2018-2019 University Catalogue 
    
    Feb 17, 2020  
2018-2019 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Sociology

  
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    SOCI 344 - The Sociology of Money and Markets


    Examines the social, cultural, and political underpinnings of economic constructs such as money, the market, consumption, and finance. Students explore how a sociological perspective complements and challenges traditional economic theories. The focus is on the economics of everyday life - consumption, saving, and investing.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 348 - American Popular Culture


    Popular culture is an important site for the expression of cultural identity and cultural conflict in America. This course views popular culture as embedded in the cultural politics of American society that involves the formation of ideas, identities, pleasures, and even desires. Theoretical texts are read that place popular culture and mass media in their social, economic, and political contexts. From conflicts over high art and popular art, to leisure and social class, to race and ethnicity, to film and the spectacle, to gender and sexuality, to the postmodern, this course explores the rich history of American popular culture over the last 150 years.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) or (FMST 200 )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Sociology & Anthropology, Sociology, Film & Media Studies Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: SOAN 348


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    SOCI 350 - The Social World of the Oceans: Ships, Sailors, Ports, Trade, and Environmental Crisis


    The course seeks to examine the life of the shipping industry, seafarers, and port cities, all crucial to our social understanding of a world where most global trade still moves in ships, and where there are strong signs of renewed naval competition. The course starts by looking at the rise and fall of British maritime dominance. It then focuses on the “container revolution,” the rise of the supertanker, and the current economics of shipping. There is strong attention to the maritime labor, the cultures of sailors, and the nature of port cities. The continuing importance of naval power and resurgent piracy are examined. Finally, the course addresses the current ecological catastrophe in the oceans.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 355 - Culture, Class, Politics: Social Theory


    The course charts the development of social theory since the classical social theorists, with a particular focus on how critical social thinkers have understood inequality and forms of social power. The course gives special attention to the relationship between social thought and its historical-political context, and notably its relationship to labor and anti-colonial movements and the “new social movements.” Central themes in the course include the problems of the idea of “culture”; how much an understanding of “class” can or cannot explain; and the status of notions of ideology, discourse, and materialism in contemporary social thought. Theorists who work may be covered include Gramsci, Norbert Elias, Karl Polanyi, C. Wright Mills, De Beauvoir, Fanon, Said, Bourdieu, Habermas, Stuart Hall, Anthony Giddens, and others.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or ANTH 350 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 361 - Power, Politics, and Social Change


    Examines the relationship between power, politics, and social change with a special focus on social movements. It considers questions such as: What leads to social movement? What do social movements do? What are the tools they use? The approach of this course is historical and comparative. It will consider what social movements can tell us about society, and apply key sociological concepts to considerations of collective action. The course will consider the building blocks of social movements from the perspective of a social movement participant, exercising the notion of ‘sociological competence.’ By studying social movements through the perspectives of both scholar and activist, students will gain helpful tools for collective action and social change.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 367 - Sociology of Gender


    Drawing on theoretical and empirical research, as well as visual media and print news reporting, this course explores gender as a primary market of social inequality in our society and a major impetus for social change. Specifically, students analyze how gendered ideologies, practices, and contexts shape social institutions such as work, family, medicine, sport, military, religion, and the beauty industry. They examine how institutions and bodies become contested sites for gender and sexual politics. The class also pays close attention to how gendered ideologies work in tandem with race, class, and sexual expectations, constraining (and sometimes enabling) bodies and lives. The course encourages students to analyze US culture with a gendered lens.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) or (WMST 202 )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 369 - Women, Health, and Medicine


    Draws on interdisciplinary research and writings to explore the ways in which the nature, distribution, meanings, and everyday life experiences associated with health, medicine, and illness are shaped by historical, cultural, political, and economic factors. Covering both micro- and macro-sociological terrains, students utilize a gendered lens to critically analyze the construction of gendered medical problems and doctor-patient encounters throughout history, women’s experiences in a male-dominated health care system, and social movements in response to medical injustices.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: SOCI 201  or SOAN 204 or SOCI 250  or SOAN 210
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 375 - Media and Politics


    Uses a social scientific approach to examine the role that the media plays in American politics. Key areas of inquiry include the function of the media in democracy, the news-making process, campaigning through the news, political advertising, media effects, governing through the news, and infotainment/satire.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: FMST 375  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) or (FMST 200 )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Sociology & Anthropology, Sociology, Film & Media Studies Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 378 - Social Theory of Everyday Life


