutions, and practice of Christianity in the medieval West. Topics to be covered include the early Church; the rise of the papacy and monasticism; the relationship of Catholicism with Jews, Muslims, and Orthodox Christians; the challenge of heresy; the Investiture Conflict; and the shaping of doctrine and practice. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: Global Engagements


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    HIST 334 - France in Modern Times (EU)


    Modern France, from the fall of Napoleon to the contentious present, has a history of political upheaval against a backdrop of often surprising economic and social stability. Students will look at the revolutions of the 19th century (1830, 1848, and Paris Commune of 1871); the Dreyfus Affair; the trauma of World War I; defeat and occupation in World War II; the Vietnam and Algerian decolonization wars; the student revolts of 1968; and the challenges of the 21st century. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 336 - The History of Bodies, Planets, and Plants in the Early Modern Period (EU)


    Provides a survey of Western thought about the natural world from the work of ancient philosophers to the work of Isaac Newton. Topics covered include the differences between science and natural philosophy; the role of Plato and Aristotle in the development of Western European natural philosophy; intersections between natural philosophy and technology in ancient Rome and medieval Europe; the growth of the university as a center of natural philosophical study; the role of Atlantic explorations in the development of science; the new cosmologies of the early modern period; and the growth of science, scientific culture, and experimental method. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 337 - Pirates in the Atlantic World, 1500s - 1730 (LAC)


    Examines the emergence of piracy and pirates in the Atlantic World. During the early modern period (15th to 18th centuries), violence and robbery at sea became very intense, giving rise to famous figures. In the second half of the 17th century, pirates established a permanent presence in the Caribbean Sea, and their activities in the area are associated with the first Golden Age of Piracy. A second Golden Age dates from 1713 (Treaty of Utrecht) to the 1730s. The British Navy led an intense campaign against piracy in the 18th century and eventually removed pirates from the Caribbean Sea. Students explore the role pirates played in the development of Atlantic empires, colonial American societies, the transatlantic slave trade, and the Atlantic commercial system from the 16th to the 18th centuries, as well as international legal issues and gender issues. (LAC)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    HIST 338 - The Age of Absolutism in Europe (EU)


    Covers the development of political absolutism in Europe, with a special focus on France from 1589 to 1774. The construction of absolutism in France began with the first Bourbon monarch, Henri IV, reached its high point under the Sun King, Louis XIV, and began its decline under XV, whose many failures led the way to the French Revolution in 1789. Topics include the intellectual and religious justification for absolutism; the political and cultural role of Versailles and courtly etiquette; the crushing of the power of the nobility; wars, the economy, and the rise of the modern army; and the Enlightenment. (EU)

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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