    Since classical times, philosophers and historians have studied and recorded the details of everyday life with an eye to grasping the meaning of social practice. The past 50 years, however, have seen the bourgeoning of an exciting body of critical theory on the quotidian. Much of this work is concerned with profound questions about how the systems, structures, and practices of modernity shape basic human interactions with things, with places, and with other persons, and how these, in turn, reproduce social structures. This course presents sociological and anthropological texts concerned with everyday domesticity, cuisine, gesture, movement, activity, entertainment, talk, schooling, and bureaucracy, and explores the theoretical paradigms of knowledge, practice, and power to which these texts are ultimately addressed.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ANTH 378 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) or (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SOCI 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SOCI 453 - Senior Seminar in Sociology


    In this capstone seminar for the sociology major, students conduct original sociological research on the topics of their choice. Research projects grounded in sociological theory, review relevant literature on the topics, and collect and analyze data to find their own results. Each student’s project results in a significant thesis paper, through which students learn the process of doing sociological research and writing a sociological article. Seminars focus on a variety of broad topical areas in sociology, depending on the instructor.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 101  or SOAN 101) and (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) and (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) and (SOCI 251  or SOCI 253  or SOCI 254  or ANTH 211 ) (SOCI 101  with a grade of C or higher)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Recommended: All Sociology majors should plan to take this course in the fall of their senior year.
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 454 - Senior Seminar in Sociology and Anthropology


    This is the capstone course for students taking the joint emphasis in the sociology and anthropology concentration. Students design original research projects grounded in recent social theory and a review of relevant literatures on their topics; they collect and analyze data related to the topics, and each student produces a significant original thesis. Seminars also examine select theoretical issues in contemporary sociology and anthropology, with the specific focus depending on the instructor. The joint seminar may also be taken by students pursuing the sociology or anthropology emphasis.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 101  or SOAN 101) or (SOAN 102 or ANTH 102 ) and (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) and (ANTH 211  or SOAN 211) and (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) (SOCI 201  and ANTH 102  must have a grade of C or higher)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Sociology & Anthropology Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 494 - Honors and High Honors Seminar


    Serves as a bridge to the Honors Thesis Workshop. Students develop a proposal and collect initial data for a substantive, research-based thesis project, to be completed in  .

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (SOCI 101  or SOAN 101) and (SOCI 201  or SOAN 204) and (SOCI 250  or SOAN 210) and (SOCI 251  or SOCI 253  or SOCI 254  or ANTH 211 ) (SOCI 101  with a grade of C or higher)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SOCI 495 - Honors and High Honors Thesis Workshop


    With the guidance of their instructor from SOCI 494  and a topical adviser from among the continuing faculty in sociology, students work to complete the projects begun in SOCI 494 .

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: SOCI 494  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: Only Senior
    Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to seniors who have completed SOCI 494  
    Area of Inquiry: Social Relations,Inst.& Agents
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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Spanish

  
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    SPAN 121 - Elementary Spanish I


    The SPAN 121,122 sequence invites students to an introductory-level communication with the Spanish-speaking world. In SPAN 121, students become familiar with the mechanics of the spoken and written language while sharing information about themselves and their surroundings. Exercises and projects focus on learning about people, cities and music in Latin American and Spain through basic language structures. Students are strongly encouraged to continue into SPAN 122 to complete the year-long sequence. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 122 - Elementary Spanish II


    SPAN 122 builds upon the skills acquired in SPAN 121 by enhancing mastery of the language through the use of short stories, video and audio exercises, and the exploration of other forms of cultural production in the Spanish-speaking world. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 195 - Elementary-Level Spanish Language Abroad


    Elementary-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish


    Designed to improve the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish. It includes a comprehensive review of grammar, regularly scheduled vocabulary study, conversational practice, short compositions, and laboratory exercises. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Two or three years of high school Spanish or SPAN 121 , SPAN 122  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Recommended: Students with more than 3 years of high school Spanish should not register for this course Students with a grade of D+ or below in SPAN 122  are urged to repeat the course before taking SPAN 201.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish: Language and Literature


    Continues to improve the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish and emphasizes development of reading comprehension. It includes a review of the more difficult points of intermediate grammar and focuses on the acquisition of skills necessary for the study of literature. Vocabulary study, conversational practice, and short compositions based on readings are included. Instructors will determine eligibility of students with more than 3 or 4 years of secondary school Spanish following review of language background. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: Three to four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 201  or equivalent
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Not open to students who receive credit for SPAN 202 by scoring 4 on the AP language exam or 4 on the AP literature exam. Students with more than four years of secondary school Spanish may not register for this course and should select a 300-level course instead.
    Recommended: Recommended for students who have a good background in grammar but need further training in reading before taking courses at the 350 level.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 225 - Modern Latin American Literature in Translation


    A close study of major modern and contemporary Latin American authors. The literary works are studied in their socio-cultural contexts. Taught in English.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 226 - Latin American Women Writers


    This course is a close study of the literature written by women in modern-contemporary Latin America. Representative authors are studied within the general framework of their socio-literary contexts. Taught in English.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 295 - Intermediate-Level Spanish Language Abroad


    Intermediate-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 351 - Spanish Literature: Knights and Troubadours in Medieval Spain


    Offers an introduction to Spanish literature from its medieval origins through the 15th century, with emphasis on the relations among literature, culture, and civilization. Works from different genres are studied, including epic poetry, Hispano-Arabic poetry, folk ballads, early theater, historical works, and short stories. Students explore issues of authorship, as well as the cultural, religious, and historical contexts that produced each work. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 352 - Spanish Literature: Love and Honor in the Golden Age


    This survey examines the interrelated notions of love, sex, and honor as they appear in the prose, theater, and poetry of Spain. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the Baroque, the so-called Golden Age of Spanish literature (16th and 17th centuries). Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 353 - Spanish Literature: Modern Spain in Crisis


    Beginning with the loss of the empire in the 19th century and moving through a series of political upheavals, including civil war and fascism, the history of modern Spain has been one of turmoil and continual conflict. The numerous political crises resulted in larger crises of a social, spiritual, and moral nature. Questions of national identity, generational gaps, and gender, as they appear in Spanish literature from the late 19th century to the present day, are the focus of this course. Readings include works of prose, theater, and poetry drawn from a range of literary movements, and emphasis is placed on the socio-historical context and its relationship with literary innovation. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 354 - Latin American Literature: Illusion, Fantasy, Magical Realism


    Through a survey of Latin American literature from its origins through the 20th century, this course examines the many forms of alternative reality that Latin American writers have created and explored. The course relates those realities to the cultural and sociological history of Latin America as well as to larger Western literary modes, such as the Baroque, Romanticism, and Surrealism. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 355 - Latin American Literature: The Many Voices of Latin America


    The course explores the diversity of literary voices in Latin America, from pre-Columbian texts to the contemporary writings of Castellanos, Rulfo, and García Márquez. This survey introduces students to the most important developments in Latin American literary history as it examines questions of cultural, ethnic, gender, and class identities. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for this course.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 361 - Advanced Composition and Stylistics


    Structured as an intensive composition class. Emphasis is placed on mastering the fine points of Spanish grammar in order to improve writing skills. In addition to regular class meetings, students are required to attend a series of cultural events, which may include film, theater, etc. Language Placement Guidelines

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: At least four years of high school Spanish, or SPAN 202  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Restrictions: Not open to students with a score of 5 on AP language exam, except by permission of instructor. Must be taken on campus to fulfill major or minor requirements.
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 380 - Perfecting Language (Madrid Study Group)


    Provides students with a comprehensive review of the finer points of the Spanish language, with an emphasis on fostering near-native pronunciation, correctness of grammar in speech and writing, and the idiomatic use of the language in a variety of contexts. Placement in this course is determined by the Director in consultation with the Santiago de Compostela faculty following the two-week introductory session there.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 395 - Advanced-Level Spanish Language Abroad


    Advanced-level language courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, an approved program, or in a foreign institution of higher learning.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 400 - Special Topics (Madrid Study Group)


    This class, which includes an advanced study of the arts in modern Spain, is offered each fall as part of the Madrid Study Group, and counts for the Spanish major and minor.

    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 460 - Spanish Renaissance and Baroque Poetry


    This seminar studies Spanish poetry of the 16th and 17th centuries. Particular attention is paid to three currents: the Petrarchan tradition of love poetry, Neo-stoic moral poetry, and the burlesque. Emphasis is placed on the works of Garcilaso, Fray Luis de León, Góngora, Lope de Vega, and Quevedo.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 461 - Theater of the Golden Age


    This seminar studies the techniques and themes of the comedia as exemplified primarily in the works of Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, and Tirso de Molina.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 462 - Cervantes’ Don Quijote


    An introduction to Cervantes’ masterpiece, based on an analytical study supported by critical bibliography.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 465 - 19th-Century Spanish Literature


    First explores the historical and literary circumstances surrounding the rise of realism in 19th-century Spain, paying particular attention to aspects of the tradition that are peculiar to the Spanish tradition. Representative works from the height of Spanish realism are examined, and the course ends with the study of texts from the last decades of the century that sought to transcend the limitations inherent in the realist movement.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
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    SPAN 466 - Colonial Latin American Literature


    Studies selections from the major genres of the colonial period through the end of the 17th century: the chronicles of the discovery and conquest, lyric and epic poetry, and colonial theater. Pays particular attention to the diverse literary representations of the encounter between Spanish and indigenous cultures, and to the writings of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 467 - Latin American Romanticism


    Examines the rise of Romantic modes of expression in 19th-century Latin American letters. Works are studied in the context of the continent’s struggle for political and cultural independence, anti-slavery sentiment, political dissent and the experience of exile, and the project of nation building.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    SPAN 468 - Visions and Re-visions of the Spanish Conquest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective


    Combines historical and literary approaches to examine early representations and interpretations of the Spanish discovery and conquest of the Caribbean and Mexico. The first half of the course compares texts produced by indigenous and Spanish actors during the Conquest period. The analysis of letters, chronicles, treatises, codices and other documents offers insight on the diverse Spanish and Native understandings of the events and ways of portraying them, and on the fierce legal and moral debates that the Conquest engendered among Spaniards. The second half of the course focuses on retrospective representations of the Conquest during the established colonial regime. The analysis of plays, poetry, works of art, and other texts of the 16th and 17th centuries reveals how the Conquest and its aftermath were reimagined by Spanish and Creole subjects, enabling them to articulate new forms of power, authority and hybrid identity.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    SPAN 472 - From the Generation of ‘98 to the Contemporary Period


    From the turn of the century until the Spanish Civil War, Spanish literature enjoyed an artistic explosion the likes of which had not been seen since the Golden Age. A profusion of literary movements - including the Generation of ‘98, modernism, and the avant-garde - reflected the creative vibrancy of the nation even as it slipped into political and social chaos. This course analyzes the novels of this period, both in terms of literary innovation and their relationship to ideological trends and social reality in early 20th-century Spain.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    SPAN 473 - The Spanish Contemporary Novel: From Censorship to Democracy


    In post-Civil War Spain, the prolonged tenure of Franco led to almost 40 years of strict censorship on the part of the government. The death of Franco in 1975 brought a cultural regeneration to the country, which was renowned for its literary innovation and fresh relationship to a new sociocultural context. This course analyzes themes of oppression and social injustice in the literary works of post-war novelists, as well as the novelistic representations of changes undergone by Spain during the transition to democracy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    SPAN 475 - Spanish as a Global Language


    Explores the historical, social, and cultural elements represented in the dialectical diversity of the Spanish language. Some of the issues studied are the development of Spanish as the national language of Spain; the contemporary status of regional languages and dialects within Spain; the spread of Spanish in the Americas, Africa, and Asia through conquest and colonization; language policies toward indigenous languages in Latin America; and the future of the role of Spanish as a minority language in the United States. Emphasis is put on the role of language in cultural and social identity as well as in political power and conflict. Taught in Spanish.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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  •  

    SPAN 476 - Linguistic History of Spain


    This seminar provides advanced-level language students with the understanding of the evolution of the Spanish language. It focuses on the external history (i.e., cultural, social, historical, and political factors that contributed to the evolution of Spanish from Latin to early romance, and then to the modern language), as well as the internal linguistic changes (i.e., changes in sounds, word formation, sentence structure, and vocabulary). These external and internal developments are considered within the context of linguistic diversity of pre-modern Iberia. Special attention is paid to historical explanations of “irregularities” found in modern Spanish. Therefore, the course is of interest to students who wish to improve their understanding of the idiosyncrasies of the Spanish language. The class also linguistically analyzes a selection from pre-modern texts. This analysis is of particular interest to students who plan to take courses in medieval, Golden Age, and colonial Spanish literature. The course does not presuppose knowledge of linguistics or languages other than Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 477 - Women Writing in Latin America


    An in-depth study of the relationship between gender and genre in literary texts written by women in contemporary Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean, the course addresses questions of authorship within the development of Latin American women’s literary traditions, as well as the relationship between patriarchal societies and women’s literary discourses.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 478 - Literature of the Caribbean


    A close study of the Hispanic literature of the island nations of the Caribbean, with particular attention to ethnic and cultural diversity. Representative authors in the various genres are studied within the general framework of their social and literary contexts. Emphasis is placed on contemporary writers.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 479 - Contemporary Latin American Literature


    Offers critical study of selected contemporary Latin American texts in the light of current modes of writing and interpretation. Delineates the major patterns of formal and thematic development within the literary history of Latin American letters, but emphasizes the analysis of structural and linguistic problems posed by the texts.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 480 - Major Hispanic Authors (Study Group)


    This seminar provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the Spanish language. It is taught by a staff member who has particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: On an irregular basis

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 481 - Major Hispanic Authors


    This seminar provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the Spanish language before 1900. It is taught by a staff member who has particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: On an irregular basis

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 482 - Major Hispanic Authors


    This seminar provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the Spanish language after 1900. It is taught by a staff member who has particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: On an irregular basis

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 483 - Spanish American Modernismo: Spleen, Femme Fatales, Artificial Paradises


    Analyzes literary works from the Spanish American Modernista period (1880-1910). The critical analysis of poems, chronicles, short stories and novels will be situated within the broader context of modernity, and within relevant social, cultural and political contexts in Latin America during the transition from the 19th to the 20th century.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 484 - Hispanic Writers and the Spanish Civil War


    An in-depth study of a wide range of literary texts (including poems, short stories, chronicles, and memoirs) by significant Hispanic writers that demonstrate these authors’ literary and political engagement with the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). Other forms of cultural production (such as films, paintings, political speeches, and propaganda posters) will also be analyzed in an exploration of the close connection between literary practice and political commitment in times of war.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 485 - Latin American Novels Before the Boom (1910-1950)


    Undertakes an in-depth study of selected novels written before the Latin American Boom of the 1960s. These highly experimental texts, covering a wide range of geographical regions, will be situated within relevant cultural and socio-political contexts, which include topics related—but not limited to—technology and mass media, urbanization and public spaces, working-class movements, and critiques of Hollywood’s culture industry.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 490 - Honors


    Students pursuing honors in Spanish enroll in this course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    SPAN 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term



Theater

  
  •  

    THEA 211 - Tragedy & Tragic Vision


    An introduction to literary study that focuses on readings in western drama, chosen primarily from authors writing in the period from classical antiquity through the Renaissance, and explores theories, definitions, and the performance of tragedy.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 211  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 232 - London Theater Study Group: Campus Prep


    This 0.25-credit course designed to prepare students for the London Theater Study Group experience. The course will meet for a total of ten hours, during the semester before the group is scheduled to commence. The class will engage in series of framework readings, and a live theater performance in order to prime and prepare students for the coursework abroad.

    Credits: 0.25
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 240 - Intro to Hip Hop Dance


    An introduction to the fundamental movement techniques and concepts of hip hop dance. Work will focus on the mechanics of rhythm, popping, waving, and choreography. It will include attending live dance concerts, written assignments, readings, and choreography projects. In addition to physical practice, hip hop will be studied as an embodied cultural form with particular attention given to histories and issues of race, gender, and class.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 246 - Introduction to Performance Studies


    What is performance? The verb “to perform” can be variously defined as “to carry out an action,” “to discharge a duty,” “to accomplish a task,” and “to present to an audience.” Interdisciplinary in nature, students explores performance in the context of the performing and media arts, as well as in the context of ritual, politics, and everyday life. Emphasizes the relationship between performance and race, gender, sexuality, and other vectors of identity: how are various types of difference enacted, articulated, and represented through performative acts?

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: FMST 246
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 250 - Stagecraft


    An introduction to the “behind the scenes” disciplines that are required to successfully mount a theatrical production. Subjects will include set construction and painting, theatrical lighting, sound, stage management, rigging, and special effects, all with a strong commitment to workplace health and safe work habits. Students are involved with the construction of the University Theater production and with the general operation of a working theater. Course requirements include 20 lab hours. This course is open to all students, with theater majors and minors given priority.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 252 - Scenic Design


    A hands-on introduction to the aesthetics and practice of set design. The course examines the relationship between play and text analysis, concept, and production. It explores the set designer’s responsibility as artist and collaborator. Historical and visual research and the step-by-step development and realization of individual design concepts are introduced. Basic technical skills, such as perspective drawing, drafting to scale and model building, are taught with the goal of expressing the students’ imaginations in a full and articulate manner.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 252


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 253 - Costume Design


    An introduction to the aesthetics and practice of costume design. The course examines the relationship between play and text analysis, concept, and production. It explores the costume designer’s responsibilities as artist and collaborator. Historical and visual research and the step-by-step development and realization of individual design concepts are introduced with the goal of expressing the students’ imaginations. Basic drawing and painting skills are taught and applied. A corresponding lab in the costume shop offers practical experience in basic costume construction techniques: patterning, draping, cutting and sewing.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 253


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 254 - Basic Acting


    An introduction to acting as art, discipline and craft. This course provides a practical and theoretical introduction to the basic skills of acting. No prior acting experience is required. The course consists of individual and ensemble exercises to develop physical awareness, concentration, and imagination. The course is aimed at enhancing self-confidence, expressiveness, and creativity. Acting teaches poise and presence, vocal and physical coordination. Through corporeal exercises, improvisations, play analysis, and scene work students acquire a working vocabulary in the fundamentals of acting. The course culminates with in-class performance work.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 254


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 257 - Workshop in Children’s Theater


    An introduction to performance through the creation of a play for young audiences. In this intensive workshop students explore all aspects of theater-making, familiarizing them with the building blocks of theater production. The course culminates in public performance and involves a service-learning component, which may include community-based projects and touring.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: THEA 257L 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 257L - Children’s Theater Lab


    Required corequisite to THEA 257.

    Credits: 0.00
    Corequisite: THEA 257 
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 259 - Performance I


    Credit for performance in a University Theater production. May be repeated up to three times for credit. The University Theater production is an opportunity offered to students to be involved in a production directed either by a Colgate faculty member or by an artist in residence. The production is cast through an audition process, which usually occurs at the beginning of each semester. Students may also receive credit through working on the production in a substantial technical or production related role.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 259


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 266 - Introduction to Drama


    A survey of theater history and dramatic literature from ancient Athens through the early 19th century. Plays include not only classics of Western drama but also exemplary theater texts from around the world.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 266  
    When Offered: Usually in the fall semester

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Recommended: Students intending to major/minor in theater usually take either THEA 266  or THEA 267  by the end of sophomore year. 
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 267 - Modern Drama


    A survey of the new theatrical styles to emerge around the world in the 19th and 20th centuries. Course readings closely consider the relationship between a play’s literary form and its realization in performance, as well as theater’s response to the emergence of film, television, and new media.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 267  
    When Offered: Usually in the spring semester

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Recommended: Students intending to major/minor in theater usually take either THEA 266  or THEA 267  by the end of sophomore year. 
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 271 - Introduction to Contemporary Dance


    Introduces students to the concepts and practice of contemporary dance. Students gain confidence, fluidity, and control of their movement expression.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 272 - Dance Imagery & Improvisation


    Teaches students how to use imagery as a choreographic tool to develop personal and inventive movement expression. Exercises emphasize a holistic body-mind perspective and cultivation of subtle body consciousness. This course complements the introductory through advanced levels of contemporary dance technique, as well as acting and theater improvisation courses. Students discover their aesthetic preferences and work to expand their expressivity.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 321 - Shakespeare


    Selected comedies, tragedies, and histories of Shakespeare, considered from a variety of critical, theatrical, historical, and textual perspectives, depending on the individual instructor’s interests. Students may take both 321 and 322, although only one of these courses may be counted towards a Theater major or minor.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 321  
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 322 - Shakespeare


    Selected comedies, tragedies, and histories of Shakespeare, considered from a variety of critical, theatrical, historical, and textual perspectives, depending on the individual instructor’s interests. Students may take both 321 and 322, although only one of these courses may be counted towards a Theater major or minor.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 322 
    When Offered: Spring semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No First-year, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 332 - Theater and Performance: London and the International Stage (Study Group)


    Designed for students to experience, examine and analyze from a performance perspective live theater and performance in London. While the course will focus primarily on British theatre: its productions, playwrights, traditions, theatres, and artists students will have the opportunity to attend performances by international companies in London. Productions attended will include as wide a variety of venues, styles, and periods of theatre as possible.

    Credits: 1.00
    Prerequisites: THEA 232
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 341E - Performing & Media Arts in Hong Kong (Extended Study)


    A three-week extended study course in the spring. The course offers students an immersive experience in Hong Kong’s vibrant performing and media arts scene. It includes visits to live performances, film screenings, museums, and galleries, as well as lectures and walking tours with Hong Kong-based scholars on the city’s history, arts, and culture.

    Credits: 0.50
    Crosslisted:   
    Prerequisites:   or (  or  )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 349 - Global Theater


    An exploration of Asian, African, intercultural, and postcolonial performance traditions, spanning theater, dance, ritual, and everyday life. Course materials include both classic and contemporary play texts along with selected readings in history, anthropology, and performance studies.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 349 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 350 - Theater Practicum


    Concerted, directed work in a specific theatrical skill.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 350


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 351 - American Theater


    Asks how we perform our American identities, both onstage and off. Readings include Euro-American, African American, Asian American and Latinx plays from the 19th century to the present along with selected readings in theater history and performance theory.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 351  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 353 - Theater Play and Improvisation


    A course designed to cultivate the actor’s creativity, spontaneity, and collaborative skills through theater play and improvisation. The course strives to locate the “quality of play,” which, at its essence, is a deep sense of far reaching curiosity. Narrative and corporeal improvisation are explored with a focus on the relationship between the actor’s body and intellect.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 353


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 354 - Basic Directing


    An introduction to the art and craft of directing. Theoretical information is coupled with concerted exploratory work. The aim is to create common experience in acquiring the fundamentals of the discipline, identify and cultivate individual creative potential, develop leadership skills and artistic responsibility.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 354


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 355 - Advanced Acting


    A technique and scene study class designed to be an exploration of plays with heightened language and/or style, e.g., the Greeks, Shakespeare, Moliere, or other verse drama.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: THEA 254  or ENGL 254
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 356 - Playwrighting


    General principles of playwrighting. The goal of the course is the creation of a finished work: a one-act play, one act of a longer play, or a complete play. Writing for the theater represents emotional and artistic commitment and intellectual pursuit. As part of the learning process, students tackle the artistic and pragmatic challenges of building methodically from the seeds of inspiration to the crafting of the well-written play. Text analysis investigates classic and modern plays. The class is a first-hand initiation into the vocabulary and technique of collaboration for the development of original material.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 356  
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 358 - Narrative Screenwriting


    A workshop approach to the craft of writing for the camera. Students read and analyze screenplays in order to understand the process of how the screenwriter tells a story. A complete, short, narrative screenplay is the final project for the course.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 359 - Performance II: Devised Theater Workshop


    A collaborative, advanced performance-based course focusing on the rehearsal of a work for public performance with a faculty or guest director. The course focuses on devising, a process that enables a group to be creatively involved in a work that both emerges and is generated by the group working collectively.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: (THEA 254  or ENGL 254) or (THEA 353  or ENGL 353)
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 363 - Narrative Improvisation and Storytelling: Gateway into Theater


    An advanced improvisation course building on the skills and techniques acquired in THEA 353. Students will develop and acquire new collaborative theatrical improvisational skills through the addition of long form improvisation, storytelling and public performance.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: THEA 353 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 371 - Advanced Contemporary Dance


    For students with some technical dance training experience, this course challenges participants to be daring in their dance while finding ease and fluidity in their movement.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: THEA 271 
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 391 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


  
  •  

    THEA 454 - Advanced Directing


    The course in the art and craft of theatre directing is a continuation of THEA 354 , focusing on expanding students’ directorial experience and expertise. Through reading, writing, exercises and practical assignments students develop the ability to analyze and interpret dramatic text, communicate and implement a directorial vision. Students perform technical and artistic requirements toward the completion of a theatre production.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: THEA 354  or ENGL 354
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    THEA 458 - Shakespeare’s Contemporaries


    English drama from the mid-16th century to the closing of the theaters in 1642, including plays by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, and others of Shakespeare’s contemporaries.

    Credits: 1.00
    Crosslisted: ENGL 458 
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    THEA 491 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    THEA 495 - Senior Seminar in Theater


    A studio course that brings together all senior majors and minors in a conceptual, creative project. THEA 495 is the culminating experience of the Colgate theater student. Students in the seminar create a piece of theater as an ensemble, developed not only through work with text but also through close attention to the raw materials of theater-making: time, space, and the body. Research and critical writing assignments form an integral part of the seminar, which may also include visits by guest artists and trips to see theater and performance beyond the Colgate campus.

    Credits: 1.00
    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: THEA 254  or ENGL 254 and (THEA 211  or ENGL 211  or THEA 266  or ENGL 266  or THEA 267  or ENGL 267 )
    Major/Minor Restrictions: Only Theater Majors and Minors
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None
    Formerly: ENGL 495


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    THEA 496 - Special Studies for Honors Candidates in Theater


    Creation and presentation of a significant work of playwriting, directing, design, and/or performance. With permission of the director of the theater program, theater majors who wish to pursue an honors project in the spring semester of their senior year may enroll in this course. Honors projects must be proposed in the fall semester of senior year. The project may also take the form of a long-form critical, historical, or theoretical essay.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: Human Thought and Expression
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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University Studies

  
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    UNST 106E - In the Footsteps of Galileo (Extended Study)


    An extended study course that follows a semester-long exploration of the development of modern scientific inquiry and knowledge, the conflict between science and religion, and the Galileo Affair in Saving the Appearances: Galileo, the Church, and the Scientific Endeavor and of Italian language and culture in Elementary Italian. The extended study course synthesizes a historical narrative that entangles the evolution of Catholic Church doctrine, the foundations of the epistemology of modern science, and Italian firebrand whose work left a lasting imprint on both endeavors and the language and the culture of the region he inhabited.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: CORE 106S 
    Prerequisites: ITAL 121  and CORE 106S  
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 210 - Innovation in the Digital Age


    Recent technological developments have changed the way that people create ideas and goods, interact with each other, and approach everyday tasks. This course investigates the rapid pace of disruptive innovation that is grounded in principles exemplified by advances in, and uses of, digital computing and communication networks. Such principles included discretization, modularity and reusability, resource sharing, automation, peer production, network effects, and the wisdom and fallacy of crowds. Scientific underpinnings and broad societal and economic effects of these principles will be studied. Special attention will be paid to the global reach of these principles, highlighting Israel and Brazil as examples of international contexts in which to deeply explore a culture of digital innovation. Open to Class of 2019 Benton Scholars only.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: No Junior, Senior, Sophomore
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 291 - Independent Study


    Opportunity for individual study in areas not covered by formal course offerings, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

    Credits: variable
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 313 - Darwin and the Victorian Age of Discovery


    Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species precipitated a scientific and philosophical revolution that continues to reverberate in contemporary society. This course is a vehicle for exploring the extent to which Darwin’s theory of natural selection - the single most important, unifying scientific idea ever proposed - reflected and transformed the scientific, social, political, economic, religious, as well as literary and artistic, contexts of Britain in the Victorian age of discovery (1830s-1900). An appreciation for Victorian society reveals how Darwin’s travels, career choices, scientific activities, domestic life, fragile health, and delayed publication of his evolutionary theory were shaped by the culture of the time. Examining the diverse and intense reactions to Darwin’s “dangerous idea” shows how his theory has been extended far beyond biology to a broad range of intellectual disciplines. Seminar discussions are based on multidisciplinary assignments, student presentations, and interactions with invited speakers. These are enhanced by field trips to classic localities of geologic interest and to a natural history museum.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 324 - Technology, Science, and Culture in the History of Manchester (Study Group)


    This Manchester study group course is an experiential look at the evidence of how technology and science changed Manchester, the first industrial city in the world, and my extension, changed the way we all live in the industrialized modern age. The study group visits an operating textile mill at Helmshore; the site of the first commercially smelted iron in the world at Ironbridge; the Leeds Liverpool Canal and its system of canal locks; the Albert Dock, at Liverpool, a primary 19th-century port for cotton and emigration; North Wales and its early 19th-century bridges and aqueducts; and a slate mine near Mt. Snowdon that provided Victorian Britain with its roof tiles.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 325 - The City on Water (Venice Study Group)


    Focuses on the exceptional character of Venice as a city built on water. An examination of the environmental setting of the Lagoon of Venice and traces the long history of the city’s development from its origins to the present day. Special attention is paid to the on-going give-and-take between the city and the sea, which has resulted in the complete transformation of the lagoon over the centuries, and the challenge of ‘saving’ a city at sea level from flooding in the 21st century.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 326 - Workshop of the World: Britain’s Industrial Revolution in Regional Perspective (Study Group)


    A survey of key themes in the economic and social history of Britain during the classic period of the industrial revolution (c. 1740-1850) and later economic transformation (1851-c. 1939). The aims of the course are to encourage students to reflect upon debates that historians have engaged in relation to these themes, as well as to relate these broad themes to regional perspectives (e.g., emergence of the railway networks vis-a-vis regional specialization of industrial activity, the regional impact of the loss of export markets for British goods following the First World War, etc.). At the end of the course, students are able to identify interactions between the social, economic, and political processes that shape an industrial society, how historians often deal with conflicting evidence about the scope and extent of change, and reflect upon how the study of history can inform our understanding of social and economic change.

    Credits: 0.50
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


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    UNST 330 - Health and Healing Practices (Wales Study Group)


    Humans have always been concerned with their health and have used various healing methods since ancient times. Focusing on Wales and beginning with an examination of the healing traditions of ancient Celtic people, the impact of successive conquerors and of contact with merchants on medical practices in Wales will be explored. New diseases which arose as human population increased and cities grew and industries developed will be examined. Also numerous scientific discoveries and inventions have changed healing practices. This course will examine changes in the concept of health and in the practice of medicine over time, ending with a consideration of the state of the current health care system in Wales, comparing it to the US health care system, and of future prospects for health care systems.

    Credits: 1.00
    Corequisite: None
    Prerequisites: None
    Major/Minor Restrictions: None
    Class Restriction: None
    Area of Inquiry: None
    Liberal Arts CORE: None


    Click here for Course Offerings by term


 

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